U.S. News

Sports
3:10 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Pitching Like It's 1860, Teams Play Ball With Vintage Flair

The Essex Base Ball Organization, a vintage baseball league, holds its games on a farm in Newburyport, Mass.
Edgar B. Herwick III for NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 1:54 am

The Red Sox square off against the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park on Saturday in Game Six of the American League Championship Series. Forty miles north, another league is putting the finishing touches on its season.

This particular brand of baseball comes with a curious twist.

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The Two-Way
8:30 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Shedding Stereotypes, More Librarians Show Us Their Tats

Jennifer Galpern, August
Kate Fischer Rhode Island Library Association

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:56 am

Is it their love of ink?

There seems to be something about tattoos that appeals to quite a few librarians.

Back in 2009 there was the Texas Library Association's "Tattooed Ladies of TLA" calendar that raised money for libraries damaged by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Police Capture 2 Florida Prison Escapees Who Used Phony Documents

Convicted killer Joseph Jenkins in a photograph taken on Sept. 20 by the Orange County,Fla., Sheriff's Office — after he escaped from prison. Jenkins went to the Orange County Jail to register as a felon.
AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 6:23 pm

(Updated 8:10 p.m. ET)

The Associated Press reports that two convicted murderers from Florida who used phony documents to escape prison were arrested Saturday night without incident at a motel in Panama City, Fla.

According to the AP:

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Education
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

With Major Debt, Philadelphia Schools Cut Back On Nurses

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

Philadelphia Public Schools have been facing a funding crisis. There have been a series of layoffs, including assistant principals, school nurses and counselors. Some funding has come through to rehire hundreds of staffers, but not any new nurses. Host Scott Simon speaks with Eileen DiFranco, who has been a school nurse in the city for more than 23 years, about the situation.

Sports
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Ultimate Frisbee Puts On Its Game Face

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

After years of jokes, Ultimate Frisbee players say they're finally getting some respect. This year the sport received provisional recognition from the International Olympic Committee, and Ryland Barton of KWBU in Waco, Texas, reports that this weekend its national championship will be broadcast live on ESPN3.

Sports
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Teams Take A Step Closer To World Series

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

The Cardinals beat the Dodgers Friday night, and Detroit and Boston are back at Fenway on Saturday. Host Scott Simon talks with Howard Bryant of ESPN about the games and what's ahead for the World Series.

Economy
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

What The World Thinks Of The Dollar In Light Of Recent Politics

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

The political instability over funding the U.S. government and raising the debt ceiling could have international financial implications. Host Scott Simon speaks with Matthew Goodman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies about how emerging economies view the dollar after the current debt crisis.

Politics
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Can The GOP Put Its Internal Feuds Behind It?

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

This week, politicians and pundits of almost all persuasions seemed to agree that the Republican Party took a hit from the shutdown. But Jonah Goldberg of the National Review sees a path forward. Hos Scott Simon talks with Goldberg about how the party can put its schisms behind it.

Around the Nation
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Do-It-Yourself Library Brings Neighborhood Together

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

On the other hand, and we say that a lot in the news business, libraries with books on shelves are still with us, maybe closer than you think.

DINA MORENO: I can see the library from my kitchen window, just up. It's sort of out of the way, but I can just see it and I see people constantly going through there.

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Around the Nation
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Bookless Library In Texas Aims To 'Break Down The Barriers To Reading'

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. San Antonio's newest library doesn't look very bookish. It's got neon orange walls, a play area for children that has glowing screens, and it abounds with desktop computers, iPads, eBooks and laptops. They call it BiblioTech because it's completely digital. There is no paper in this library.

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Sports
4:44 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Calculating The Worth Of The Redskins Brand

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:40 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Washington, D.C.'s football team has been under increasing criticism for keeping an old team name that's a racial epithet. I usually don't say it. I will now - for the purposes of information. The Washington Redskins. That name's been hotly debated, criticized for being a racial slur, but defended by the team's owners as actually being a kind of tribute to Native Americans.

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Politics
3:39 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Money For Dam Project In Shutdown Deal Riles Conservatives

The Olmsted Locks and Dam project is under construction on the Ohio River between Illinois and Kentucky.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

This week's congressional compromise to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling had a few other provisions as well.

One of them allows additional spending on a lock and dam project on the Ohio River between Kentucky and Illinois.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Why Scientists Are Trying Viruses To Beat Back Bacteria

Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes severe diarrhea, can be difficult to treat with antibiotics.
Stefan Hyman University of Leicester

Not all viruses are bad for us. Some of them might even help up us fight off bacterial infections someday.

