U.S. News

Business
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Why Do Cargo Planes Have Spottier Safety Records?

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Audie Cornish talks with Alan Levin, a Bloomberg News reporter covering aviation safety and the Federal Aviation Administration, about cargo plane safety and why cargo plane accidents appear to be increasing worldwide

Around the Nation
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Summer Nights: Dancing In Chicago

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Do you want to learn the samba in Chicago, or perhaps the Lindy hop or the waltz? Maybe you want to know exactly how one gets jiggy. Well, all you have to do is wander into Grant Park in the summer, Chicago's Summer Dance is the nation's largest annual outdoor dance series. And for our series, Summer Nights, NPR's Sonari Glinton stopped by Grant Park for a tango.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Just after work on a Thursday evening, you can see crowds forming in the Spirit of Music Garden on the edge of Grant Park.

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Sports
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Marion Bartoli Retires From Tennis At The Top Of Her Game

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And Audie Cornish. Just 40 days after winning the women's singles title at Wimbledon, Marion Bartoli of France announced on Wednesday that she's retiring from tennis at age 28. Bartoli now joins a relatively short list of top athletes who decided to call it quits in their prime. Sports writer Stefan Fatsis joins us now, as he does most Fridays. Hey there, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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Animals
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Bill Would Keep Lead Ammunition Out Of Condors' Diet

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A bill that would ban hunting with lead ammunition in California is stirring debate. Advocates for the endangered California condor say the ban is the only way to keep the struggling species going. Some hunters question the environmental impact of lead ammunition and they say a ban would leave them with few convenient options. Here's reporter Aaron Schrank.

AARON SCHRANK, BYLINE: Inside a diagnostics room at the Los Angeles Zoo, the condor recovery team is taking an X-ray.

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Law
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

It Will Be Up To Congress To Change Automatic Sentencing

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

The Justice Department has called for prison sentencing reform — but it's really Congress that would have to carry it out. The time may be right: Crime is down, and even conservatives favor sentencing reform to save money.

National Security
3:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

NSA Accused Of Repeatedly Violating Privacy Rules

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:22 pm

Documents released to the Washington Post by former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden show the agency overstepped privacy rules.

The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Painter Created Million-Dollar Forgeries In Queens Garage, Officials Say

An anonymous painter in New York City created dozens of art forgeries, which sold for more than $80 million, according to prosecutors. The man isn't facing charges — but those who helped sell his Abstract Expressionist canvases as the work of artists such as Jackson Pollock and Robert Motherwell are in trouble.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Joel Rose reports:

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Education
9:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

The STEM Gender Gap

The number of girls and women studying the sciences has steadily increased each year, but there is still a gender gap in higher education and the work force. Researchers Andresse St. Rose and Catherine Riegle-Crumb and Linda Kekelis, executive director of Techbridge, discuss the social and environmental factors that contribute to this disparity.

StoryCorps
12:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Happy Dodson (left) and Taz Roman are president and treasurer, respectively, of the Connecticut chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:36 am

Happy Dodson and Taz Roman are bikers. Not cyclists, but the leather jacket and chained wallet kind of bikers. They're also members of a group called Bikers Against Child Abuse.

The nonprofit, with chapters across the U.S. and in some parts of Europe, accepts referrals from parents, guardians, police, social workers and other agencies. Whenever those kids don't feel safe, they can call Happy, Taz and their other biker friends, who come straight to the child's house.

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All Tech Considered
12:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
ShareATT YouTube

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:31 pm

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All Tech Considered
12:54 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Tornado Tech: How Drones Can Help With Twister Science

Drones can provide information about temperature, humidity and pressure that current radar systems can't provide. Above, the Talos drone, which has a 15.5-foot wingspan.
Jamey Jacob Oklahoma State University

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:30 am

Oklahoma was hit particularly hard by two massive outbreaks this year in what's been another deadly season of tornadoes in the U.S. Despite technology and forecasting improvements, scientists still have plenty to learn about how and why tornadoes form.

Currently, one of the best ways for researchers to understand how tornadoes form is to chase them. So off they go with mobile science laboratories, rushing toward storms armed with research equipment and weather-sensing probes.

