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History
11:39 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Birmingham Bombing: 50 Years Later, A Different America?

It's been half a century since the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed. The blast killed four little girls and was a turning point in the civil rights movement. Host Michel Martin revisits that era with historian Taylor Branch.

All Tech Considered
11:36 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Whether Facebook Makes You Lonely Depends On How You Use It

Does Facebook make you sadder? It depends on how you use it.
Facebook

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 1:20 pm

Not long ago, we reported on a new University of Michigan study that found the more young people used Facebook, the worse they felt. According to the research, Facebook use led to declines in moment-to-moment happiness and overall life satisfaction.

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Code Switch
9:54 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Why Do We Describe Asian Eyes As 'Almond-Shaped'?

The shape of Asian eyes has been compared to almonds by Westerners for centuries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:06 am

Last week, Julie Chen revealed on The Talk that she had double eyelid surgery to make her eyes look "less Chinese" in order to advance her TV career.

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Around the Nation
8:57 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Several Reported Dead In Shooting At Navy Yard In Washington

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We will go to NPR's business news in a moment. Right now, let's get an update on what we do know about a shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. today. We have to begin by being frank. What we do not know exceeds what we do. NPR's Jennifer Ludden is on the scene of that shooting today - or near it - and she's on line. And Jennifer, what have you been learning?

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The Two-Way
4:50 am
Mon September 16, 2013

More Rain Expected As Helicopters Search For Stranded Flood Victims

Miranda Woodard and Joey Schendel salvage and clean property after days of flooding in Hygiene, Colo. Mountain towns that had been cut off for days by massive flooding slowly reopened Monday, to reveal cabins toppled, homes ripped from their foundations and everything covered in a thick layer of muck.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 4:02 pm

This post was last updated at 6 p.m. ET.

Helicopters were back in the air on Monday over the 15 counties across Colorado's Front Range where historic flooding has killed at least seven people, left hundreds more stranded and unaccounted for, and forced nearly 12,000 to evacuate their homes.

In a news conference, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said 21 helicopters were conducting "search and rescue missions," and other teams were trying to assess the damage to transportation infrastructure.

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Around the Nation
2:12 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Rain Still Falling In Waterlogged Northern Colorado

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 5:09 am

Residents are flocking to shelters to escape massive flooding from days of rain. Hundreds of people remain stranded. Four deaths have been blamed on the deluge, and authorities fear the death toll could go higher.

Shots - Health News
1:22 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Calling Obesity A Disease May Make It Easier To Get Help

Differences in brain chemistry can affect an individual's likelihood of weight gain.
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 7:04 am

Under the Affordable Care Act, more insurance plans are expected to start covering the cost of obesity treatments, including counseling on diet and exercise as well as medications and surgery. These are treatments that most insurance companies don't cover now.

The move is a response to the increasing number of health advocates and medical groups that say obesity should be classified as a disease.

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Around the Nation
5:08 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

What Is The Role Of Jails In Treating The Mentally Ill?

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Twin Towers Correctional Facility is part of the largest municipal jail system in the United States. Many of its nearly 4,000 inmates are deemed mentally ill.
Damian Dovarganes AP

The county's Twin Towers Correctional Facility in downtown Los Angeles is a hulking, massive concrete structure. It is also part of the largest municipal jail system in the United States.

On a recent day, four men enter handcuffed with a police escort. The sheriff's deputies assign them cells, and for the duration of their sentences, this is home. The men wear bright blue pants and neon yellow shirts to set them apart from other inmates.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

Summers Pulls Out Of Running To Be Federal Reserve Chief

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Citing what he calls an "acrimonious" confirmation process, Lawrence Summers called President Obama to tell him of his decision not to seek the job of Federal Reserve Chairman Sunday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 9:01 am

Larry Summers has removed his name from the running to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve. The former Treasury secretary informed President Obama of his decision in a phone call Sunday. The withdrawal was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

Obama Says He And Iran's Rowhani Have Exchanged Letters

Iran's President Hasan Rowhani, who was elected in June, has exchanged lettes with President Obama, the U.S. leader said in an interview that aired Sunday. Here, Rowhani speaks to Iran's Parliament in Tehran.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

In the weeks since Iran's President Hasan Rowhani was elected this summer, he and President Obama have swapped letters, Obama says. The U.S. president discussed the exchange for the first time publicly in an interview with George Stephanopoulos that aired on ABC's This Week Sunday.

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Code Switch
2:26 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

Who's Really Left Out Of The CrossFit Circle

CrossFitters exercise at a gym in Travis, N.Y. A blog posted to CrossFit's Facebook page has opened up a discussion about diversity in the CrossFit community.
Anthony DePrimo Staten Island Advance /Landov

Last week, the headquarters for CrossFit, the popular — and polarizing — workout genre, shared an item on its Facebook page from a blog called Stuff Black People Don't Like.

