U.S. News

Law
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Lawyers Try To Fight Death Penalty With New PTSD Understanding

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

NYPD Union Leader: Apology From De Blasio Would Go A Long Way

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:37 pm

Patrick Lynch, the head of the big New York City Police Department union, the Patrolman's Benevolent Association, has been a outspoken critic of Mayor Bill de Blasio, saying there was "blood on the hands" of the mayor in the death of two police officers. Robert Siegel talks with Lynch about the tension between the police and the mayor.

Sports
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Baseball Hall Of Fame Elects Three Pitchers, Second Baseman

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 4:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Remembrances
2:54 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Bess Myerson Was An Author, TV Personality, Civil Servant

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 4:39 pm

Bess Myerson was crowned Miss America in 1945 and was the only Jewish-American woman to ever hold the title. She went on to have a long career in public affairs, though it was sometimes marked by scandal. She died Dec. 14 at the age of 90.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
1:10 pm
Tue January 6, 2015

Tight Control Of Type 1 Diabetes Saves Lives, But It's Tough

Even with the best available technology, keeping blood sugar under control requires constant vigilance.
Mark Hatfield iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 6:06 am

Here's more evidence that for people with Type 1 diabetes, strict blood sugar control matters – in this case, it actually reduces the risk of early death. But another study reveals the grim reality: Those with the condition still die about a decade sooner than those without.

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Shots - Health News
11:50 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Bariatric Surgery Cuts The Risk Of Death Years Later

A lap band displayed on a model of a human stomach. It creates a small pouch at the top of the stomach that makes people feel full more quickly.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 11:23 am

Bariatric surgery is being widely promoted as the solution for people who are extremely obese, but so far most of the studies haven't followed enough people for enough time to really know if surgery helps improve health long term.

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Secret Lives Of Teachers
11:33 am
Tue January 6, 2015

In Class It's 'Ms. Smalls,' Onstage She's 'Miss Houston'

Smalls shown competing in the Miss Texas pageant.
Courtesy of BluDoor Studios

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Artist? Carpenter? Quidditch player? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

It wasn't until Isis Smalls arrived on campus wearing a rhinestone-encrusted tiara and a sash emblazoned with "Miss Houston" that her students discovered she was a newly crowned, bona fide beauty queen.

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Weather: Flooding Out West, Intense Cold To The East

A map showing low temperatures across the U.S.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:58 am

There are two big weather patterns making news this week: In the Pacific Northwest, heavy rains have led to landslides, flooding and evacuations.

The Seattle Times reports from Western Washington:

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Tue January 6, 2015

What Schools Could Use Instead Of Standardized Tests

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 2:26 pm

Close your eyes for a minute and daydream about a world without bubble tests.

Education Week recently reported that some Republican Senate aides are doing more than dreaming — they're drafting a bill that would eliminate the federal mandate on standardized testing.

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The Two-Way
4:45 am
Tue January 6, 2015

2 NYPD Officers Shot While Investigating Robbery

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 12:00 pm

Two New York Police Department plain-clothes officers were shot while they investigated a robbery call in the Bronx.

NY1 reports:

"Police say the two officers were part of a five-member plain clothes anti-crime team responding to a call of an armed robbery of a grocery store on East 180th Street.

"The officers were all traveling in a car when they saw one suspect enter a Chinese restaurant on East 184th Street and Tiebout Avenue.

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Around the Nation
3:00 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Same-Sex Marriages Conducted In Florida After Ban Is Lifted

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 8:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Code Switch
1:57 am
Tue January 6, 2015

For Many Navajo, A Visit From The 'Water Lady' Is A Refreshing Sight

Darlene Arviso is known as the water lady in Smith Lake, N.M., on the Navajo Nation. She delivers water to 250 people each month. Here, she fills buckets from her water truck.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 7:37 am

The people who live in the northwest corner of New Mexico consider Darlene Arviso to be a living saint.

"Everybody knows me around here. They'll be waving at me," she says from behind the wheel of the St. Bonaventure Indian Mission water truck. "They call me the water lady."

