U.S. News

Around the Nation
2:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Students Say University Of Mary Washington Failed To Address Yik Yak Threats

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 4:07 pm

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Animals
2:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

At Long Last, Taxidermied Hyenas In Chicago Get Their Own Diorama

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 5:13 pm

After years tucked away in the Reptile Hall at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, four striped taxidermied hyenas are finally getting their own diorama.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
2:30 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

California Prepares For Difficult Fire Season Amid Drought

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 4:22 pm

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Shots - Health News
6:34 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Fla. Governor Leaves Meeting With U.S. Health Secretary Empty-Handed

Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks Wednesday with reporters in Washington, D.C., after a meeting with Sylvia Burwell, head of the Department of Health and Human Services.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 6:48 am

Florida Gov. Rick Scott paid a high-stakes visit to Washington D.C. on Wednesday, in hopes of persuading the Obama administration to continue a program that sends more than $1 billion in federal funds to Florida each year to help reimburse hospitals for the costs of caring for the state's poor. Uncertainty about the future of the program, slated to end June 30, has created a hole in the state budget and paralyzed Florida's legislature.

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Religion
5:55 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Boston Archdiocese, Catholic Parishioners Battle Over Church Eviction

Jon Rogers is hugged by his wife, Maryellen, following services at St. Frances Xavier Cabrini Church in Scituate, Mass., in June 2014.
Jessica Rinaldi Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 2:04 pm

When walking into the front vestibule of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini Church in the seaside town of Scituate, Mass., it doesn't look or sound like the average church.

"What the hell are you doing?" an actor from The Young and the Restless says on a big-screen TV with two recliners set up in front of it. They're all arranged right next to a stained-glass window.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

3 Arrested In California For Operating 3,000-Year-Old Masonic Police Department

A screen grab from the group's website.
NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 6:04 pm

It was a plot to rival Foucault's Pendulum: Police in Los Angeles arrested three people in connection with operating a fictitious police department they said was 3,000 years old and had jurisdiction over 33 states and Mexico.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Illinois Assembly's Rare Hearing Challenges Proposed Workers' Comp Cutbacks

John Coffell sits at his grandmother's table in Hulen, Okla. An injury at a tire plant last year left him unable to work.
Brett Deering for ProPublica/AP

Originally published on Mon May 11, 2015 8:33 am

Democratic lawmakers in Illinois sought to turn back proposed cutbacks in workers' compensation benefits with a rare eight-hour hearing Tuesday before the entire Illinois House.

House Democratic Speaker Michael Madigan convened the hearing in response to workers' compensation changes proposed by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner.

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It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Remembering A Former House Speaker Whose Fall Signaled New Era Of Polarization

Former House Speaker Jim Wright of Texas in 2005. He died Wednesday at the age of 92.
Yuri Gripas AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:14 pm

Jim Wright occupies a kind of shadow territory in Washington memory. He rose to be speaker of the House, arguably the second most powerful job in the country. For a season he challenged the authority of the president on foreign policy. A master of the internal politics and practices of the House, Wright once seemed likely to rule that world for as long as the Democrats held the majority — which he and they and most everyone else expected to last forever.

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Sports
3:09 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

'More Probable Than Not' That Patriots Deflated Footballs, NFL Report Says

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:55 pm

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Shots - Health News
3:06 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea.
R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:55 pm

Scientists have discovered a group of microbes at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean that could provide new clues to how life went from being simple to complex.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

California Races To Protect Its Forests As Fire Season Begins

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:55 pm

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Law
3:06 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Asks Justice Department To Investigate Police Department

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
3:06 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

I'm 'The Chief Worrying Officer': Ted Leonsis On Running Washington Sports

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 5:55 pm

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Shots - Health News
3:06 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Staffing An Intensive Care Unit From Miles Away Has Advantages

Registered nurses Cassie Gregor (from left), Camellia Douglas and Mike Montalto monitor patients in intensive care units scattered around North Carolina.
Kevin McCarthy/Carolinas HealthCare System

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 9:56 am

Recovering from pneumonia is an unusual experience in the 10-bed intensive care unit at the Carolinas HealthCare System hospital in rural Lincolnton, N.C.

The small hospital has its regular staff, but Richard Gilbert, one of the ICU patients, has an extra nurse who is 45 miles away. That nurse, Cassie Gregor, sits in front of six computer screens in an office building. She wears a headset and comes into Gilbert's room via a computer screen.

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Remembrances
2:19 pm
Wed May 6, 2015

Jericho Scott, Promising Young Pitcher, Killed In Drive-By Shooting

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 4:22 pm

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NPR History Dept.
9:25 am
Wed May 6, 2015

4 Hot-Button Kids' Books From The '50s That Sparked Controversy

NPR

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 5:58 am

The 1950s was a hinge decade for noteworthy and nation-changing civil rights events across the United States, including Brown v. Board of Education in Kansas, the bus boycott in Alabama and the National Guard-protected integration of Central High School in Arkansas.

Meanwhile, there was also a revolution brewing in bookstores and public libraries.

By design or by happenstance, a handful of children's picture books were focal points of the American movement toward integration in the '50s.

