U.S. News

Code Switch
2:38 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Why Didn't The Store Just Let Oprah Buy The $38,000 Handbag?

On the list of things to be outraged about at the moment, I'll admit this isn't at the top: The Swiss tourism office apologized to Oprah on Friday because she wasn't allowed to buy a $38,000 designer handbag while recently shopping in Switzerland. Poor lil' Oprah. *sad face*

It does make me wonder, though, can you ever be rich enough or famous enough or beautiful enough to not be racially profiled while shopping?

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It's All Politics
5:40 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Obama's Challenge: Answer Snowden Without Seeming To

President Obama sought to address concerns over NSA surveillance measures at a White House news conference on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Heading into Friday's news conference, President Obama had a delicate balancing act before him: how to acknowledge widespread concerns about National Security Agency surveillance without in any way legitimizing the actions of leaker Edward Snowden.

The best course, the president decided, was to acknowledge that Snowden's revelations to some degree forced his administration to accelerate and expand a review of the federal government's surveillance activities.

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Politics
4:02 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Transcript: President Obama's News Conference

A transcript of President Obama's Aug. 9 news conference, as released by the White House:

THE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, everybody. Please have a seat.

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The Salt
3:45 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:36 pm

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

NCAA Will Stop Selling Player Jerseys, Takes Web Shop Down

A screenshot posted on Twitter by ESPN analyst Jay Bilas shows the results for a search for "manziel" — shirts and jerseys matching Texas A&M star Johnny Manziel. The NCAA says it will stop selling such products.
Jay Bilas Twitter

Stung by fresh accusations that the NCAA makes money off college athletes, the organization promised this week to stop selling jerseys and similar products. The move came days after ESPN analyst Jay Bilas tweeted pics of the NCAA Shop selling jerseys corresponding to current players' numbers.

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Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Sexual Assault Center Ransacked — Then Mysteriously Repaid

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Last week under cover of night, burglars broke into an office building in San Bernardino, California.

CANDY STALLINGS: It was about 10:30 on July 31st, and I received a call from my alarm company.

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Code Switch
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

From Wrong To Right: A U.S. Apology For Japanese Internment

John Tateishi was incarcerated at Manzanar internment camp in California from age 3 until he was 6.
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream for a more equal America. But there's another anniversary looming: 25 years ago this week, the Japanese-American community celebrated a landmark victory in its own struggle for civil rights.

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Politics
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Texas Congressman Pulled In Two Directions Over Immigration

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

Second term GOP congressman Blake Farenthold is being targeted during Congress' summer recess by advocates of the Senate's immigration bill. Activists are organizing petitions and a demonstration at Farenthold's "open house" at his Corpus Christi office. And opponents are fighting back.

Sports
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Is Clint Dempsey Too Good For U.S. Soccer?

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

The best soccer leagues in the world are in Europe and even Americans want to be good enough to play in them. Clint Dempsey accomplished that, playing in England's Premier League, but now he's coming home. In a move that surprised a lot of people, Dempsey has joined the Seattle Sounders. Audie Cornish talks to sportswriter Stefan Fatsis for more.

National Security
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Obama Supports Some Senators' Call For NSA Reform

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

At his press conference on Friday, President Obama promised more transparency about the government's secret national security surveillance programs. The president expressed support for some reform efforts being considered in Congress and called for the release of more documents that explain how and why the surveillance effort works and whether it safeguards the privacy of Americans.

Technology
2:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Encrypted Email Services Shuttered Amid Snowden Investigation

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 3:45 pm

Lavabit, an encrypted email service reportedly used by former government contractor Edward Snowden, ceased operations yesterday. In a message to users, the owner of Lavabit hinted that the company was the target of a request for information about customers from the federal government. He said he chose to shut down his service instead of becoming "complicit in crimes against the American people." Later in the day, another secure email service, called Silent Circle, also shuttered itself.

The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Mexican Court Frees Drug Lord Convicted In Killing DEA Agent

Mexican federal police patrol Friday near Puente Grande State prison (background) in Zapotlanejo, Jalisco state, Mexico, where former top Mexican cartel boss Rafael Caro Quintero was released.
Hector Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:28 am

A Mexican court has thrown out the conviction of infamous drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, 28 years after he was convicted and imprisoned for the 1985 kidnapping and murder of U.S. DEA agent Enrique Camarena.

