U.S. News

The Sunday Conversation
2:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Patrolling Border, Sheriff Sees Immigrants' 'Determination'

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz.
Courtesy of Tony Estrada

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz., the poorest of all the border counties in the U.S. There are more than 1,000 Border Patrol Agents stationed in the county, which shares some 50 miles of border with Mexico.

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Code Switch
2:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

With Fla. Verdict, Is Protective Clothing Still Required?

Many families live in dread of standing in the shoes of Trayvon Martin's parents. His mother, Sybrina Fulton (second from left) and father, Tracy Martin, were in court Friday as a Florida jury began its deliberations.
Gary W. Green AP

"I'm ashamed at how long it took me to realize why so many people in my family have been consumed with looking church-ready when they step out the door regardless of time or day."

That Facebook quote came from Phyllis Fletcher, an African-American colleague at KUOW in Seattle. And it reminded me of something my sister once told me when a white friend teased her about taking too long to get ready when they went on joint shopping expeditions. "Why are you getting all dressed up? Just throw on some jeans, like me, and let's go."

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The Salt
1:02 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Homemade Bitters Put The Local Bite Back Into Cocktails

Homemade bitters with medicinal herbs and roots at the Black Trumpet Bistro in Portsmouth, N.H.
Emily Corwin New Hampshire Public Radio

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 10:41 am

Evan Mallett is hovering over some plants in a Victorian-era greenhouse in Portsmouth, N.H.

Mallett, a chef at the Black Trumpet Bistro, is collecting medicinal herbs, which he infuses in alcohol to make his own bitters, a bittersweet alcoholic concentrate used to flavor cocktails.

Mallett says he often forages in the woods for ingredients like wild chamomile, dock and burdock root for his bitters, too.

The "homemade bitters" trend is relatively new.

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U.S.
3:16 pm
Sat July 13, 2013

A Trial Made For Prime Time

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN: And as Jim just mentioned, the issues at play in the Zimmerman trial - guns, race and even social class - almost compel us to watch.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS SHOWS)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: The trial of George Zimmerman, another dramatic day in court...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: It's become such a closely watched, very highly charged court trial...

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Russia Says It Hasn't Received Snowden Asylum Request

Edward Snowden at a news conference at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Friday in an image provided by Human Rights Watch.
Tanya Lokshina AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 3:44 pm

Immigration officials in Russia say they've not received any application from Edward Snowden, the man accused of leaking top-secret NSA documents, a day after he told the media in Moscow that his plan was to seek temporary asylum.

Interfax news agency quotes Russian migration service head Konstantin Romodanovsky as saying no asylum request had been received as yet.

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Jury Acquits Zimmerman Of All Charges

George Zimmerman, right, is congratulated by his defense team after being found not guilty of all charges in Seminole Circuit Court in Sanford, Fla., on Saturday.
Gary W. Green AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:14 pm

Updated 10:27 p.m. ET

The jury in the murder trial of George Zimmerman on Saturday acquitted the former neighborhood watch volunteer of all charges in the 2012 fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin during a scuffle in a gated Florida community.

The six-woman jury announced its verdict of not guilty at about 10 p.m. ET, after more than 16 hours of deliberations over two days.

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News
5:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Witness In Zimmerman Case Testifies By Skype

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:22 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

When George Zimmerman stood trial this week the prosecution called his former professor Scott Pleasants to the stand, not in person but over that social media technology called Skype. The state of Florida completed a round of questioning...

(SOUNDBITE OF CRIMINAL TRIAL)

JOHN GUY: Thank you. No other questions, Your Honor.

JUDGE DEBRA NELSON: OK. Cross.

(SOUNDBITE OF BEEPING)

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News
5:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Zimmerman Jury Deliberates

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:22 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. A six-person jury in Sanford, Fla., is deliberating today in the murder trial of George Zimmerman. He's the neighborhood watch volunteer who's charged in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. After three weeks of testimony and more than 50 witnesses, the jury heard closing arguments from prosecutors and defense yesterday.

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Food
5:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

A Summery Spread That's As Cool As A Cucumber

Benedictine is a combination of cream cheese, cucumber and onion. It may sound odd, unless you're from Kentucky.
Erica Peterson WFPL

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 11:58 am

Cream cheese, cucumber juice and a touch of onion. That may sound like an unlikely combination, but Benedictine is a Kentucky favorite. Gwynne Potts, a self-proclaimed aficionado, says it's delicious.

"The best thing to eat Benedictine on is just white bread," Potts says. "No special bread; it only takes away from the Benedictine."

