U.S. News

Business
3:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The History — And Future — Of Cable's Bundling

Though you'd never see it listed on your monthly cable bill, nearly every channel you get has a secret price.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:13 pm

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U.S.
3:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

For One-Time Tech Exec, Leading D.C. Charity Is No Small Job

Patty Stonesifer once watched Martha's Table serve food to the homeless outside the Washington, D.C., offices of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. When the top post at the charity came open, she knew it was the job for her.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:43 pm

On a recent morning, Patty Stonesifer sat cross-legged on the floor of a day care classroom, laughing as pre-schoolers clambered into a fire truck made out of a cardboard carton.

This is a far cry from Stonesifer's old life. She made her fortune in the tech world, where she rose through the ranks at Microsoft to become its highest-ranking female executive.

Later, she became the founding CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — the largest philanthropic organization in the world, with huge, global goals and an endowment of $34 billion when she left in 2008.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Monument To Hell' Is No More: Cleveland Rapist's House Is Torn Down

The house of Ariel Castro, which was found to have served as a prison for three women for years, was reduced to rubble Wednesday.
Brian Bull WCPN

The house of kidnapper and rapist Ariel Castro, the man who was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years last week, has been razed. Michelle Knight, one of the three women for whom the house became a prison for nearly a decade, was on hand for the demolition Wednesday.

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History
2:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Renaissance Garden' Highlights Medicinal Plants

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:48 pm

This summer, the New York Botanical Garden is featuring an exhibit called Wild Medicine: Healing Plants around the World. The most beautiful and interesting part is a small scale recreation of the 16th century Italian Renaissance Garden at Padua, the site of one of the earliest and most important medical schools. (This piece originally aired on Weekend Edition on July 6, 2013.)

Law
2:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Attorneys Assigned To Fort Hood Shooter Want To Back Out

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 3:48 pm

There was an unexpected hold-up on day two of the court martial of Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at Fort Hood. His "standby" attorneys have told the judge that don't believe it's ethical for them to keep assisting a man who they believe is trying to get the death penalty.

Europe
2:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Cancellation Of Putin Meeting Highlights U.S.-Russia Tensions

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

President Obama has canceled a planned summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. The decision comes not long after Russia announced it was granting temporary asylum to Edward Snowden. He faces charges in the U.S. that he leaked secret documents on government surveillance programs. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, today's reversal is just the latest sign that U.S.-Russia relations are not in a good place.

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The Salt
2:01 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Bring Home The Bacon Or Put It In A Meat Locker?

Time for a meat locker? One Flickr user's freezer after purchasing a large share of a pig.
Cowgirl Jules via Flickr

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:44 am

Why buy 1 pound of hamburger meat from a local farmer when you can buy 5 pounds — plus another 20 pounds of stew meat, steaks and roast — for as little as half the price of what it all goes for at the market?

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Arizona Firefighter's Widow May Fight City Over Benefits

Juliann Ashcraft, wife of late firefighter Andrew Ashcraft, receives a U.S. flag during a memorial service in July. Ashcraft says the city has refused to pay full benefits for her husband's death, calling him a seasonal employee.
David Kadlubowski AP

The widow of a man who died fighting a wildfire this summer as part of a "hotshots" team based in Prescott, Ariz., says her attempts to be paid her late husband's lifetime benefits have been denied. The city's explanation is that Andrew Ashcraft, 29, was a seasonal employee, Juliann Ashcraft said Wednesday.

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Health Care
10:56 am
Wed August 7, 2013

'Paying Till It Hurts': Why American Health Care Is So Pricey

a system instead of 20, 40 components, each one having its own financial model, and each one making a profit," says New York Times correspondent Elisabeth Rosenthal." href="/post/paying-till-it-hurts-why-american-health-care-so-pricey" class="noexit lightbox">
"We need a system instead of 20, 40 components, each one having its own financial model, and each one making a profit," says New York Times correspondent Elisabeth Rosenthal.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 1:05 pm

It costs $13,660 for an American to have a hip replacement in Belgium; in the U.S., it's closer to $100,000.

