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Code Switch On Dallas, Philando Castile And Alton Sterling

Jul 8, 2016

Code Switch is covering the deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile and several police officers in Dallas. Here's where to find us, and how to contribute to our reporting.

We'll be following this story closely on social media; you can find us on Twitter at @NPRCodeSwitch.

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Gene and Carolyn Shoemaker made a life together gazing at the stars. For 17 years, the couple worked side by side — Gene, as a renowned astrogeologist, studying planets and other celestial bodies, and Carolyn, who had turned to astronomy later in life yet discovered more comets than most pros.

"When I was 50 years old and my kids were grown, Gene suggested, well, maybe I would like to try my hand at astronomy a little bit," Carolyn tells her son-in-law Phred Salazar, on a recent visit with StoryCorps.

It may seem like there are a lot more cases of people being shot and killed by police.

Just this week, two African-American men were shot by police: Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn. Before that there was Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., Laquan McDonald in Chicago and Tamir Rice in Cleveland.

But could it be that we are just paying more attention?

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Editor's note: This is an excerpt from the latest episode of the Invisibilia podcast and program, which is broadcast on participating public radio stations.

Until she was 54 years old, Kim was totally unaware that there were things in the world she couldn't see.

"This was the whole problem," Kim says. "I had no clue what the problem was."

This is a developing story. Last updated 6:18 a.m. ET.

Snipers shot and killed five Dallas law enforcement officers and injured another six at the end of a rally in downtown Dallas, where hundreds were protesting police shootings that happened in other parts of the country earlier this week.

Four of the officers worked for Dallas Police; the fifth was identified as 43-year-old transit officer Brent Thompson, of Dallas Area Rapid Transit, or DART.

Baton Rouge, La., gathered for the third night in a row to remember Alton Sterling.

Sterling was shot by police on Tuesday; video posted that night showed he was lying on the ground when police pulled their weapons. The local community quickly took to the streets in protest.

On Wednesday, as the story gained national traction, a second photo was posted online, showing the shooting from closer range. On Wednesday night, The Associated Press reports, people gathered in prayer and anger to remember Sterling and protest his death.

Seconds after a policeman shot a man named Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minn., his girlfriend started live-streaming the aftermath live on Facebook.

On Tuesday, Alton Sterling, a black man, was shot and killed by police outside a convenience store in Baton Rouge, La. The Department of Justice is investigating his death, which was captured on video.

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Want Kids To Eat More Veggies? Market Them With Cartoons

Jul 7, 2016

Be it SpongeBob SquarePants or Tony the Tiger, food companies have long used cartoon characters to market their products to children. But that tactic can also sway younger kids to eat fresh vegetables, according to a new study.

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