Naturally occurring viruses called bacteriophages attack specific types of bacteria. So researchers at the University of Leicester decided to try and take advantage of phages' bacteria-destroying powers to treat infections with Clostridium difficile, a germ that that can cause severe diarrhea and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

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It's All Politics
3:00 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Conservative Group Backs Challenge To 'Liberal' McConnell

Matt Bevin speaks during the 133rd Annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Fancy Farm, Ky., on Aug. 3. Bevin, a Louisville businessman, is challenging Sen. Mitch McConnell in the 2014 Republican Senate primary.
Stephen Lance Dennee AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:37 pm

Days after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell helped negotiate a deal to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling, a prominent conservative group endorsed his primary challenger.

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It's All Politics
3:00 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

After Budget Fight, No Sign Of Cease-Fire

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks to reporters following a meeting with President Obama at the White House on Oct. 2.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

As it dragged on in recent weeks, the debate about the budget, the debt ceiling and Obamacare felt like an epic battle.

But now that it's over, there's reason to think it was actually only another skirmish during the long period of partisan warfare Americans have become accustomed to.

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Around the Nation
2:43 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Texas Gun Advocates Prepare For New Alamo Showdown

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. In San Antonio on Saturday, 1,000 activists are expected to rally at the Alamo. They are gun owners gathering to protest what they say have been illegal efforts by police to restrict their right to openly carry guns. To help make the point, they will be protesting armed. Ryan Lloyd of Texas Public Radio reports.

RYAN LLOYD, BYLINE: Earlier this week in the central Texas town of Temple, C.J. Grissom(ph) was outside firing off a few rounds.

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Around the Nation
2:43 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Serpent Experts Try To Demystify Pentecostal Snake Handling

Pastor Jamie Coots holds a snake at Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church of Middlesboro, Ky.
NGO

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:09 pm

Two weeks ago, NPR reported on a group of Pentecostals in Appalachia who handle snakes in church to prove their faith in God. The story got us thinking: Why are the handlers bitten so rarely, and why are so few of those snakebites lethal?

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NPR Story
11:48 am
Fri October 18, 2013

With Shutdown Over, Scientists Assess the Damage

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky. Ira Flatow is away. After nearly three weeks, the shutdown is finally over. The Smithsonian is open, national parks have opened up their gates, and federal labs all over the country are turning on their lights. But not everyone is back to business as usual. Many scientists who were about to start their field season in Antarctica had their trips cancelled or postponed.

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Fri October 18, 2013

India Arrests Crew Of U.S. Ship For Carrying Weapons

Indian policemen escort crew members of a U.S.-owned ship MV Seaman Guard Ohio outside a court in Tuticorin, in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, on Friday.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 1:56 pm

The crew of a U.S.-owned ship has been arrested at a port in India for allegedly trying to enter territorial waters illegally carrying what's been described as a "huge cache" of weapons.

The 35 crew members on MV Seaman Guard Ohio, owned by Washington, D.C.-based AdvanFort, were detained on Saturday by the Indian Coast Guard. The vessel is currently at anchor in the port of Tuticorin in the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu.

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Code Switch
11:02 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Asian-Americans To Evangelicals: We're Not Your Punch Line

A joking Facebook post by Saddleback Church's Rick Warren was the catalyst for a pointed letter from some 700 evangelical Asian-Americans.
Donna McWilliam AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:48 am

"We the undersigned, are distressed about the continuing divide that persists in the North American evangelical church in the area of racial harmony."

That's the first line of a four-page open letter to American Evangelicals ("On Cultural Insensitivity and Reconciliation in the Church") from a coalition called Asian American Christians United. The letter was released earlier this week.

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Politics
9:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Shutdown Nightmare's Over, Is Capitol Hill Still Dreaming?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later this hour, our Friday features, the Barbershop guys will be here and we'll meet a mother who says she and her husband did everything their conservative church asked of them, including campaign against same-sex marriage, until they realized their own son is gay. And she'll tell us how she's now trying to reconcile her love of her church with her love of her son. That's Faith Matters and that's coming up.

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Shots - Health News
8:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Painkiller Overdose Deaths Strike New York City's Middle Class

What's in your neighbor's medicine cabinets may influence overdose risk in the community.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:12 am

Drug overdoses are usually thought to afflict mainly the poor and troubled. But it looks like OxyContin and other opioid painkillers are changing the picture.

