U.S. News

News
5:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Defense Begins Case In Bulger Trial

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Code Switch
5:18 am
Sat July 27, 2013

'Justice For Trayvon' Movement Struggles To Find Focus

Marchers aligned with the Justice for Trayvon Martin movement called for a federal civil rights action to be filed against George Zimmerman in Phoenix on Monday. Zimmerman was found not guilty in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

In the two weeks since George Zimmerman's acquittal, the same activists galvanized by his trial are finding it hard to focus the energy of the Trayvon Martin movement.

For 16 months, supporters of the Justice for Trayvon movement rallied behind a common goal: Make sure Zimmerman, the man who killed Trayvon Martin, stood before the bar of justice.

But after Zimmerman's trial and acquittal, that united front has splintered.

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The Salt
4:38 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Tucson Food Bank Helps The Needy Grow Their Own Food

Food bank client Jamie Senik takes a break near her garden plot sponsored by the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. She grows food for herself and her diabetic mother.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 8:15 pm

Food banks around the country face growing demand, despite improvements in the economy. Many families are still underemployed and struggling. So some food banks are looking for more permanent ways to address hunger, beyond handing out food.

One of them is the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona, based in Tucson. Among the many programs it runs is Las Milpitas de Cottonwood, a community farm located in one of the city's lower-income neighborhoods.

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News
4:16 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Public Opinion May Give Russia An Edge In Snowden Case

Russian lawyer Anatoly Kucherena is representing NSA contractor Edward Snowden, said Russia has three months to consider his request for temporary asylum.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 6:25 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin keeps insisting that he doesn't want the case of a fugitive American intelligence contractor to harm relations between Russia and the United States.

But Edward Snowden remains an irritant, stuck in diplomatic limbo in the transit area of a Moscow airport.

A Putin spokesman said Friday that the issue is being discussed by the Russian federal security service — the FSB — and the FBI, but it may be that Snowden has become a problem that can only be solved at the top of the two governments.

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News
3:47 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Emergency Summit On Urban Violence Opens In Chicago

A sidewalk memorial in Chicago remembers Eugene Clark, 25, who was shot and killed last weekend. In the same weekend, the city had at least 6 people killed and 22 wounded by gunfire. This weekend, the Congressional Black Caucus held a summit in Chicago to discuss violence in urban areas.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Rep. Robin Kelly, one of the hosts of the urban violence summit in Chicago, said at the outset Friday that this wouldn't be just another summit.

"Maybe just some of you are tired of having your leaders hold summits that are long on talk and short on action," she told attendees. "Today's summit aims to be different."

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Food
3:46 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Pie-Deprived New Orleans Roots For Bakery, A Year After Fire

Jill Pasquarella (right) pours powdered sugar on Brandon Connelly, who dressed as a baker from Hubig's Pies, during Mardi Gras in New Orleans in February.
Chris Granger The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Almost any kind of comeback gets New Orleans excited, since the city lost so much in the flood after Hurricane Katrina. That goes especially for food.

One year ago Saturday, New Orleans lost a beloved brand when Hubig's pie bakery burned to the ground. The hand-held, fruit-filled crescents, fried golden-brown, had been delivered fresh to more than 1,000 local stores each morning.

Pie fans have come out in droves to support the company. But it takes more than T-shirts and fond memories to restart a business from scratch.

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Shots - Health News
5:07 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

50 Years On, Research On Sex Can Still Be A Lightning Rod

Johnson with her fellow researcher and sometimes husband, William Masters. The pair helped legitimize the study of human sexuality.
AP

The world has changed a lot since a divorced mother of two teamed up with a St. Louis gynecologist to study the physiology of sex.

Masters and Johnson's first book, Human Sexual Response, made Virginia Johnson and William Masters household names in the 1960s. More than any other scientists before them, they approached sex as a biological process to be observed, measured and analyzed.

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Sports
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Yankees Want Him Out But Alex Rodriguez Wants To Stay

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. One criticism of baseball is that it's too prone to long stretches of inaction, players sitting around not doing much. Well, if that's what baseball is, then Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees has been Mr. Baseball this season. He's been on the disabled list, but he claims he's healthy enough to play. His team begs to differ. Here to talk about the confusion is NPR's Mike Pesca, who joins us from New York. Hi, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Can Software That Predicts Crime Pass Constitutional Muster?

Jeff Brantingham, creator of PredPol, demonstrates computer-generated "predictive policing" zones at the Los Angeles Police Department Unified Command Post in Los Angeles last year.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Typically, police arrive at the scene of a crime after it occurs. But rather than send cops to yesterday's crime, a new trend in law enforcement is using computers to predict where tomorrow's crimes will be — and then try to head them off.

The software uses past statistics to project where crime is moving. Police in Los Angeles say it's worked well in predicting property crimes there. Now Seattle is about to expand it for use in predicting gun violence.