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Education
10:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Are Race-Based Goals In Education Helpful?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We wanted additional perspective about this, so we've called Krista Kafer. She's an education policy expert. She's the executive director of Colorado's Future Project. That's a think tank associated with the Independent Women's Forum. Welcome to you, Krista Kafer. Thank you so much for joining us.

KRISTA KAFER: It's great to be here.

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Race
10:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Are Lower School Achievement Levels A Civil Rights Issue?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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On Aging
10:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Never Too Old To Take Gold

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And speaking of sports, you might have heard our interview with John Tatum last month. He's the 94-year-old swimmer from Washington, D.C. who was getting ready for three events at the National Senior Games. We wanted to see how we did, so we caught up with him after the games wrapped up.

JOHN TATUM: Well, I got two gold medals and one silver medal, and I call that a successful outing. Although, I wanted to win them all.

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Health
10:06 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Will Changing Cancer Terminology Change Treatment?

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:51 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
5:25 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

DOJ Sues Bank Of America Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Justice Department is bringing civil charges against one of the nation's largest banks. The government alleges Bank of America made false statements about the quality of $850 million worth of home loans. Those loans were then sold to investors. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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Business
4:26 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

With An Industry In Turmoil, Why Buy A Newspaper Company?

The Washington Post is now in its seventh straight year of declining revenues, says the paper's chairman, Donald Graham. Rather than continue to watch the paper struggle, Graham and Publisher Katharine Weymouth decided to look for a buyer.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:20 pm

Donald Graham, chairman of The Washington Post Co., is the son and grandson of its leaders for the past 80 years. And along with his niece, publisher Katharine Weymouth, Graham admitted in a video on The Post's website that the family simply didn't have the answers to questions about the paper's future.

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U.S.
3:49 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Border Drug Busts Putting Strain On Texas County's Budget

Trains that once deposited travelers for shopping and dining in dusty Sierra Blanca, Texas, no longer stop here. Interstates further eroded the local economy as more people chose to live and shop in El Paso, 85 miles away.
G.W. Schulz The Center for Investigative Reporting

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

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Environment
3:46 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Wells Are Running Dry In Parts Of Kansas

Nate Pike fears that wells, like this one that supplies his ranch with water, will dry up completely after years of water pumping and irrigation in Kansas.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:27 pm

Imagine enough water to fill a couple of Great Lakes, but spread under some of the driest parts of eight Western states. That was the High Plains Aquifer 60 years ago.

But now, Nate Pike, whose been riding the dry rolling ranch lands south of Dodge City, Kan., for most of his 80 years, can't even go fishing at his favorite spring called St. Jacob's Well.

"And that thing had a lot of water in it. It never went down, never changed," he says. "But as you can see now, I can't believe I can't see the water from up here."

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

California Takes Drivers' Orders For 'Vintage' Car Plates

The real deal: California's new vintage car tag program would let drivers emulate icons of cool such as actor Steve McQueen, seen here in his Ford-Cobra roadster in 1963.
Dick Stroebel AP

Thousands of California drivers are ordering specialty vintage license tags for their cars, in a program that lets people choose new tags based on designs from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. The throw-back plates will let drivers put iconic blue, black, or yellow plates on their vehicles.

And in a nod to way things used to be, the tags' letters and numbers will be stamped, not screen-printed, as John Rabe reports for Southern California Public Radio.

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It's All Politics
2:49 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

With 'Post' Purchase, High-Tech Continues Its March On D.C.

Jeff Bezos, CEO and founder of Amazon.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 3:44 pm

It's kind of an obvious thought: Jeff Bezos' purchase of The Washington Post is Richard Nixon's revenge.

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It's All Politics
2:32 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Cory Booker: Supermayor Or Self-Promoter?

