U.S. News

Business
4:45 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For Tipped Workers, A Different Minimum Wage Battle

States may have their own higher wage laws, but the federal minimum wage for tipped workers is $2.13 an hour.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:14 am

The federal minimum wage for tipped workers has been $2.13 since 1991. That pay rate tends to get lost in the larger debate over whether to raise the national minimum wage for nontipped workers, which is $7.25 an hour.

In theory, the money from tips should make up the difference in pay — and then some. But according to a White House report, tipped workers are more than twice as likely as other workers to experience poverty.

Living On Tips

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The Impact of War
3:07 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

For U.S. Vets, Iraq's Newest Conflict Awakens Complex Emotions

A decade ago, U.S. soldiers were fighting and rebuilding in the Iraqi cities of Mosul and Tikrit. The past few weeks have seen those cities, among others, fall to the Sunni militant group ISIS. Here, a member of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces stands guard Thursday near an ISIS checkpoint in Mosul.
Karim Sahib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 6:45 am

In Iraq this weekend, government forces launched an offensive against the Sunni militant group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. On Sunday, the government said it was using Russian-made jets to attack Sunni militants in the northern cities of Tikrit, the hometown of the late dictator Saddam Hussein, and Mosul. Both cities remain under insurgent control.

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U.S.
3:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Employees' Pay Cut By Denied Overtime, Deductions For Equipment

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 4:11 pm

Thousands of Americans each year lose portions of their wages to wage theft. NPR's Arun Rath talks with Tia Koonse, of the UCLA Labor Center, about efforts to curtail the problem.

U.S.
3:05 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Hard-To-Change Mistakes Led To Successful 'No-Fly List' Case

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 4:11 pm

This week, a federal judge ruled that the government's no-fly list process is unconstitutional. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Abe Mashal, one of the 13 plaintiffs in the case.

The Two-Way
8:08 am
Sun June 29, 2014

Obama Administration Seeks Change In Law To Speed Deportations

Children detainees sleep in a holding cell at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing facility in Brownsville,Texas.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 12:33 pm

President Obama will ask Congress for about $2 billion in emergency funds and for a change in the law in an effort to stem the tide of Central American immigrants flooding the Southern border, according to a White House official.

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Law
6:12 am
Sun June 29, 2014

Justices To Rule In Hobby Lobby Contraception Case

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 10:23 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Don Gonyea sitting in for Rachel Martin. Tomorrow is the last day of the current Supreme Court session. And the legal community is awaiting decisions in two big cases still pending before the high court.

One involves Obamacare and its requirement that health care plans include coverage for contraceptives, and the other speaks to labor organizing in the public sector. Joining us to set the stage on these potentially landmark cases is NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Hi, Nina.

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The Salt
3:01 am
Sun June 29, 2014

'Artisanal' Ramen? Instant Noodles Get A Healthy Dose Of Hacking

(Top left, clockwise) Macmen N' Cheese; chocolate ramen; udon and egg. (Bottom row) Ramen fritatta; cannellini beans and spinach; and southwest taco from the book Rah! Rah! Ramen.
Sara Childs/ Courtesy of Interactive Direct

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:09 am

If there's one thing college students know well, it's a belly full of instant ramen.

"Ramen always has been and always will be a college staple," says Rick Brandt, a recent University of Iowa graduate.

And it's not just college students who turn to the noodles in lean moments: When your food budget is reduced to quarters dug out of the couch, or when hunger pangs strike at ungodly hours, ramen noodles may come to the rescue.

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It's All Politics
4:19 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

8 Signs Obama Is Feeling Trapped In The Presidency

Sometimes you just need to pay for your own ice cream.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 8:16 am

Past presidents have described the White House as "the crown jewel of the federal penal system" and "the great white jail." And lately, President Obama has been increasingly sending signals he's feeling claustrophobic in the presidential bubble.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Technology
2:59 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

Harley Hopes An Electric Hog Will Appeal To Young, Urban Riders

Harley-Davidson riders reveal Project LiveWire, the first electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle, during a ride across New York City's Manhattan Bridge on June 23.
Neilson Barnard Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 4:22 pm

Many motorcycle riders covet the distinctive growl of a Harley-Davidson — and sometimes even add extra-loud exhaust pipes to amp up the sound.

But the motorcycle maker has now rolled out a prototype bike that makes more of a whisper than a rumble. It's a sporty-looking model called LiveWire, and it's powered by batteries.

Harley-Davidson plans to take its prototype electric motorcycle to more than 30 cities over the next few months. Sometime after that, the company will decide whether to put LiveWire on the market.