And according to an entry from February on the Stuff Black People Don't Like blog, CrossFit is anti-black:

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It's All Politics
12:43 pm
Sun September 15, 2013

After Faltering Weeks For Obama, What Counts Is Winning

Protesters gather outside the White House on Tuesday before President Obama addressed the nation about the situation in Syria. Obama said he was asking Congress to delay authorizing a strike on Syria to allow a diplomatic plan to work.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 1:56 pm

Sometimes presidents have to make things up as they go along.

President Obama's decisions have had an improvisational air these past three weeks. His course on Syria kept shifting, at times seemingly guided by offhand remarks.

But the results are what count.

"If it works out in the end, the president's allowed to be uncertain," says Tim Naftali, a former director of the Nixon presidential library. "Oftentimes, the judgment you get during the crisis is not the judgment you get at the end."

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The Two-Way
10:23 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Death Toll Likely To Rise In Colorado Flooding, Officials Say

A woman walks past Boulder Creek, whose swollen waters have receded a bit after intense rain that fell for days has abated, in Boulder, Colo., Sunday.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 11:51 am

The floods that have repeatedly inundated large parts of central and northeastern Colorado since Wednesday likely killed more than the four people who have been confirmed dead, officials say. The search for victims has taken second priority to rescue and relief operations, as agencies rush to help people who remain at risk. President Obama has declared a major disaster in the area.

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Middle East
9:42 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Syria Deal Puts Russia, And Its Influence, In Spotlight

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Police Wound Two Bystanders In Shooting Near Times Square

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 9:56 am

Caught in the line of fire by police officers, two women were shot near crowded Times Square in Manhattan last night. The bystanders were wounded as police struggled to deal with a man who was behaving erratically. The man had "simulated" firing a gun at police; he was not found to have a weapon.

The incident began just after 9:30 p.m. Saturday, when police say an agitated man was running around in traffic in the area of 42nd Street and Eighth Avenue.

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Shots - Health News
6:20 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Deadly Amoeba Found For First Time In Municipal Water Supply

Kali Hardig, 12, was released from a hospital in Little Rock, Ark., on Sept. 11 after surviving a brain infection caused by amoebas.
Danny Johnston Associated Press

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:32 am

A 4-year-old child who died of a rare brain infection in early August has led Louisiana health officials to discover that the cause is lurking in the water pipes of St. Bernard Parish, southeast of New Orleans.

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Code Switch
5:51 am
Sun September 15, 2013

50 Years After The Bombing, Birmingham Still Subtly Divided

Investigators work outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., following an explosion that killed four young girls. Three Ku Klux Klansmen were convicted in the bombing years later.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:18 am

Fifty years ago Sunday, a Ku Klux Klan bomb at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Ala., killed four black girls and sent shock waves throughout the country.

In Birmingham, the tragedy laid bare a deep rift.

Carolyn McKinstry, standing on the sidewalk outside 16th Street Baptist Church, remembers arriving for worship 50 years ago.

"It was Youth Day," she says. "We were excited because that meant we got to do everything. We sang, we ushered, we did everything."

Some of her Sunday school classmates had gone to the ladies' room to freshen up.

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The U.S. Response To Syria
4:15 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Breaking Down Chemical Weapons, One Fact At A Time

A U.S. Marine carries a light flame-thrower while wearing experimental clothing designed to protect against atomic, biological and chemical warfare in 1960.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:00 pm

Saturday, the U.S. and Russia announced an agreement on the destruction of Syria's chemical weapons. The country has a week to detail its chemical arsenal and has until the middle of 2014 to destroy its stockpile. The State Department has published a framework for the plan.

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U.S.
3:52 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

New York Underground: Exploring City Caves And Catacombs

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 4:15 pm

Urban explorer Steve Duncan goes underground, examining the hidden infrastructure of major cities all over the world: their tunnels, subways and sewers. Late in 2010, NPR's Jacki Lyden joined Duncan and a group of subterranean adventurers in New York. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Jan. 2, 2011.)

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Around the Nation
3:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

In Flooded Colorado, Rescue Amid The Rain

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 4:15 pm

Hundreds of people have been evacuated from flooded areas of Colorado, which on Saturday saw a brief break in heavy rain. But with more rain in the forecast, lives and homes remain in danger.

World
3:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

U.S.-Russia Deal: Syria Has A Week To Detail Chemical Arsenal

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 4:15 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

The U.S. and Russia have agreed on a plan to get rid of Syria's chemical weapons by the middle of next year. Secretary of State John Kerry calls it an ambitious timetable but says he's confident the international community can keep the pressure on Syria to comply. President Obama welcomed the agreement but says the U.S. remains prepared to act should the diplomatic route fail.