That's because Arviso hauls water for tribe members of the Navajo Nation, where, on average, residents use 7 gallons a day to drink, cook, bathe and clean. The average person in the U.S. uses about 100 gallons a day.

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Shots - Health News
1:54 am
Tue January 6, 2015

Addiction Patients Overwhelm Vermont's Expanded Treatment Programs

Publicity from Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin's State of the State address last January drove up demand for addiction treatment in the state.
Andy Duback AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 9:11 am

Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin attracted national attention last January when he devoted his entire State of the State address to Vermont's opiate addiction problem.

For the first time, he said, the number of people seeking drug addiction treatment had surpassed those getting help for alcoholism, and many had nowhere to go.

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The Salt
1:52 am
Tue January 6, 2015

How Anglers Are Learning To Save Fish That Get 'The Bends'

Barotrauma can cause a fish's eyes to pop out of its head and its stomach to be pushed out of its mouth, according to Chris Lowe, a marine scientist at California State, Long Beach.
Jon Hamilton NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 9:35 am

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The Two-Way
7:56 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

LA, DC, SF, Boston? U.S. Pick For Olympic Host May Come Thursday

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 9:09 am

Officials in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston and Washington have been awaiting a decision from the U.S. Olympic Committee on which of the four will be the American entry to host the 2024 Summer Olympics. Their wait may come to an end this week.

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The Two-Way
5:43 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Student Tuition Now Outweighs State Funding At Public Colleges

During the fiscal years 2003-2012, "median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges," while state funding decreased by 12 percent, the General Accountability Office reports.
Imeh Akpanudosen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 5:45 pm

Driven by higher tuition fees and tighter state funds, America's public colleges now get more money from their students than from all state sources. That's according to a report by the Government Accountability Office, which says tuition revenue reached 25 percent of the colleges' total in 2012.

The numbers are stark, with the GAO saying that from fiscal years 2003-2012, "state funding decreased by 12 percent overall while median tuition rose 55 percent across all public colleges."

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All Tech Considered
4:37 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 9:00 am

This year, there will be an important change in the way Americans use their credit cards. More banks will be issuing cards with small computer chips, a move they say will protect against credit card fraud.

But banks are stopping short of another step that will make credit card usage even safer. And a lot of retailers aren't too happy about it.

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All Tech Considered
3:49 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job.
Daniel Acker Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:30 am

Prosecutors say tools that cloak online identities are complicating their efforts to police all kinds of crime.

Take the case of a former head of cybersecurity for the Department of Health and Human Services, Timothy DeFoggi. Prosecutors say they found graphic images of children on a laptop computer in his home.

DeFoggi once led cybersecurity efforts for HHS, but in this case, the Justice Department says, he used his expertise to hide from the law, along with other users of child porn sites, on a network called Tor.

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Business
3:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Low Gas Prices Give SUV Sales A Boost, But Automakers Take Long View

Dodge Ram pickup trucks await customers Jan. 5 on the lot at Landmark Dodge Chrysler Jeep in Morrow, Ga. Buoyed by a resurgent economy, holiday sales, cheap gasoline and a love affair with pickup trucks, Americans headed to car dealers in droves last month, pushing full-year sales to what's likely to be the highest level since 2006.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 6:07 am

Sales of cars surged in December, and analysts believe that the year's total will exceed 17 million, making it the fifth straight year of growth for the industry.

Cheap gas prices helped make that happen, as sales of trucks, SUVs and luxury vehicles rose rapidly. Jeep's sales, for instance, were up 40 percent on increased consumer demand for crossover SUVs. Meanwhile, demand for hybrid and alternative-fuel vehicles shrank.

Scott Painter, founder and CEO of auto sales website TrueCar, says those trends aren't necessarily good for the industry as a whole.

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Law
3:17 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Same-Sex Marriages Start In Florida

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today, Florida became the 36th state to legalize gay marriage after an extended legal battle in state and federal courts. NPR's Greg Allen was at the courthouse in Miami for today's ruling.