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Sports
2:59 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

No Reason To Quit: Driver John Force Still Racing Full Throttle

John Force launches from the starting line at the 2012 O'Reilly Auto Parts Route 66 National Hot Rod Association Nationals in Joliet, Ill.
Teresa Long AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 12:33 pm

The National Hot Rod Association puts on one loud and fast show. Funny Cars dragsters accelerate to over 300 miles per hour on a straight, quarter-mile track. Each race lasts just 4 seconds.

If you've ever wondered what it's like to fire up the engine of a 10,000 horsepower Funny Car, just ask driver John Force.

"It'll blow your ear sockets out," Force says. "When you hit that throttle, you think an H-bomb just went off. The motor just roars. ... It can shake you so hard, it can knock you out."

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Dallas County Agrees To Take In About 1,000 Immigrant Children

A child deported from the United State poses for photo in front of a map of Guatemala City at an immigration shelter in Guatemala City on June 19.
Luis Soto AP

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 3:34 pm

Calling the situation a "humanitarian crisis," County Judge Clay Jenkins said Dallas County is prepared to house more than 1,000 immigrant children.

"I believe that every child is precious, and that regardless of your stance on immigration or the causes for this human tragedy, we cannot turn our back on the children that are already here," Jenkins said while speaking at the Texas Democratic Convention on Saturday.

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Environment
9:59 am
Sat June 28, 2014

As Yosemite Park Turns 150, Charms And Challenges Endure

Over the past century and a half, visitors have traveled through Yosemite on foot, by carriage, by tram and by car. Now some regions will be once again be accessible only by foot, to protect delicate regions of the park.
Courtesy Yosemite National Park Research Library/KQED

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

Yosemite National Park, in California's Sierra Nevada, is celebrating the 150th anniversary of the law that preserved it — and planted the seeds for the National Park system. At the same time, the park faces the challenge of protecting the natural wonders from their own popularity.

Since President Abraham Lincoln signed the 1864 law that protected this land, visitors have been enjoying the park's spectacular features, from Half Dome to the giant sequoia grove — and the moonbow at Yosemite Falls.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Following High Court Decision, Aereo Suspends Operations

Aereo, a Web service that provides television shows online, lost a Supreme Court case Wednesday, as the justices ruled it violates copyright law.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 9:47 am

Aereo, the company that lets subscribers watch TV stations' video that it routes onto the Internet, has decided to suspend its operation.

The decision comes a few days after the Supreme Court handed the company a major loss by ruling that, like cable companies, it was performing the work of television networks publicly.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Suspect In Benghazi Attacks Now On U.S. Soil, Pleads Not Guilty

This undated image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 2:19 pm

(This post was last updated at 3:55 p.m. ET.)

Ahmed Abu Khattala, the Libyan man the United States says played a key role on the attacks on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, is now on American soil.

In a short appearance at the federal court house in Washington, D.C., Khattala pleaded not guilty to a single count of conspiring to provide material support and resources to terrorists.

NPR's Carrie Johnson is at the court house and reports:

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Report Blames 'Corrosive Culture' For Problems In VA System

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 9:29 am

A White House investigation into the problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals across the country found that "there are significant and chronic systematic failures" that need to be addressed.

NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit that the report was delivered to President Obama on Friday. Scott filed this report:

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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Golden Gate Bridge Board Approves Funding For Suicide Barrier

A view of the north tower of the Golden Gate Bridge.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 9:32 am

The Golden Gate Bridge's board of directors approved $76 million in funding to install a net system that would prevent people from committing suicide by jumping off the bridge.

The Associated Press reports the money will come from a combination of bridge tolls and federal and state coffers. The wire service adds:

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Tackling Sexual Assault On Campus With Comedy

"Clearly universities are not making their campuses safe for women," Comedy Central's Jon Stewart noted in a recent segment focusing on rape and sexual assault on campus.
Comedy Central

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 8:26 am

There's nothing funny about sexual assault. But the absurdity of how some colleges respond to it can make you laugh.

This week, Comedy Central's Jon Stewart became the latest comedian to crack wise about the rape crisis on America's college campuses: Reports are up, yet many schools still fail to adequately address the problem.

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Around the Nation
6:02 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Golden Gate Bridge To Get Suicide Net

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And this week, the board that runs another American landmark, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, approved a plan to put suicide nets alongside the span. The nets will be 20 feet wide on each side and be made of stainless steel mesh. There were 46 suicides off the bridge last year, the highest number since it's opened in 1937.

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Law
6:02 am
Sat June 28, 2014

New York's Attorney Hears A Backlash From India

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 10:43 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:08 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Older Moms Take Heart: You May Be More Likely To Live Longer

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 2:58 pm

Americans are waiting longer to become parents. Whatever the pros and cons of that trend, here's some potentially good news for those older moms: They may be more likely to live longer.

Women who had their last child after the age of 33 had twice the odds of "exceptional longevity" — defined as living to about 95 — as did women who had their last child before age 29, according to a study published this week in the journal Menopause.