Quintero had been serving a 40-year sentence for torturing and killing Camarena, but the court voided the sentence on a technicality — saying he should have been tried in a state court instead of the federal court where he was convicted.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Fri August 9, 2013

I Just Killed My Wife, Miami Man's Facebook Page Says

Derek Medina in a booking photo taken by the Miami-Dade Police Department.
handout Reuters /Landov

"I'm going to prison or death sentence for killing my wife. Love you guys. Miss you guys. Take care. Facebook people you'll see me in the news."

The Miami Herald and other news outlets are reporting that 31-year-old Derek Medina of South Miami apparently posted that Facebook message Thursday morning, along with a photo of a woman's "twisted, bloodied body lying on a linoleum floor."

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Verdict Today? Wait Continues At Trial Of 'Whitey' Bulger

A courtroom sketch of James "Whitey" Bulger (left) and defense attorney J.W. Carney, Jr.
Margaret Small AP

It's Day 4 of jury deliberations in the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger, the now-83-year-old Boston gangster who is accused of 19 murders and racketeering.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

West Coast Kidnap Suspect May Have Explosives, Police Warn

A sign for missing California teenager Hannah Anderson hangs on a fence at El Capitan High School in the Lakeside neighborhood of San Diego County.
Sam Hodgson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:50 pm

Update At 2:40 p.m. ET: Sheriff: Car Recovered

San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said Friday that the car belonging to the suspect has been found near Cascade, Idaho. He said the license plate had been removed, but the Vehicle Identification Number, or VIN, showed a match as belonging to James Lee DiMaggio.

Gore said that horseback riders in the mountains northeast of Boise believe they saw DiMaggio, who is suspected of killing Christina Anderson and abducted at least one of her children.

Here's our earlier post:

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The Two-Way
5:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Powerball Jackpot Winners Include 16 N.J. County Workers

Paul White of Ham Lake, Minn., and his partner Kim VanReese. White bought one of the three winning tickets in Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball lottery. While one-third of the jackpot is about $149.4 million, he's chosen to take his share in a lump sum rather than spread out over many years. That lump sum is $86 million, which after taxes will be about $58 million.
Eric Miller Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 7:03 am

One of the three tickets that ended up being winners of Wednesday's $448.4 million Powerball jackpot belongs to a group of 16 workers at the Ocean County Vehicle Maintenance Department in New Jersey, according to local news outlets.

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The Salt
1:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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Around the Nation
1:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

In Paducah, Artists Create Something From Nothing

Fiber artist Freda Fairchild at the door of her Studio Miska (Dear Little Mouse).
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:06 am

How do you fix a neighborhood? What do you do about crime and drugs and the once-lovely old houses that are falling down? The answer in Paducah, Ky., was to turn it into a special place for artists to live, work and sell.

Paducah, already home to the National Quilt Museum, is far west on the edge of Kentucky, on the Ohio River. Lowertown, so-named for being downriver from downtown Paducah, was once quite elegant — 25 square blocks. But in time it became a difficult place to admire.

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All Tech Considered
1:03 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Why Aren't More Girls Attracted To Physics?

Girls are more likely to take high school physics if they see women in their communities working in science, technology, engineering and math, a new study finds.
Dominik Pabis iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:05 pm

You don't need to be a social scientist to know there is a gender diversity problem in technology. The tech industry in Silicon Valley and across the nation is overwhelmingly male-dominated.

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Business
1:03 am
Fri August 9, 2013

The Changing Story Of Teens And Cars

To teens today, cars aren't important in the same way they were in American Graffiti, the 1973 film directed by George Lucas.
Lucasfilm/Coppola Co/Universal

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:29 pm

This is the first of a series of stories produced in collaboration with Youth Radio on the changing car culture in America.

When you're a teenager, there are many things you desperately want to find: friends, fun, a future, freedom.

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StoryCorps
11:17 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Surviving Tragedy: 'It Brought Us Closer'

Ondelee at home before his prom. In Chicago, prom night is a big deal. Fifty percent of African-American Chicago high school students end up dropping out of high school before senior year. Ondelee graduated from Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago on June 15, and is planning to attend college.
Carlos Javier Ortiz Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:06 am

One night in 2009, Ondelee Perteet and a friend went to a party in his hometown of Chicago.

"A lot of people, they started throwing gang signs. And, you know, I got into an argument with somebody in the party, and that's when I got shot in the face," Ondelee said during a recent visit to StoryCorps with his mother, Detreena.

He was 14.

"I got to the hospital, and the doctor came back, and he said, 'We're sorry, but he's never going to move his arms and legs again,' " said Detreena, 47. "It just tore me apart."

