U.S. News

Sports
1:33 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Pickleball, Anyone? Senior Athletes Play New Games And Old

Hazel Trexler-Campbell throws spray-painted horseshoes during the Senior Games in Cleveland on July 23.
Benjamin Morris for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:23 am

A lot of what you'd see at the National Senior Games looks familiar if you've ever watched the Summer Olympics: There's track and field, basketball and swimming. At the Summer Olympics, however, you will not hear voices in the crowd cheering "Go, Grandma!"

Everyone at these games is over 50, and they play some sports that will likely never appear at the Olympics. Here's a sample:

Pickleball

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U.S.
1:12 am
Wed July 31, 2013

In Florida, A Clash Over Exhuming Bodies At Reform School

Metal crosses mark graves at the cemetery of the former Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Investigators in Florida using ground-penetrating radar and soil samples say there are nearly 100 unmarked graves on the grounds.
Michael Spooneybarger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:32 am

Researchers at the University of South Florida are fighting with the state over access to the grounds of a now-closed reform school.

For decades, the Dozier School for Boys was notorious for the harsh treatment boys received there. Now, a forensic anthropologist and her team want permission to exhume dozens of bodies they found in unmarked graves, but are meeting resistance from state officials.

White House Boys

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Code Switch
5:08 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Harry Belafonte, Jay Z And Intergenerational Beef

Beyonce (left) and Jay Z arrive at a "Justice for Trayvon" rally in New York earlier this month.
Mary Altaffer AP

Hip-hop beefs don't burn any slower or get any more bizarre.

Last year, Harry Belafonte, the acclaimed singer, actor and civil rights activist, was awkwardly quoted by a foreign reporter in a Q&A about modern celebrity and social responsibility. The always-outspoken Belafonte didn't really hold back.

Q: Are you happy with the image of members of minorities in Hollywood today?

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The Salt
4:01 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite Legal Blow, New York To Keep Up Sugary Drink Fight

On Tuesday, a state appeals court called New York City's ban on supersized soda unconstitutional.
Allison Joyce Getty Images News

A state appeals court on Tuesday rejected New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's attempt to limit the size of sugary beverages sold in his city. But in a statement, Bloomberg and the city's top lawyer, Michael Cardozo, called the decision a "temporary setback" and vowed to appeal.

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It's All Politics
4:00 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

GOP Puzzles Over Liz Cheney Senate Run

Liz Cheney during a 2010 appearance on the CBS news program Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:40 pm

Liz Cheney's decision to move to deep red Wyoming and launch what promises to be an expensive primary challenge against GOP Sen. Mike Enzi continues to baffle.

And it's not just pollsters — whose early surveys show her trailing the popular Enzi badly in a state where an overwhelming majority of voters say they don't view her as a "Wyomingite" — who are scratching their heads.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:08 pm

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

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Law
3:35 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Citing Supreme Court, Judge Awards Benefits To Same-Sex Widow

Another barrier to recognition of same-sex marriage appears to have fallen. On Monday a federal judge ordered a law firm to pay survivor's benefits to the widow in a same-sex marriage, and on Tuesday the law firm said it was happy to comply and would not appeal.

The decision is the latest in a series of court rulings equalizing benefits for legally married same-sex couples in the aftermath of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

What The Manning Verdict Says About Edward Snowden's Future

An activist wears pictures of leakers Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning during a demonstration against the electonic surveillance tactics of the NSA, in Berlin on Saturday.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:42 am

In the wake of today's verdict acquitting Bradley Manning of aiding the enemy, the natural question is, what does this say about Edward Snowden's future?

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Planet Money
2:34 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Despite The Buzz, Local Food Has A Small Economic Impact

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

The local food movement has received a lot of attention both for changing diets and buying habits. But has the movement has become a significant economic force?

Planet Money
2:33 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Better Accounting Will Boost U.S. GDP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The size of the U.S. economy will be getting a bump tomorrow. That's when the latest gross domestic product statistics come out. The number will be larger, not because our exports have improved or because of new jobs, it's because of an accounting change. David Kestenbaum with our Planet Money Team explains.

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U.S.
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Where Do Drugs For Lethal Injections Come From? Few Know

A new law in Georgia makes information about where the state got its supply of lethal injection drugs a secret.
Ric Feld AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:45 pm

Several states are dealing with a shortage of lethal injection drugs and have had problems getting enough to carry out executions. In Georgia, lawmakers passed a measure that makes information about where the state got its supply a secret.

The Lethal Injection Secrecy Act says that the identity of people or companies that manufacture, supply or prescribe drugs used in executions is a state secret. But attorneys for death row inmate Warren Lee Hill are challenging the state over whether that law is constitutional.

Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

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All Tech Considered
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Scott Simon On Sharing His Mother's Final Moments On Twitter

Simon's parents on their wedding day.
Courtesy of Scott Simon

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:33 pm

If you are among NPR host Scott Simon's 1.3 million Twitter followers, you likely know the news. Simon's mother, Patricia Lyons Simon Newman, entered a Chicago hospital on July 21 and died Monday night. She was 84 years old.