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Law
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Cleveland Kidnapper Pleads Guilty, Avoiding Death Penalty

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Cleveland, there will be no trial for the man accused of kidnapping three women and holding them captive in his house for about a decade. Today, Ariel Castro pleaded guilty to more than 900 charges in exchange for avoiding the death penalty. Here's Nick Castele from member station WCPN.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Trayvon Martin's Mother Finds New Role As An Activist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The mother of Trayvon Martin has spoken widely about the killing of her son. And today, she moved from the role of grieving parent to civil rights advocate. In Philadelphia, Sybrina Fulton addressed the nation's oldest civil rights group, the National Urban League. She called on members to join her in making sure what happened to her son doesn't happen to other children. NPR's Greg Allen has this report.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

San Diego Mayor Headed To Treatment After Harassment Claims

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. San Diego's mayor, Democrat Bob Filner, says he'll step away from his duties and go into two weeks of treatment next month. Numerous women have come forward with allegations of sexual harassment. Mayor Filner made the announcement earlier today.

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Law
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Halliburton Pleads Guilty To Destroying Oil Spill Evidence

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, a guilty plea in the case of the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico. A subsidiary of Halliburton has agreed to plead guilty to charges that it destroyed evidence connected to the disaster. The oil rig exploded in 2010, killing 11 workers, launching a massive oil spill. NPR's Jeff Brady tells us more.

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Economy
2:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Replacing Ben Bernanke Is A Delicate Task

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. Change is coming at the Federal Reserve. Chairman Ben Bernanke is expected to step down in January, and then the delicate task of ending the Fed's massive stimulus program will land in his successor's lap. The jockeying for that job has begun.

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Politics
2:29 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

NYC Tabloids Go Gaga Over Naughty Pols

March 2008 front pages
New York Post/New York Daily News

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 2:38 pm

Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer have been very good to the New York tabloids.

First, they delivered lurid scandals for cheeky newspaper headline writers to work with. That's like rocket fuel for the tabs, which thrive on conflict and scandal and aren't nearly as cautious and measured as the broadsheets.

Then, after resigning from office — Weiner from Congress, Spitzer from the governorship — each decided to make an against-all-odds return to elected politics this year.

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It's All Politics
1:43 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

McConnell's Kentucky Challenger Gets Her Act Together

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes raises her game in a video about her challenge to GOP Sen. Mitch McConnell.
Grimes For Senate

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:52 pm

Maybe the Democrat who hopes to unseat Sen. Mitch McConnell is ready for prime time after all.

That's one way to view the highly polished Web video in which Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky's secretary of state, appears, employing humor, pathos, earnestness and her grandmothers to skewer the leader of the Senate Republicans.

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Hedge Fund SAC Capital Pleads Not Guilty To Fraud Charges

Preet Bharara, United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, speaks at a news conference on Thursday about a federal indictment against SAC Capital.
Timothy Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 3:04 pm

Hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors has pleaded not guilty to wire and securities fraud, a day after federal prosecutors in New York charged the firm in connection with an alleged insider trading scheme.

Peter Nussbaum, SAC's general counsel, entered the plea on behalf of the firm, one of Wall Street's biggest hedge funds.

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Sports
1:16 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Age Hasn't Stopped This Man From Swimming — And Winning

Graham Johnston, 82, poses for a portrait through an underwater window at the pool on Wednesday. Graham competed at the Senior Games in Cleveland, where more than 10,000 athletes older than 55 are competing in various sports.
Benjamin Morris for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:01 am

More than 10,000 athletes are meeting in Cleveland for The National Senior Games. Adults older than 55 — and some older than 90 — are running track, riding bikes, playing basketball and competing in many of the sports you might see at the Summer Olympics. In fact there are a few who were Olympians themselves back in the day who say they find that competition is just as satisfying in their later years.

One of those is 82-year-old swimmer Graham Johnston. When he's not racing or getting ready to race, he's in the stands, checking out the other swimmers with an expert eye.

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U.S.
3:21 am
Fri July 26, 2013

5 Men Accused Of Stealing Credit, Debit Card Numbers

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:33 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's move now to what appears the largest case of electronic data theft ever uncovered by U.S. law enforcement. As NPR's Steve Henn reports, U.S. attorneys in New York and New Jersey have unveiled indictments against a Russian-dominated hacking conspiracy.

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NPR Story
2:52 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Zimmerman Juror Says He 'Got Away With Murder'

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:33 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another juror has now spoken out about the George Zimmerman trial. The only minority on the panel says she believes the neighborhood watch volunteer who killed Trayvon Martin got away with murder. Zimmerman was acquitted earlier this month. During the trial, the judge ordered that jurors' identities remain confidential; and that order has not yet been lifted.