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StoryCorps
3:52 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Brothers Lost On Deployment; Sister Mourns 'Soul Mates'

Monica Velez and her two brothers, Freddy (left) and Andrew, in 1996. Freddy died in Iraq in 2004, and Andrew died in Afghanistan in 2006.
Courtesy of Monica Velez

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:22 am

Cpl. Jose "Freddy" Velez served in Iraq. His brother, Spc. Andrew Velez, deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Both died in their early 20s. They are survived by their sister, Monica.

"My mom left us when I was 7, so my dad was a single parent," Monica says. "And I did all the household chores. I got the boys dressed for school, I taught them how to ride their bike, I taught them how to read and write."

One of her favorite memories is when both brothers came back from basic training and told her she could no longer be bossy.

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News
10:49 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Abortion Rights Activists Plan Challenge To Texas Measure

Abortion rights opponents, dressed in blue, and supporters, wearing orange, rally in the state Capitol rotunda Friday before the vote on a set of sweeping abortion restrictions.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:31 am

In a major victory for the anti-abortion movement, the Texas state Senate passed a sweeping bill early Saturday that has become a flashpoint in the national abortion debate. Gov. Rick Perry is expected to sign it in short order.

But the fight is not over. Abortion rights supporters say that the new law attempts to overturn Roe vs. Wade in Texas, and that's why they plan to take their fight to the courts.

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The Salt
4:57 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Micro-Garden Madness: You Showed Us Your Stuff

Tomatoes and herbs grow in barrels in this urban micro-garden.
Nico Sanchez via Flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:30 am

Earlier this week, we told you about some of the people who are trying to make micro-gardening go big — by sharing their DIY tips and selling products designed to make gardening in a small space a piece of cake. Many readers of The Salt let us know they were all for it.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

San Francisco Hospital Reports Third Death In Asiana Crash

A third death has been reported in the crash-landing of Asiana Airline flight 214, as San Francisco General Hospital said Friday that one of its patients who was injured in the accident has died. Hospital officials described the victim as a girl; they offered no further details about her.

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Code Switch
4:01 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Years Later, Miss Indian America Pageant Winners Reunite

Vivian Arviso says her year of service as Miss Indian America included a stint answering tourists' questions at Disneyland's Indian Village.
Sheridan County Library

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

The women who were crowned Miss Indian America are reuniting this weekend in Sheridan, Wyo. The Native American pageant ran from 1953 to 1984 and attracted contestants from across the country. Originally, the pageant started as a way to combat prejudices against Native Americans.

Wahleah Lujan, of Taos Pueblo in northern New Mexico, who won the title in 1966, was very shy at the time. In one of her appearances right after she was crowned, she told an audience: "The most important thing in my life is the preservation of our ancient pueblo and the Rio Pueblo de Taos."

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Business
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Boeing Takes Another Hit With Fire On Plagued 787 Dreamliner

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

An Ethiopian Airlines jet caught fire on the ground today at London's Heathrow Airport. It was a Boeing 787, also known as the Dreamliner, which has more than its share of troubles. The 787 has had serious problems with its lithium-ion batteries. In January, one overheated and another caught fire. The whole 787 fleet was grounded for more than three months after that.

Here's NPR's John Ydstie with more on what happened today.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Community Leaders Brace For Fallout From Zimmerman Verdict

Chimurenqa Waller leads demonstrators in a chant in front of the Seminole County Courthouse while the jury deliberated in the trial of George Zimmerman on Friday
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 5:30 am

As the nation waits for the jury's verdict on George Zimmerman, community leaders in Florida are in place, prepared for a big public reaction.

Government and law enforcement officials say they're hoping for the best with any demonstrations that may come after the verdict. But they're also preparing for the worst – rising tensions that could escalate violently.

An 'Opportunity' For Peace?

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Law
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Jury Begins Deliberations In George Zimmerman Case

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A jury in Sanford, Florida is beginning deliberations in the electric and closely watched trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder and manslaughter in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. He's pleaded not guilty. He said he acted in self defense. We have two reports now on the trial and preparations outside the courtroom.

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National Security
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Snowden's Asylum Contingent On Not Leaking More Secrets

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden is requesting asylum in Russia while he pursues a more permanent asylum in Latin America. A condition of his continued stay in Russia is that he stop releasing information that is damaging to the US.

Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Wal-Mart Threatens To Pull Out Of D.C. Over Wage Requirements

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Wal-Mart is threatening to walk away from plans to build three of six new stores slated for the nation's capital. Those three stores are supposed to go up in some of the city's neediest neighborhoods. But the city council in Washington, D.C., has approved a bill requiring big box stores to pay employees a living wage of $12.50 an hour. And Wal-Mart says if that becomes the law, it will scrap its plans.

NPR's Allison Keyes spoke to people in those communities about their thoughts on the standoff.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Justice Tightens Guidelines For Obtaining Records From Media

Attorney General Eric Holder speaking at the Justice Department last month.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:59 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder announced a tightening of Justice Department guidelines for dealing with the sensitive issue of subpoenas of journalists' communications, weeks after embarrassing disclosures that his office had secretly obtained phone records and emails from reporters as part of a probe of unauthorized leaks.