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Around the Nation
6:37 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Texas Governor Backtracks After Pentagon Denies Takeover Plot

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 12:12 pm

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The Two-Way
4:04 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Chicago Creates Reparations Fund For Victims Of Police Torture

Stanley Wrice pauses in December 2013 as he speaks to the media with his lawyer, Heidi Linn Lambros (left), and his daughter, Gail Lewis, while leaving Pontiac Correctional Center in Pontiac, Ill. Wrice was released after serving more than 30 years. He claimed for decades that Chicago police detectives under the command of then-Lt. Jon Burge beat and coerced him into confessing to rape.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 11:43 am

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET.

The city of Chicago has become the first in the nation to create a reparations fund for victims of police torture, after the City Council unanimously approved the $5.5 million package.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the abuse and torture of scores of mostly black, male suspects in the 1970s, '80s and early '90s by former police Cmdr. Jon Burge and his detectives is a "stain that cannot be removed from our city's history."

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:47 am
Wed May 6, 2015

6 Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

Jamaal Allan is a teacher in Des Moines, Iowa. His name has taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.
Courtesy of Jamaal Allan

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 12:09 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, in which thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

People make a lot of assumptions based on a name alone.

Jamaal Allan, a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa, should know. To the surprise of many who have only seen his name, Allan is white. And that's taken him on a lifelong odyssey of racial encounters.

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NPR Ed
3:37 am
Wed May 6, 2015

What Happens In Vegas Includes Crowded, Struggling Schools

Students eat lunch at Robert Forbuss Elementary School in Las Vegas. The school, designed for 780 students, enrolls 1,230.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 7:54 am

Las Vegas is back, baby. After getting slammed by the Great Recession, the city today is seeing rising home sales, solid job growth and a record number of visitors in 2014.stru

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Sweetness And Light
3:03 am
Wed May 6, 2015

Athletes Want To Talk To Fans Without Meddlesome Sports Journalists

Derek Jeter attends the launch party for his new website, The Players' Tribune, on Feb. 14 in New York City. The site is a platform for athletes to talk directly to fans.
Timothy Hiatt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 8:25 am

It's interesting to note the major differences in the way the media deals with sports stars and entertainment celebrities in public.

When entertainment personalities are interviewed, they are dressed to the nines, and the interrogation consists mostly of compliments. Athletes, however, are interviewed all grubby and sweaty, and primarily, they are rudely asked to explain themselves. Why did you strike out? How could you have possibly dropped that pass?

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Pacquiao Sued For Failing To Disclose Injury Before 'Fight Of The Century'

Manny Pacquiao answers questions May 2 during a news conference following his welterweight title fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. in Las Vegas. Pacquiao could face disciplinary action from Nevada boxing officials for failing to disclose a shoulder injury before the fight.
John Locher AP

Boxer Manny Pacquiao is being sued for his failure to disclose a shoulder injury during his "Fight of the Century" Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

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The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Justice Dept. Criticizes Punishments For Agents Linked To Student's Detention

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 4:54 pm

Federal agents who forgot that a detained San Diego college student was in a jail cell and left him without food or water for more than four days were reprimanded and suspended for up to seven days, a punishment the Justice Department says is inadequate.

The case involves Daniel Chong's detention in 2012 by agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration.

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It's All Politics
3:30 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Clinton 'War Room' Pushback And The 'Invent Your Own' Media Campaign

The Clinton campaign is embracing several new technologies and platforms to get its message out more directly to voters, a tactic her potential rivals are sure to employ, too.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 7:33 pm

The Hillary Clinton campaign went into overdrive Tuesday trying to minimize the damage from a new book that delves into Clinton foundation fundraising — and it's not using the typical channels to do so.

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National Security
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Self-Declared Islamic State Claims Responsibility For Texas Shooting

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:55 pm

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It's All Politics
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

New Jersey Pension Lawsuit Piles On Gov. Christie's Rough Week

New Jersey's pension system is more than $80 billion in the red. Gov. Christie mostly blames past governors for sticking him with this bill. "I'm like the guy who showed up for dinner at dessert. ... And I got the check," he said earlier this year.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

It's been a tough week for New Jersey Gov. and possible Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie.

One of his former allies pleaded guilty and two others were indicted for allegedly creating a traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge as political retribution.

Now, New Jersey's highest court is set to hear arguments over one of Christie's signature accomplishments: his pension reform deal.

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Religion
3:11 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Texas Shooting Sheds Light On Murkiness Between Free, Hate Speech

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

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Code Switch
2:52 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

Ladies In The Streets: Before Stonewall, Transgender Uprising Changed Lives

A view of Gene Compton's cafeteria In San Francisco's Tenderloin District. In 1966, the eatery was the site of landmark confrontations between police and transgender activists.
Courtesy of Screaming Queens/Frameline

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 8:28 am

It was after the bars had closed and well into the pre-dawn hours of an August morning in 1966 when San Francisco cops were in Gene Compton's cafeteria again. They were arresting drag queens, trans women and gay hustlers who had been sitting for hours, eating and gossiping and coming down from their highs with the help of 60-cent cups of coffee.

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U.S.
2:29 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

From Oakland To Baltimore, Lessons Learned From Cities Of Unrest

Public memorials, like the one at the scene where Freddie Gray was arrested, have become sites to commemorate other deaths of unarmed black men in similar police encounters across the country.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed May 6, 2015 4:07 pm

The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men.

Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward.

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Sports
2:29 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

St. Louis Rams Consider Move To Los Angeles

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 5:32 pm

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