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StoryCorps
8:03 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For A Young Paramedic, Saving A Life Meant A Lifelong Bond

Rowan Allen (right) saved Bryan Lindsay's life in 1991, after an accident left Bryan, then 7, with a severe head injury.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 5:33 am

Twenty-two years ago this summer, Bryan Lindsay was riding his bike when he was hit by a van and almost killed. He was 7 years old.

Rowan Allen was the paramedic on the scene that day. "When the call came in, it was just before my shift ended that day," Rowan recalls on a visit to StoryCorps in New York. "The first instinct was, 'Oh man, right before we get off.' And then the dispatcher comes back on the air and he says, 'Child struck.' That just changes everything. And luckily, we were just a couple blocks away.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder Seeks Continued Oversight Of Texas Election Laws

Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the National Urban League annual conference on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke Associated Press

Attorney General Eric Holder says the Justice Department will ask a federal court to subject Texas to the same kind of scrutiny that was required of it by a section of the Voting Rights Act struck down last month by the Supreme Court.

In Shelby County v. Holder, the high court rescinded Section 5 of the 1965 act, which required several states including Texas that had a history of voter discrimination to get "pre-clearance" from the federal government before changing their election laws.

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Code Switch
4:32 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

After Zimmerman Verdict, Activists Face A New, Tougher Fight

Protesters hold hands in the rotunda outside Florida Gov. Rick Scott's office after it closed for the evening last Friday.
Phil Sears AP

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 9:24 am

Phillip Agnew was blindsided by the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. The decision came down late on a Saturday night. Agnew was expecting the neighborhood watchman who killed Trayvon Martin to be found guilty.

Agnew, 28, leads a group of young activists called the Dream Defenders, which formed in Florida last year in the weeks following Trayvon's shooting death. It was one of the many groups that sprouted up in cities across the country in response to the shooting.

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Business
3:39 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

U.S. Carmakers Are Riding High, But Detroit May Not Feel It

Jeff Caldwell, a chassis assembly line supervisor, checks a vehicle on the assembly line at the Chrysler Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit on May 8.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 5:19 pm

The news out of Detroit has been grim of late, but there are some bright spots coming from one corner of the Motor City. On Thursday, General Motors posted its 14th straight profitable quarter since emerging from bankruptcy. Ford announced its 16th consecutive profitable quarter Wednesday, and Chrysler is expected to offer good news soon as well.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

North Carolina Set To Compensate Forced Sterilization Victims

Sterilization victim Lela Dunston, 63 (seated front), following a meeting of the Governor's Eugenics Compensation Task Force in North Carolina in 2012.
Karen Tam AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:31 pm

North Carolina could become the first state to compensate people who were forcibly sterilized in programs across the country that began during the Great Depression and continued for decades, targeting individuals deemed feeble-minded or otherwise unfit.

In a proposed budget, lawmakers have set aside $10 million for one-time payments to an estimated 1,500 people still alive who were part of a state program that sterilized 7,600 men, women and children from 1929 to 1974. The amount of each payout would be determined by how many people came forward.

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Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Undocumented Immigrants With Criminal Records Face Uncertain Future

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

In all the current talk about helping 11 million undocumented immigrants come out of the shadows, there's typically broad agreement about who shouldn't get a path to legal residence: law breakers. There are lists of offenses that rule people out, whether it's under existing immigration law or under the immigration bill the Senate passed, or under President Obama's program to help the so-called Dreamers - the ones who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

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Law
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Holder: DOJ Wants To Oversee Texas' Voting Laws Again

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder has announced an aggressive new strategy in response to a Supreme Court ruling last month overturning a key part of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. The Justice Department is starting in Texas, where it is asking a court to force the state to get federal approval before making any election changes - using a different part of the law.

Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Tries To Make Amends For Forced Sterilizations

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In the early 1900s, more than half of the states in the U.S. passed laws allowing people to be sterilized against their will. North Carolina's eugenics program was particularly aggressive. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized often because they were poor or mentally ill.

Now, North Carolina has done more than any other state to make amends, as we hear from Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

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Education
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Common Core Could Be Disrupted As States Drop Out Of PARCC

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

In addition to Georgia, a handful of other states — Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, North Dakota, and Alabama — have dropped out of or scaled back their participation in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC) consortium. Florida's education commissioner is mulling a similar decision. We discuss what it could mean for the success of the standards.

Education
3:12 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Georgia The Latest State To Back Out Of K-12 PARCC Tests

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:43 pm

This week, Georgia announced it is withdrawing from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness in College and Career (PARCC), one of two consortia developing standardized tests for the Common Core. The Core is the set of national K-12 education standards in math and English language arts that has been adopted by 46 states. Georgia officials say the cost of the tests is too high and many schools don't have the computer technology the tests would require.

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