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Law
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Bradley Manning Acquitted Of Most Serious Charge

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

A military judge has acquitted Army Pvt. Bradley Manning of the most serious charge against him — aiding the enemy — but found him guilty of 19 criminal charges including violation of the Espionage Act and theft of government property. Manning was accused of the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history after he passed thousands of war documents and diplomatic cables to the website WikiLeaks.

Business
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

White House Proposes Major Changes To Corporate Tax Code

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

President Obama traveled to Tennessee on Tuesday, another event in his recent push to emphasize jobs and the economy.

Politics
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Weiner Stays In Mayoral Race, Despite Calls To Drop Out

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

Despite mounting pressure from rivals and even former supporters, Anthony Weiner is giving no indication that he'll drop out of New York City's race for mayor. Recent events — including a Quinnipiac poll showing that a majority of New York City voters want him to make a quick exit — have made his uphill battle even steeper.

Politics
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Some GOP Senators Want To Use Shutdown To 'Defund' Obamacare

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:41 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

Now, to one storm brewing in Congress right now. It's about the funding of government operations and the health care law. It's less a feud between parties as one within the Republican Party.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith explains.

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Shots - Health News
1:29 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

A Bit Of Thought Makes Finding Out Medical Risks Less Scary

Angelina Jolie took a genetic test to find out her risk of breast cancer, and had a preventive double mastectomy.
Alastair Grant PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:39 pm

Would you want to know your risk of getting heart disease? Diabetes? Or an inherited form of breast cancer?

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All Tech Considered
11:12 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Report: MIT Didn't Target Swartz; Missed 'Wider Background'

Internet activist Aaron Swartz at a rally in January 2012.
Daniel J. Sieradski Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:42 pm

In a long-awaited chronicle of its involvement in the prosecution of the late Internet activist Aaron Swartz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology officials released a 180-page report saying administrators never "targeted" the programmer and committed no wrongdoing. But the report raises questions about existing university policies and whether MIT should have stepped in to actively support Swartz, rather than take its "position of neutrality."

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Parenting
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Widows: Getting Your Kids On Board With The Dating Game

Dating after losing a spouse can come with a world of complications. And if you're a parent, it can be especially hard to explain new relationships to children. Two moms who lost their husbands share how they ventured back into dating and how their children reacted.

Law
10:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

What's Behind Falling Incarceration Rates?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we'll talk about elections set for Zimbabwe, where 89-year-old President Robert Mugabe is hoping to win yet another term despite - or maybe because of - what many people call an increasingly abusive dictatorial style of government. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes. But first, we want to talk about an issue that's become a central focus of activists in this country - it's the incarceration rate.

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Shots - Health News
7:01 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Doctors Increasingly Ignore Evidence In Treating Back Pain

Unfortunately, that CT scan probably won't help.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:18 am

The misery of low back pain often drives people to the doctor to seek relief. But doctors are doing a pretty miserable job of treating back pain, a study finds.

Physicians are increasingly prescribing expensive scans, narcotic painkillers and other treatments that don't help in most cases, and can make things a lot worse. Since 1 in 10 of all primary care visits are for low back pain, this is no small matter.

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Suspected Nazi War Criminals Living In Limbo In U.S.

John (Ivan) Kalymon talks about his deportation outside his Troy, Mich., home in this 2009 photo. Kalymon is one of at least 10 suspected Nazi war criminals who remains in the United States despite attempts to deport him.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:38 pm

At least 10 people suspected of committing Nazi war crimes were never deported from the U.S. despite losing the American citizenship they gained when they immigrated, The Associated Press reports. A main cause of the delay is simple: Their European homelands don't want them back.

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U.S.
3:25 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Will Whitey Bulger Testify? It's Still Unclear

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:46 am

The defense in the Whitey Bulger trial began Monday. Still unanswered is the big question: Will the reputed mob boss testify?

The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Police Arrest Woman Suspected Of Vandalizing Washington Icon

Green paint was discovered in two chapels inside the National Cathedral in Washington on Monday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:07 pm

Police in Washington, D.C., say a woman has been arrested, suspected of splattering green paint across the organ at the National Cathedral, the Episcopalian church that has long served as the country's spiritual home.

CNN's Dan Merica tweeted this photo of church:

NPR member station WAMU reports the arrest follows a series of similar acts of vandalism across Washington.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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Code Switch
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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It's All Politics
3:45 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama And Clinton Meet For 'Friendship' Lunch

President Obama has lunch with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on the patio outside the Oval Office on Monday.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Talk about a power lunch.

President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met Monday for a private lunch that immediately sparked speculation about what it means for the 2016 presidential race.

The visit marked at least the second time the two have met privately since Clinton left the State Department earlier this year. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, met with Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for a private White House dinner in March.

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U.S.
3:27 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

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Law
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama Administration Looks To Mend Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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All Tech Considered
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

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