U.S. News

Space
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

NASA Marks Curiosity's First Year On Mars

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 9:26 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

NASA's latest and largest rover celebrates its first anniversary on Mars today. One year ago, Curiosity came to a gentle landing in Gale Crater. Ever since, it's been chugging around what appears from orbit to be the mouth of an ancient river system. It's looking for signs that the environment on Mars might once have been suitable for life.

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Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

From Cops To Lawyers, Indian Country Copes With High Crime

Tuba City, Ariz., corrections supervisor Robbin Preston in front of the new jail on the Navajo Nation. The recidivism rate was so high, Preston couldn't keep track of it.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Arizona's Monument Valley is known for its red sandstone buttes and spires, but now it's notorious for something else: crime. The Navajo Nation is one of the most violent reservations in the country. According to FBI reports, over the past five years, more rapes were reported on the Navajo Nation than in San Diego, Detroit or Denver, among other cities.

The U.S. attorney's office tries to take on the most violent crimes, but it often lacks enough evidence to prosecute. And because of antiquated tribal codes, Navajo courts can only order someone to serve one year in jail.

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Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Running Program Uses Goal-Setting To Help Homeless

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Cities usually have an array of services to combat homelessness. These include shelters, soup kitchens, job assistance programs. But there's a new trend in helping the homeless: running.

Greg Collard of member station WFAE in Charlotte, North Carolina, reports on how running has changed the lives for some of the city's homeless people.

GREG COLLARD, BYLINE: You might wonder, how do you get the homeless interested in running? Well, here's a big enticement: free shoes. That grabbed the attention of Matthew Hoffman.

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Food
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

FDA Issues First Standards For 'Gluten-Free' Labeling

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

The Food and Drug Administration has issued the first standards for what food companies can label "gluten-free." Audie Cornish speaks to Dr. Peter Green, the director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, about the FDA announcement.

Law
3:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Closing Arguments Begin In 'Whitey' Bulger Trial

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:24 pm

Jurors in the James "Whitey" Bulger trial got to listen to several hours of closing arguments in a Boston federal courtroom on Monday. Bulger is the former mob boss accused of litany of crimes including racketeering, murder, extortion and money laundering.

All Tech Considered
11:03 am
Mon August 5, 2013

The Effort To Write Laws For Your Digital Life After Death

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:21 pm

Time was when the belongings you left behind after death were tangible — furniture, jewelry, letters — and financial property, which hundreds of years of experience have taught executors how to handle. Today, some of the most valuable keys to our lives and identities exist digitally, and are technically owned by companies like Google or Facebook.

For the digital assets stored on shared servers in the cloud, legal systems have yet to catch up to help decide who controls your data when you're dead. And uniform laws around control of these assets could help.

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Remembrances
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

Sports
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

NFL: Is The Game Getting Safer?

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

As fans and teams get ready for another season of football, a new study sheds light on game safety. Host Michel Martin talks with Jesse David of Edgeworth Economics about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries are getting results.

Religion
10:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sikh Says No Room For Hate, A Year After Temple Shooting

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You might have caught some preseason football action over the weekend. Football season is almost here, which means it's also time to think again about how to make the game safer. We'll tell you about a new independent study about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries, especially brain injuries, is achieving any results. That's coming up later.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Baseball Suspends Alex Rodriguez For 211 Games

He's waiting to hear his fate: New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez.
John Angelillo UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:49 pm

(We most recently updated this post at 6:48 p.m. ET.)

New York Yankees' slugger Alex Rodriguez, one of baseball's brightest stars and its highest-paid player, will be suspended through the 2014 regular season because he violated parts of baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, the league said today.

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Around the Nation
3:21 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Remembering 6 Shooting Deaths At Wisconsin Sikh Temple

A year ago, a white supremacist shot and killed six people at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis.
Morry Gash AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:41 pm

One year ago Monday, Wade Michael Page, a gunman with links to neo-Nazi groups, went to a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., and killed six worshippers. Family members, law enforcement and the larger community marked the anniversary over the weekend.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker praised the Sikh community for calling for greater understanding and peace.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:24 am
Mon August 5, 2013

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation.
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 7:49 am

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Education
4:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 5:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

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History
12:10 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Museum Tries To Save The Plant Where Rosie Riveted

The former Willow Run Assembly Plant, in Ypsilanti Township about 40 miles west of Detroit, is where Rosie the Riveter worked during World War II.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

The historic Michigan factory where the iconic Rosie the Riveter and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers during World War II could face the wrecking ball two months from now.

A modest nonprofit is trying to raise enough money to salvage some of the massive plant, which Ford sold to General Motors after the war. The Yankee Air Museum figures the factory is the perfect place to start anew, after a devastating fire destroyed its collections in 2004.

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National Security
9:33 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Snowden Case Illustrates Decline In U.S.-Russia Relations

President Obama met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Northern Ireland in June.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 4:38 pm

U.S.-Russia relations hit a new low this week, when Moscow ignored U.S. requests and gave temporary asylum to a man who leaked classified documents on U.S. government surveillance programs.

Many in Congress are complaining that the Edward Snowden case is just the latest example of how the Kremlin is thumbing its nose at the White House.