Newark Mayor Cory Booker speaks about his Senate campaign, outside the Grove Path Station in Jersey City, N.J., last month.
Ashlee Espinal The Jersey Journal/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

In one week, voters in New Jersey go to the polls in a special primary election for a U.S. Senate seat.

No one on the ballot has more name recognition than Cory Booker, the 44-year-old mayor of Newark, who is considered a rising star in the Democratic Party. But Booker's critics say he's been more focused on his own ambitions than on governing New Jersey's largest city.

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Education
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Florida To Reopen Dark Chapter In State's History

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Florida officials today voted to reopen a dark chapter in the state's history. Governor Rick Scott and his cabinet voted to allow researchers to exhume some 90 unmarked graves at a state-run reform school. The Dozier School for Boys was closed two years ago, but over its 100-year history, it was notorious for physical abuse. As NPR's Greg Allen reports from Miami, the hope is that today's decision will unearth answers about the children who died there and why.

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Law
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Fort Hood Shooter A 'Shrunken' Presence In Court Martial

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

The court martial of Army Maj. Nidal Hasan began Tuesday at Fort Hood in Texas. Hasan is defending himself and told jurors that the evidence will show he was the man who killed 13 soldiers in 2009. But he said that the trial will not tell the whole story.

Sports
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

A-Rod Prepares To Battle For His Career, Reputation

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Both the boo-birds and Smartphone cameras were working overtime at Chicago's U.S. Cellular Field last night as the New York Yankee's Alex Rodriguez came to bat.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD BOOING)

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Research News
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Study: Rising Military Suicide Rate Not Linked To Deployment

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A new study out today finds that the rising number of suicides in the military is not caused by deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. The paper says mental health and alcohol abuse are much stronger indicators that a service member will commit suicide. As NPR's Larry Abramson reports, that finding runs smack into other evidence that says there is a connection.

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Media
2:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

'Washington Post' May Find Conflicts In Amazon Coverage

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The sale of The Washington Post to Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos could bring up conflict between the owner's interests and the paper's editorial independence. I talked about some of those issues with longtime media executive and consultant Merrill Brown. Among his jobs, he was a reporter and then corporate executive for The Washington Post. Later, he was founding editor-in-chief of msnbc.com. I asked Brown what he sees as potential conflicts of interest with Bezos at the helm of The Post.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

U.S. Sues Bank Of America Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 2:33 pm

The Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it was suing Bank of America for allegedly lying to investors about the riskiness of about $850 million worth of mortgage-backed securities back in 2008.

According to a press release by the Justice Department, the action is part of efforts of the Obama administration's Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force's RMBS Working Group.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

New Magazine Takes A Grown-Up Look At Adoption

The new online magazine Gazillion Voices was begun in the hopes of shaping a new national conversation on adoption, the website says.
Gazillion Voices

The complex and interconnected topics of adoption, race, and culture will form the backbone of a new online magazine that is starting this week. Gazillion Voices was begun with those goals in mind, says Kevin Vollmers, who created the magazine as an extension of his blog, Land of Gazillion Adoptees.

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Parenting
10:11 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Parents On The Pros And Cons Of Homeschooling

Many people laud the benefits of homeschooling. But the practice also has critics. Host Michel Martin talks with a group of parents about their personal experiences: homeschooling advocate Michael Farris, dad Paul Hagen and mom Shawn Spence.

Education
10:07 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Brother Wants Parents To Stop Siblings' Homeschooling

College student Josh Powell says he had huge gaps in his education from being homeschooled. Now, he's advocating for his siblings to attend public school, despite a religious exception given to his family. Host Michel Martin talks to Powell about his experience.

The Two-Way
8:35 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Boy Who Was Parents' Best Man Saturday Has Died

Logan Stevenson, the terminally ill two-year-old who acted as best man at his parents' wedding Saturday, has died, according to media reports and his mother's Facebook page. The family's story touched many people who learned about Logan's parents' rush to get married in time for him to be part of the ceremony.

"For such a small person, he has touched thousands of people," one of Logan's aunts, Kellie Young, told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review last week.

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