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Law
2:47 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Tsarnaev Defense Attorney Has Long History With High-Profile Cases

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 9:05 pm

The trial began Monday for the surviving suspect in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. Melissa Block talks to criminal lawyer Jonathan Shapiro about Judy Clarke, one of the defense attorneys representing Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Clarke has represented other high profile defendants, including Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph and Tucson gunman Jared Lee Loughner.

NPR Ed
2:46 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

From Foster Care To Freshman Year

When Jasmine Uqdah aged out of the foster care system in 2008, she didn't have a job, a checking account or a car. She did have a college acceptance letter — but no money to pay for schooling.
Joshua Lott for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 7:39 am

By the time she aged out of foster care, Jasmine Uqdah had spent nearly half her life in the system. On a summer day in 2008, Uqdah grabbed her duffel bag and two small garbage bags, and she stuffed everything she owned inside.

It wasn't much — just some clothes and a few stuffed animals. She said her goodbyes to her foster family in Detroit and moved out. She was 18 years old.

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Law
2:30 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

Potential Jurors Screened For Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
2:23 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

6 Reasons Size Matters To The New GOP Majorities In Congress

The 114th Congress opens Tuesday, swearing in the most House Republicans since 1947. But how much does the numbers game really matter now?
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue January 6, 2015 11:12 am

The 114th Congress opens Tuesday with 246 Republicans taking the oath of office in the House. That's the most the GOP has sworn in since 1947, when the same number arrived for the 80th Congress intent on challenging Democratic President Harry Truman.

For a time, it had appeared that the new 114th majority would eclipse that of the 80th by one. But then Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., pleaded guilty to tax evasion charges and, after a sit-down with Speaker John Boehner a week ago, agreed to resign.

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Around the Nation
2:23 pm
Mon January 5, 2015

De Blasio And NYPD Commisioner Tout Lower Crime, Amid Tensions

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shots - Health News
9:53 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Sleeping Near A Smartphone Can Disturb A Child's Rest

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 2:17 pm

The last thing my 11-year-old does before she goes to sleep is put her iPod on the nightstand. And that could mean less sleep for her, researchers say.

There's plenty of evidence that children who have televisions in their rooms get less sleep. This is one of the first studies to look at whether having a small screen like an iPod or smartphone in the room also affects rest.

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The Two-Way
4:38 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Oh, It's Winter: Huge Swath Of U.S. Will Be Bitterly Cold

A map showing the forecast low temperatures.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 6:25 am

Winter has arrived in the United States: Over the next day or so, the jet stream will dip and bring some bone-chilling temperatures to a huge swath of the country.

Meteorologists at the Weather Channel say the winter storm will "bring a swath of snow more than 2,000 miles long from the Cascades and Northern Rockies across the Midwest and into the Northeast through Tuesday."

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Around the Nation
3:02 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Funeral For Slain Officer Blended NYPD And Chinese Traditions

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 7:41 am

Copyright 2015 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wnyc.org/.

Law
1:35 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Jury Selection To Begin Monday In Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 11:23 am

The search begins Monday for the jurors who will decide the fate of the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. It was the deadliest act of terrorism in the U.S. since the Sept. 11 attacks, and the trial is one that many have been waiting for.

A couple of dozen survivors are expected in court for at least part of the trial — including Heather Abbott, who lost a leg in the attack. She's hoping for answers to both why and how the bombing was carried out.

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Shots - Health News
1:33 am
Mon January 5, 2015

What Heroin Addiction Tells Us About Changing Bad Habits

U.S. soldiers at Long Binh base in South Vietnam line up to give urine samples at a heroin detection center before departing for the United States. About 20 percent of soldiers said they were addicts, but most didn't continue drug use back home.
AP

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 2:15 pm

It's a tradition as old as New Year's: making resolutions. We will not smoke, or sojourn with the bucket of mint chocolate chip. In fact, we will resist sweets generally, including the bowl of M&M's that our co-worker has helpfully positioned on the aisle corner of his desk. There will be exercise, and the learning of a new language.

It is resolved.

So what does science know about translating our resolve into actual changes in behavior? The answer to this question brings us — strangely enough — to a story about heroin use in Vietnam.

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