The Obama administration famously reset relations with Russia when Dmitry Medvedev was president. But now that Russian President Vladimir Putin is back in the Kremlin, it seems to be having a more difficult time.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sun August 4, 2013

FBI Official: Internet A Key Recruiting Tool For Sex Traffickers

Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI's Criminal Investigative Division, speaks during a news conference at FBI headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Evan Vucci Associated Press

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:49 am

  • Hear the full interview with FBI's Ron Hosko on "Weekend Edition"

Ron Hosko, the assistant director of the FBI's Criminal Investigative Division, tells NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday that the Internet has become a key tool for recruitment of child prostitutes and that cutbacks at the federal and local levels have made it harder to clamp down on the problem.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Sun August 4, 2013

One Dead After Driver Plows Through Crowded L.A. Boardwalk

Police and fire officials respond after a car drove through a packed afternoon crowd along the Venice Beach boardwalk in Los Angeles on Saturday.
Maarten Smitskamp ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:31 am

A speeding car plowed through a crowd at Los Angeles' popular Venice Beach boardwalk, killing one person and injuring 11 others before he fled the scene. The driver apparently surrendered to police later.

The Associated Press reports that security video shows the driver of the black Dodge initially parked his car along the boardwalk on Saturday, and then minutes later got back in the vehicle and sped through the crowd. Hundreds of pedestrians were sent scrambling.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Sun August 4, 2013

State Department Extends Closure Of Embassies

An American flag flies over the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem on Sunday.
Lior Mizrahi Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 2:46 pm

Update At 4:40 p.m. ET:

State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki says Sunday that the embassy and consulate closures will be extended:

In a statement, Psaki says the decision was taken "out of an abundance of caution" and the it was "not an indication of a new threat stream, merely an indication of our commitment to exercise caution ... to protect our employees."

The statement says:

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The Sunday Conversation
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Former Child Trafficking Victim Now Mentors Others

Sheila White ultimately worked through her trauma with the help of a case manager, who helped her understand exploitation.
Sheila White

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Sheila White grew up in a troubled home. She was abused and ended up in foster care as a teenager. Not long after that, feeling low and confused, she met a man who soon became her pimp.

During the years she was forced into sex work, White was exposed to extreme violence. But, she explains, some victims have a hard time leaving their exploiters.

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National Security
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Senate Democrats Proposa FISA Court Reform

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The NSA surveillance programs have raised questions about the balance between privacy and national security. Much of the debate has focused on something called the FISA court, named after the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. It was this court that approved the NSA spying programs that have caused such a stir. This past week, a group of Democratic senators put out a plan to change how the court works. Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico is one of those lawmakers. He told me that the problem with the court is that it's secret.

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Sports
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Pro-Bowl Struggles To Gain Popularity

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A lot of sports have all-star games: baseball, basketball, hockey - the best of the best facing off against each other. But football's all-star game, well, it's having a little bit of trouble. The Pro Bowl, as it's called, has struggled for audiences. So, this past week, the NFL and the player's union declared new rules which they hope will fix the problems. And it just so happens that NPR's Mike Pesca has some thoughts about all of this. Hey, Mike.

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Law
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Sex-Trafficking Sting Covers 76 Cities

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

One hundred children were rescued in the recent three-day sting. Host Rachel Martin talks with Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI's criminal investigations division, about child sex trafficking the U.S.

Around the Nation
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Winging It:: How To Travel Alone

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's one thing to go out and explore a new city or a new country with your partner or a group of friends; quite another to take on this kind of adventure all by yourself.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: This week on our travel segment, Winging It, we discuss the art and science of traveling solo. Janice Waugh is the author of "The Solo Traveler's Handbook."

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Law
5:03 am
Sun August 4, 2013

Nidal Hasan Murder Trial To Start This Week

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:39 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
4:29 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Online And Anonymous: New Challenges To Prosecuting Sex Trafficking

John Ryan, CEO of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, speaks during a press conference about a child sex trafficking operation on Monday in Washington.
Brendan Smialows AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 11:50 am

Monday, the FBI announced the success of a three-day, multicity child sex trafficking operation. The seventh and largest of its kind, the raid recovered 106 teenagers and arrested 152 pimps. Aged 13 to 17, almost all of the young people found were girls.

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Race
3:26 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Preserving African-American Cemeteries

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 4:29 pm

Under a popular park in Washington, D.C., there is a 19th century burial ground that was once the largest African-American cemetery in the city. Advocates want to protect the park from further development and create space for a memorial. But how many other such burial grounds are in similar straits, and how have others solved the problem of co-existing with development and gentrification?

National Security
3:26 pm
Sat August 3, 2013

Week In News: Terror Alert

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 4:29 pm

The U.S. State Department issued a warning to Americans traveling abroad this weekend, as well as to many embassies and consulates, that it has learned of the possibility of a terrorist attack. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic.

The Two-Way
10:16 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Pentagon Papers Leaker Daniel Ellsberg Praises Snowden, Manning

Daniel Ellsberg was a military analyst in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret study of U.S. government decision-making in Vietnam.
Paul J. RIchards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 2:49 pm

Daniel Ellsberg, the military analyst who in 1971 leaked the top-secret Pentagon Papers detailing the history of U.S. policy in Vietnam, tells NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday that unlike Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, he "did it the wrong way" by trying first to go through proper channels — a delay that he says cost thousands of lives.

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Code Switch
7:54 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Obama Warms To Speaking Personally About Race

President Obama speaks about the George Zimmerman acquittal nearly a week after the ruling.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 11:46 am

On race, Barack Obama often says he is not president of black America, but of the United States of America. Though he has not avoided the subject during his time in office, he tends not to seek out opportunities to discuss racial issues.

"He wanted to address them in a time and a way that accomplished specific objectives," says Joshua Dubois, who ran the White House's faith-based initiatives during Obama's first term.

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Politics
5:45 am
Sat August 3, 2013

August Recess Leaves Unfinished Business

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 11:46 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Scott Simon is away. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Members of Congress are back in their home districts this morning at the start of a five-week summer recess. They left town with more of a whimper than a bang. They leave a whole lot of unfinished business. We're joined now by NPR congressional correspondent, Tamara Keith. Welcome.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: Let's start with what the Congress did accomplish. There was student loan legislation. What else?

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