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Parallels
3:11 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Cold War Flashback? Vienna Villa Alleged To Be NSA Post

The villa that allegedly belongs to the NSA in Vienna. News outlets, the government and opposition parties are battling it out over allegations that the stately villa in a leafy Vienna district served as a sophisticated a U.S. intelligence listening post keeping tabs on most of Vienna.
Hans Punz AP

For fans of Cold War-era spy stories, Vienna carries a certain allure — as seen in this YouTube video with scenes from the classic film The Third Man.

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Bookless Public Library Opens In Texas

An artist's rendering shows computer stations at the new BiblioTech bookless public library in Bexar County, Texas. The library is holding its grand opening Saturday.
Courtesy of Bexar County

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 4:02 pm

An all-digital public library is opening today, as officials in Bexar County, Texas, celebrate the opening of the BiblioTech library. The facility offers about 10,000 free e-books for the 1.7 million residents of the county, which includes San Antonio.

On its website, the Bexar County BiblioTech library explains how its patrons can access free eBooks and audio books. To read an eBook on their own device, users must have the 3M Cloud Library app, which they can link to their library card.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Colorado Gets Brief Break From Flood Warnings; Rain Is Forecast

Samantha Kinzig of Longmont, Colo., and her daughter Isabel, 5, took a close look at a damaged bridge in Longmont Friday. Heavy rains that fueled widespread flooding in numerous Colorado towns have eased, but forecasters predict more on Saturday and Sunday.
Marc Piscotty Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 2:17 pm

The rains that brought severe flooding to parts of northern and central Colorado have eased, allowing people a chance to regroup before more rain comes, possibly as soon as Saturday afternoon. Thousands of residents have been displaced by the flooding, from Fort Collins in the north to Colorado Springs in the south, since waters hit dangerous levels Wednesday.

The floods have been blamed for four deaths, as the Two-Way reported Friday.

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StoryCorps
5:47 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Hotline Responders Answer Veterans' Desperate Calls

Rich Barham, left, and Nelson Peck are both veterans working for the Veterans Crisis Line.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 11:43 am

Responders at the Veterans Crisis Line work to help veterans through their darkest hours. The Department of Veterans Affairs runs the hotline, the only national line dedicated to helping veterans in crisis.

A report in February was the most comprehensive to date from the VA on veterans and suicide. As of that publication, the Crisis Line had made approximately 26,000 rescues of actively suicidal veterans.

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NPR Story
5:22 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Rescue Operations Underway In Flooded Colorado

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 9:28 am

Heavy rain and flooding have destroyed scores of communities, with at least four people dead. While the rain had let up a little, more is expected Saturday.

National Security
4:57 am
Sat September 14, 2013

Medea Benjamin's Anti-War Activism: Wearing Pink, Seeing Red

A Code Pink protester holds up a red-painted hand behind Secretary of State John Kerry as he testifies on Capitol Hill on Sept. 4 about possible military strikes on Syria.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 9:49 am

As the Obama administration made its case for military action in Syria, one of the loudest voices in opposition came from Medea Benjamin, the co-founder of Code Pink.

You may not know her by name, but if you follow national politics, you've no doubt seen her work.

At the House Foreign Affairs Committee earlier this month, for instance, as Secretary of State John Kerry made the case for a military strike in Syria, Medea Benjamin sat behind him, holding up her hands, painted bright red.

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Around the Nation
2:53 am
Sat September 14, 2013

For Wounded Vets, Climbing Half Dome Only Half The Mission

At base camp, Timmy O'Neill, gives instructions to volunteers and veterans participating in the week's hiking and climbing activities.
David P Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 12:50 pm

Timmy O'Neill is guiding Steve Baskis through ancient yellow pines that almost touch the sky. They're hiking all day to base camp in California's Yosemite National Park, 2,000 feet up in Little Yosemite Valley.

Taking Baskis by the hand, O'Neill traces the distant ridge of Half Dome, a bald rock rising almost a mile from the valley floor. That's tomorrow's challenge.

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Shots - Health News
4:23 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Synthetic Marijuana Prompts Colorado Health Investigation

A sign outside a medical marijuana dispensary in Manitou Springs, Colo. Voters amended the state's constitution to legalize marijuana for recreational use in November 2012.
Eric Whitney

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 3:58 pm

More than 150 people are now believed to have been sickened by synthetic marijuana in Colorado, which legalized recreational use of real pot last November. Three people may have died.

State and federal investigators are scrambling to identify the exact source of the illnesses. The state health department has named about a dozen illicit products, often sold as "incense," that it believes are responsible for at least some of the illnesses. The stuff goes by names like "Spice," "Crazy Clown" and "Dead Man Walking."

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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Still Reeling From Sandy, Seaside, N.J. Boardwalk Burns

Nearly a year after the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy, four blocks along a strip of New Jersey's famous boardwalks have been destroyed by fire. On Friday, firefighters were still dousing smoldering embers and other hotspots from the raging blaze. Gov. Chris Christie said the sight of the damage to iconic businesses along the Seaside boardwalks was sickening.

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