People in stable, middle-class neighborhoods are also dying from opioid overdoses, a study in New York City finds.

Opioids have become among the most popular drugs of abuse in the past decade, with deaths from overdoses of oxycodone, hydrocodone and codeine eclipsing those from heroin and cocaine combined.

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The Two-Way
5:05 am
Fri October 18, 2013

San Francisco BART Transit Workers Strike

Roxanne Sanchez (left), president of Service Employees International Union Local 1021, speaks during a news conference in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 11:36 am

It's going to be a frustrating Friday commute in San Francisco after the workers for the region's largest transit system, known as the BART, went out on strike.

The San Jose Mercury News reports:

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Economy
1:25 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Declining Gas Prices Pump Up A Shaky Economy

A motorist fuels up at a service station in Springfield, Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:34 am

In recent weeks, economists have been worrying about the negative impact of the now-ended government shutdown and potential debt crisis.

But away from Capitol Hill, the economy has been getting a big boost: Gasoline prices have been declining, week after week. In some parts of the country, a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline is now down to less than $3 a gallon — a price most Americans haven't seen in three years.

And any time the pump price starts dropping, consumer spirits start rising.

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Around the Nation
1:22 am
Fri October 18, 2013

In Flooded Colorado, Immigrants' Livelihoods Washed Away

The Eastwood Village mobile home park in Evans was wiped out in September's floods.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 11:15 am

In flood-ravaged Colorado, much of the recovery has focused on rebuilding roads and bridges to mountain towns cut off by last month's floods. But take a drive east to the state's rolling plains, and a whole new set of staggering problems unfolds in farm country.

Living In Limbo

A woman named Claudia, who doesn't want to use her last name because of her immigration status, is sitting on a couch in the lobby of a shabby hotel in Greeley, about an hour's drive northeast of Denver.

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Code Switch
1:08 am
Fri October 18, 2013

The Whitest Historically Black College In America

Deirdre Guyton, the school's director of alumni affairs, is proud of Bluefield State College's history and wants to preserve it. Here, she holds up a photo of the school's football team from 1927 to 1928, when it was the best black college team.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:13 pm

It opened in the late 19th century as the Bluefield Colored Institute, created to educate the children of black coal miners in segregated West Virginia. Although it still receives the federal funding that comes with its designation as a historically black institution, today Bluefield State College is 90 percent white. The road that separates those realities is as rocky as any story of racial transition in post-World War II America.

We went to the campus of Bluefield State to see what campus life was like at this unusual college.

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Economy
4:01 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Wilted Reputations Left By Shutdown And Default Threat

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday, in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 3:35 pm

President Obama said Thursday that the government shutdown and threat of default did unnecessary damage to both the U.S. economy and the country's reputation abroad.

Standard & Poor's concluded that the disruption subtracted about $24 billion from the economy and is likely to trim more than half a percentage point off growth in the final three months of the year.

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The Salt
3:54 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

With Shutdown Over, The Race To Feed Low-Income Seniors Is On

Meal deliveries to some low-income seniors stopped during the shutdown, and distributors are now racing to get meals out.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:50 pm

The USDA is back to funding its meals program for low-income seniors. That's good news for those who depend on the weekly food deliveries, which stopped during the government shutdown.

Across Michigan, tens of thousands of seniors turn to dozens of agencies for assistance. In Grand Rapids, where we first reported on the program freeze, a local agency is playing catch-up, relying on volunteers to fill the void.

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Around the Nation
3:54 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Nearly Two Years Later, A Controversial Rape Case Is Reviewed

Daisy Coleman, now 16, looks at trophies and other awards she's won for beauty pageants, dancing and sports. She has attempted suicide at least twice since waking up in freezing temperatures on her doorstep.
Peggy Lowe KCUR

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 7:55 pm

Nearly two years after allegations of a sexual assault rocked a small Missouri town, the case may be reopened.

A county prosecutor in Maryville, Mo., has requested that an independent attorney look at accusations of rape and other charges against two former high school athletes — despite his earlier decision to drop the case.

The Internet activist group Anonymous, which crusaded for another high-profile rape case, is taking credit for this turnaround.

The Events

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Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tourists And Business Welcome Reopened National Parks

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:54 pm

National Parks are reopening after the government shutdown. Many visitors and nearby businesses had been frustrated that Washington's inability to reach a budget deal had also meant the ruin of vacations and the loss of tourism business.

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