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Bill Clinton, Winfrey Receiving Presidential Medal Of Freedom

The White House cited Oprah Winfrey's philanthropy and work to expand opportunities for young women in awarding her a Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 4:14 am

President Obama named 16 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom today. President Bill Clinton and Oprah Winfrey are among the brightest stars.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the highest civilian honor, which was first presented by President John F. Kennedy and has been given to 500 individuals from diverse corners of the country.

From the White House, here is a list of the recipients, along with short bios:

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Politics
4:00 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Can Congress Figure Out How To Rescue The Post Office?

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Jamesa Euler delivers mail in the rain in Atlanta in February.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

The U.S. Postal Service lost some $16 billion last year and continues to bleed red ink. Congress has been unable to agree on a rescue plan.

The latest proposal would allow the post office to end Saturday delivery in a year and enable it to ship wine and beer.

The Postal Service's woes are familiar: People don't really send letters anymore, so first-class mail is down, and Congress makes the post office prepay future retiree benefits to the tune of $5.5 billion a year.

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The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Yemen Official: New Round Of Drone Strikes Target Al-Qaida

A Yemeni soldier speaks with a motorcyclist amid tightened security near Sanaa International Airport on Tuesday.
Mohammed Huwais AFP/Getty Images

A Yemeni official says 12 suspected al-Qaida militants have been killed in the Arab country in three separate U.S. drone strikes Thursday.

The Associated Press quotes the official as saying that the first drone attack killed six alleged militants in central Marib province, while the second and third killed six more in Hadramaut province.

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The Two-Way
3:24 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

MLB Warns Of 'Absurd' Results Of San Jose's Antitrust Suit

In its efforts to get the Oakland A's to relocate to their city, San Jose officials filed an antitrust lawsuit against Major League Baseball this year. The Oakland stadium is seen here in a file photo.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:20 pm

Calling a lawsuit's potential results "absurd" for cities around the United States, Major League Baseball asked a federal judge to dismiss a challenge to its antitrust exemption filed by San Jose, Calif. The city filed the suit to press its case for relocating the Oakland A's there.

NPR's Richard Gonzales filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Around the Nation
3:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

'Dream 9' Win Small Victory In Fight To Stay In U.S.

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

A group of young people, known as the Dream 9, won a small victory yesterday in their fight to remain in the U.S. legally. They were released from a federal detention center in Arizona. All nine grew up in the U.S. but returned to their native Mexico, then publically tried to cross back into this country last month.

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Around the Nation
3:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Laid To Rest: A Proper Burial For The Poor

In lieu of names, this headstone was engraved with a quote: "We grow afraid of what we might forget. We will find peace and value through community in knowing that we belong to each other. Dedicated to the Citizens of Bernalillo County."
Carrie Jung KUNM

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

On a blisteringly hot summer afternoon, about 40 people gather at the Evangelico Cemetery in southwestern Albuquerque. Deacon Pablo Lefebre leads the service and begins with a prayer

"Because God has chosen to call our brothers and our sisters from this life to himself," he says, "we commit their bodies to the earth, its resting place. For we are dust, and to dust we shall return."

This isn't your average funeral. The light gray casket about to be lowered into the ground is filled with the cremated remains of 87 county residents.

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Education
3:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Common Core Curriculum Brings Big Shifts To Math Instruction

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To big changes now in the classroom. Most states have adopted new math and literacy guidelines for students from kindergarten through 12th grade. They're called the Common Core standards, and they rewrite the rules of what students should know grade by grade. When it comes to math, not only are the standards changing, some of the work kids will be doing and bringing home will actually look different.

To explain, here's NPR's Cory Turner.

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Politics
3:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Hillary Clinton Still Mum On 2016, But She Hasn't Slowed Down

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

More than six months have passed since Hillary Clinton stepped down from her position as Secretary of State. At the time she said she was eager for some down time — to rest and do the things she didn't normally have time for, like catch up on episodes of Love It or List It. But Amy Chozick of the The New York Times, who has been following Clinton's transition out of office, tells Melissa Block that there hasn't been much R & R in her agenda.

Business
3:13 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Fannie Mae Posts $10 Billion Profit In Second Quarter

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today, mortgage giant Fannie Mae announced it made a $10 billion profit this past spring. That's a remarkable turnaround considering the government had to bail out Fannie Mae, along with Freddie Mac, when the housing bubble burst five years ago. It's certainly good news for taxpayers. It's also good news for homebuyers who count on the two companies to back most of the country's home loans.

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