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Code Switch
2:21 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Awkwardly Awaiting The Zimmerman Trial's Outcome

George Zimmerman wipes his face after arriving in the courtroom for his trial in Sanford, Fla., on Friday. Zimmerman is charged in the 2012 shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:40 pm

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The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Man Hailed As A Hero After Epic Swim Saves Stranded Family

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:10 pm

"It wasn't an option. It just had to be done."

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All Tech Considered
10:12 am
Fri July 12, 2013

A Quick History Of Accidental Online Purchases By Kids

In little hands, a tech gadget can quickly turn from a toy to a cash register.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:59 am

EBay's app is so easy to use, a toddler can do it — and her parents would argue about whether that's a good thing.

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The Salt
10:12 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Heavy Rains Send Iowa's Precious Soil Downriver

Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013.
USDA Natural Resources Conservation

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:33 am

What a difference a year makes. Last year at this time, the Midwest was heading into one of the worst droughts in decades. Now much of the region is soggy.

But the biggest loser from this year's heavy rains? The land itself.

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Around the Nation
10:05 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Can't Even See The Sky': Ex-Prisoner On Solitary Confinement

Thousands of California prisoners are waging a hunger strike, protesting conditions in the prisons. For more on the strike and the prisoners' demands, host Michel Martin talks with Los Angeles Times Reporter Paige St. John and former inmate Jerry Elster, of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children.

Code Switch
3:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Oakland Braces For Seeing Subway Shooting On The Big Screen

Fruitvale Station, a new feature film depicting the shooting, multiple times." href="/post/oakland-braces-seeing-subway-shooting-big-screen" class="noexit lightbox">
Cephus "Bobby" Johnson in 2011, when the former transit officer who shot Johnson's nephew, Oscar Grant, was released from jail. Johnson and other family members have seen Fruitvale Station, a new feature film depicting the shooting, multiple times.
Jason Redmond AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:00 pm

It's not often that Oakland, Calif., hosts a movie opening. But there is plenty of anticipation for Fruitvale Station.

The film is about the life and death of Oscar Grant, a young black man who was fatally shot in the back by a white transit police officer in the early morning hours of New Year's Day in 2009.

Grant was killed by Officer Johannes Mehserle, who claimed to have been reaching for his Taser, not his handgun. Mehserle was tried and convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served 11 months of a two-year term.

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Code Switch
12:48 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mary Hamilton, The Woman Who Put The 'Miss' In Court

Mary Hamilton was found in contempt of court in Alabama, when she refused to answer questions after the prosecution addressed her only by her first name. The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled in her favor.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:58 am

When the U.S. Supreme Court issues a ruling, its decisions can carry weight for generations. Think about decisions in the civil rights era regarding school segregation and the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama.

As part of our look back on the summer of 1963, we examine another Alabama case that had a subtle effect on the way courts treat defendants.

At a mock trial at Samford University in Birmingham, a student playing the role of a defense attorney questions his client on the stand: "To your knowledge, can a driver turning left turn on a yellow light?"

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StoryCorps
8:03 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

A Father And Daughter 'Keep The Faith' During Cancer Fight

Faith in 2008, on her fifth birthday.
Courtesy of Jerris Marr

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:13 am

For the past three years, StoryCorps' Legacy program has given people facing serious illness the chance to record interviews with loved ones and caregivers. Recently, StoryCorps expanded the program to include children.

In 2007, Faith Marr was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer on her spine. She was 4 years old. That year she had her first of eight surgeries, replacing her vertebrae with titanium rods. Doctors were uncertain about her chances of survival.

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The Two-Way
5:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Prison Sterilization Report Prompts Call For Inquiry In California

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:18 pm

California lawmakers are calling for an investigation into allegations that 148 female prisoners underwent tubal ligation surgeries without the state's required approval. Some inmates said they had been pressured into undergoing the sterilization procedure, according to a report by the Center for Investigative Reporting.

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The Salt
3:38 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Why Doctors Oppose Force-Feeding Guantanamo Hunger Strikers

To raise awareness about force-feeding, Yasiin Bey, the musician and actor formerly known as Mos Def, in a video voluntarily underwent the same procedure administered to prisoners who refuse solid food in political protest while they are held in Guantanamo Bay.
Reprieve/Asif Kapadia

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:26 pm

For centuries, the act of refusing food has turned human bodies into effective political bargaining chips. And so it's no surprise that the prisoners desperate to leave Guantanamo after, in some cases, nearly a dozen years there, have turned to hunger strikes on and off since 2005 to try to win their release.

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