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Animals
12:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Katrina Boydon and her mustang Spirit. She adopted the horse as an orphaned foal with a rattlesnake bite on his hoof.
Will Stone KUNR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:52 am

Drive about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev., into the barren scrubland and you're sure to see "wild" horses — more than 1,000, in fact. Just not in the wild.

Laura Leigh calls several mares to the edge of the dusty corral. She's a regular at Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. The horses eagerly rub their muzzles against her, their coats hot from the midday sun.

"We got to get you a home, don't we?" she says to one of the horses. "This one will let you scratch her withers and put your hands on her legs. You're adorable, aren't you?"

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It's All Politics
3:48 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Semantic Gymnastics: GOP In Tug Of War Over Delegate Rule

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus opens last year's convention in Tampa, Fla., on Aug. 27.
Glen Stubbe MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:36 am

Remember back when President Bill Clinton argued that his truthfulness about his affair with intern Monica Lewinsky depended on the meaning of the word "is"?

Thought so.

Though the topic may be decidedly less salacious, the Republican Party is embroiled in its own semantics gymnastics this week as its national committee members gather in Boston for their summer meeting.

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Code Switch
3:44 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Bayard Rustin: The Man Who Organized The March On Washington

Activist Bayard Rustin points to a map during a press conference four days ahead of the March on Washington in August 1963.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 2:03 pm

The trailblazing strategist behind the 1963 March on Washington will this year be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. That's a long way from the days when civil rights activists counted on Bayard Rustin's hard work, but tried to push him aside because he was gay.

For 60 years, Rustin fought for peace and equal rights — demonstrating, organizing and protesting in the United States and around the world.

'Strategic Nonviolence'

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Sports
3:16 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

The Dodgers' 'Magical' Rise From The Cellar

Los Angeles Dodgers' Adrian Gonzalez (center left, holding helmet) is congratulated by teammates along with Yasiel Puig (No. 66) after Gonzalez hit a game-winning RBI double and Puig scored during the 12th inning of their game against the New York Mets on Wednesday.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the hottest team in baseball. They've won 40 of their last 48 games, and Wednesday night, they came from behind in dramatic fashion to beat the New York Mets in 12 innings.

It's a remarkable turnaround for a team that was near the cellar before the All-Star break. Now, they're calling Dodgers Stadium the Magic Castle. Attendance is up, TV ratings are up, star power is up. And the on-field play is "magical," according to legendary announcer Vin Scully.

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Shots - Health News
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Getting People Out Of Nursing Homes Turns Out To Be Complicated

Dorothy Holmes, back home with her new dog, Jack.
Martha Bebinger WBUR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Two years ago, Dorothy Holmes, then 75, was in the cozy pink bathroom of her home getting ready to shower when she fell. It's the type of accident that's common among older Americans — and it's often the very thing that triggers the end of independence.

"I got a big spot on my head; it almost conked me out," Holmes says in her soft voice.

She heard her husband come down the hall, "and when he turned the corner all I heard was, 'Oh God, honey, what did you do now?' After that I don't know anything 'cause I passed out," Holmes recalls.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

GOP Divided Over Whether It Needs Better Outreach, Nominees

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

The Republican National Committee meets this week in Boston with lots to argue about — if they choose to do so. There's immigration and Obamacare resistance and the 2016 presidential nominating system.

Law
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Pentagon Adds New Measures To Combat Sexual Assault

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Under pressure from Congress, the Pentagon has announced additional measures to combat sexual assault. The Pentagon continues to resist proposals that would take prosecution of sexual assault out of the chain of command, but some lawmakers say that's the step that would make a difference.

Education
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

FAMU Marching Band Gets To Take Field Again After Hazing Death

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:18 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Members of the famed marching band at Florida A&M University learned today that they will once again be allowed to perform. It's been nearly two years since the band was last heard. The group was suspended following the hazing death of one of its drum majors. As Lynn Hatter of Florida Public Radio reports, the university says it will take work to prove times have changed.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Ladies and gentlemen, the Florida A&M University marching band.

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Animals
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

After Losing His Raccoon, Man Takes His Appeal To Governor

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Mark "Coon Rippy" Brown, of Gallatin, Tenn., became an Internet sensation for posting videos online of himself bantering, dancing, even showering with his pet raccoons. He's now using his Internet fame to garner support, in an effort to get his pet raccoon Rebekah back from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, which recently seized the critter. It is illegal in Tennessee to possess native animals captured in the wild.