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Court Stays Decision Striking Down Indiana's Gay Marriage Ban

A federal appeals court has granted a stay on a lower court ruling striking down Indiana's same-sex marriage ban ahead of a planned appeal.

Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller was granted a stay by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, which will hear an appeal of a ruling Wednesday of the U.S. District Court. Wednesday's decision found the ban unconstitutional.

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This Week's Must Read
4:33 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

SCOTUS On Cellphones And The Privacy Of Poetry

Dear sweet privacy, where did you go? And where can we go to be alone with you again? Thanks to the Supreme Court, one answer is, surprisingly, our cell phones. On Wednesday, the Court ruled that, except in emergencies such as kidnappings and bomb threats, police can't search our phones without a warrant.

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It's All Politics
3:22 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

What's The Matter With Wendy Davis?

Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis pauses as she speaks to supporters at her campaign headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, in March.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:39 pm

Texas Democrats are holding their convention this weekend in Dallas. Supporters are hoping it will give Wendy Davis a chance to reboot her campaign for governor and come out with some much-needed momentum.

A question posed in the San Antonio Express-News is typical of the kind of media she's been getting: "What's Wrong With Wendy?" With the Democratic candidate for governor running far behind her Republican challenger, Greg Abbott, it's not necessarily an unfair question.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

In Iraq, Coordination With Iran Not Impossible, Gen. Dempsey Says

Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon in December.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

In an interview with All Things Considered, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declined to rule out coordination with Iran and Iranian-backed forces in Iraq. Dempsey also told NPR that one option in Iraq might involve U.S. air assets going after "high-value" individuals within the main Sunni insurgent group.

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Religion
3:22 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Podcaster Risks Excommunication For Defending Gay Mormons

Spires from the Mormon temple in downtown Salt Lake City reach to the sky.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are cracking down on members who openly dispute the doctrine of the faith. Earlier this week, a Mormon feminist was excommunicated for pursing membership in the all-male priesthood of the church. Now another member, John Dehlin, is facing the same fate — for questioning scripture and speaking out on behalf of gay Mormons.

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Latin America
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Bitter Debt Fight Between Argentina And U.S. Set To Reach Climax

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. For most of the last 14 years, Argentina has been locked in a bitter fight over how much has to pay its international creditors. On Monday, that battle will come to a head. That's the deadline the U.S. Supreme Court set for Argentina to pay off some U.S. hedge funds that had bought its bonds. Argentina says the payments could ruin the country. NPR's Jim Zarroli explains.

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Politics
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Obama Gets Real, Meeting The Authors Behind White House Letters

President Obama sits down to have lunch with Rebekah Erler at Matt's Bar in Minneapolis on Thursday. Obama spent a day with Erler, who wrote the White House about her struggles to make ends meet.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:34 pm

When President Obama delivered a speech about the economy in Minneapolis on Friday, a woman named Rebekah Erler sat in the audience with her family.

The White House billed the president's two-day trip to Minnesota as at least in part a "day in the life of Rebekah" — and it's a throwback, in a sense, to a time before Barack Obama was a household name.

In 2007, when his candidacy was still considered a long shot, then-Sen. Obama spent a day walking in the shoes of a home health aide.

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Men In America
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Memphis Preteen Works To Put The 'Bazam' Back In The Bow Tie

12-year-old Moziah Bridges started his bowtie company, Mo's Bows, three years ago in Memphis. He says dressing well "helps people respect you and it makes you look good."
Annabella Charles Courtesy of Mo's Bows

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 4:33 pm

12-year-old Moziah Bridges is a bow tie aficionado and the CEO of his own company, Mo's Bows.

"I wanted to have that look — that 'bazam' look," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish.

Bridges says dressing well is a big part of growing up to be a man.

Listen to the audio above to hear the full conversation.

Men In America
2:30 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Bathrobes And Baby Carriers: The Stuff Of Manliness?

David Lee writes an online men's guide to Asian lifestyle and entertainment. He says he voted against a battle-ax and for his bathrobe when choosing a masculine object. The blue terry cloth robe is based on the Adventure Time cartoon.
Courtesy of Salima Koroma

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 10:30 am

This summer, All Things Considered is looking at the lives of Men in America and how things have changed — or haven't. Part of that is redefining masculinity, so the show asked me to ask guys about the stuff they equate with manliness today. (Submit your own stories in the form below.)

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Code Switch
2:23 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Wave Of Guatemalan Migrant Children Presents Unique Challenges

Two young girls watch a World Cup soccer match on a television at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 7:46 am

President Obama issued a warning this week to any parents in Mexico and Central America considering allowing their children to cross the U.S. border alone.

"Do not send your children to the borders," he told ABC News. "If they do make it, they'll get sent back. More importantly, they may not make it."

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