Economy
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Fears Of A Diminished Stimulus Send Stock Market Falling

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The stock market usually likes good news about the economy, but that's not always the case. This morning, stocks opened down sharply just after the government announced a surprisingly large drop in initial claims for unemployment benefits. In fact, claims fell to the lowest level since before the recession and the Dow Jones Industrials ended the day down 225 points, a decline of 1.5 percent.

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Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Students Return To School In Moore, Okla., As City Rebuilds

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:43 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For students in Moore, Oklahoma it's not just new backpacks and pencils this year. For many, it's entirely new schools and homes. A tornado ripped through the community nearly three months ago. It destroyed two schools, killed seven students and 18 other people in the city. And tomorrow, students return to class.

Rachel Hubbard, of member station KOSU, checks in with Moore to see how the community is doing.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On Its C-Max Hybrid

A Ford C-MAX hybrid vehicle goes through assembly at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, last November.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:05 am

(Updated 8:40 p.m. ET)

Ford on Thursday backpedaled on the stated fuel economy for its C-Max hybrid after customer complaints and an EPA investigation found that the vehicle wasn't living up to its advertised 47 mpg.

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Beauty Shop
10:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

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All Tech Considered
12:57 am
Thu August 15, 2013

The Next Disaster Scenario Power Companies Are Preparing For

Part of the Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant in Lewiston, N.Y., is seen from the air on Aug. 14, 2003, during a massive power outage that stretched from New York to Detroit and into Canada.
David Duprey AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:49 am

In the 10 years since sagging power lines in Ohio sparked a blackout across much of the Northeastern United States and Canada, utility engineers say they have implemented measures to prevent another such event in the country's electric grid.

But there is one disaster scenario for which the power companies are still unprepared: a massive attack on the computer networks that underlie the U.S. electric grid.

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Business
12:56 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Pent-Up Demand Is Boosting Home Sales, But Can It Last?

Carpenters work on a housing site in Brandywine, Md., on May 31. Pent-up demand for homes could create jobs and help the struggling U.S. economy.
Gary Cameron Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:33 pm

Six years ago, the U.S. housing market plunged off a cliff. Now prices are bouncing back up — sharply in many markets.

That has some real estate analysts saying 2013 may mark the turning point — when pent-up demand will revive the housing sector and boost the broader economy.

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It's All Politics
4:02 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

A Lover Of Horse Races, And Horses: Remembering Jack Germond

Jack Germond, who died Wednesday at 85, was one of the legendary "boys on the bus" covering presidential politics.
David Burnett/Random House AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Political reporter Jack Germond smoked and loved martinis and red wine and fine food and betting on horses — he lived life large and didn't suffer phonies.

But here's the thing about Germond, who died Wednesday at age 85: He liked politicians. That's something you don't find much among reporters today.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Gmail Users Shouldn't Expect Privacy, Google Says In Filing

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:13 pm

People who use Gmail and other free email systems have no reasonable expectation of privacy, according to papers filed in a U.S. district court by lawyers for Google. The filing was made in June, when Google moved to dismiss a case accusing it of breaking federal and state laws by scanning users' emails to help target its advertising campaigns.

In making its case, Google compared sending an email to other types of communications where privacy cannot be expected:

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Project To Fix Quote On MLK Memorial Hits Snags

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In the nation's capitol, a project to remove a disputed quotation from Martin Luther King Jr. memorial has stalled. The work may not be finished in time for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington later this month. NPR's Allison Keyes tells us the issue is a finishing process that wasn't in the government's contract.

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Around the Nation
3:27 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Flood Insurance Rates Skyrocket In Coastal Communities

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Some homeowners in Louisiana and other coastal communities are now seeing their premiums for federal flood insurance skyrocket. For some residents, that means paying annual premiums more than 10 times their current rate. The cause? In part, a new law passed by Congress last year requiring the National Flood Insurance Program to raise premiums for some homeowners in high risk areas. The program has been struggling financially in recent years in the aftermath of major storms, like Hurricane Sandy.

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