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A nanny convicted in New York in the stabbing deaths of two small children in her charge in 2012 has been sentenced to life without parole.

Yoselyn Ortega, 55, wept as she addressed the courtroom upon her sentencing for the deaths of the Krim children, 2-year-old Leo and 6-year-old Lucian, also known as Lulu.

"I'm very sorry for everything that happened, but I hope that no one goes through what I have gone through," Ortega told the court in Spanish.

"I ask for forgiveness from God, from Marina, from Kevin," she said referring to the parents.

The Trump administration announced Monday that it has dramatically increased the number of worksite investigations and audits to make sure that American businesses do not employ people who are in the U.S. illegally.

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

The trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was halted Monday, the third day of jury selection, but officials said they will refile the felony invasion of privacy case using a special prosecutor.

Pedestrian deaths in 2016 were the highest they've been since 1990. And SUVs were responsible for a growing number of those fatalities.

A new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety found that between 2009 and 2016, pedestrian fatalities increased in nearly every circumstance examined. But among all types of vehicles, SUVs had the biggest spike in single-vehicle fatal pedestrian crashes, and crashes were increasingly likely to involve high-horsepower vehicles.

James Harrison, an Australian man whose blood contains a rare antibody that can create a treatment that saves babies' lives, has donated plasma one last time.

Harrison, 81, is now over the age limit for donors — in fact, he hit the cap months ago.

But the Australian Red Cross Blood Service let him donate one last time on Friday. The service estimates that over the course of his life, he has helped save some 2.4 million babies.

It has been 10 weeks since Italian voters handed the country's populist parties big gains at the ballot box — but if the general election's big winners, the anti-establishment 5-Star Movement and the far-right, anti-immigrant League party, are to form a governing coalition, it appears they will need at least a few days more.

Updated 3:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Florida has decided that the National Rifle Association cannot use pseudonyms for teenagers who want to buy guns as part of a legal challenge against new gun laws in Florida.

The judge expressed sympathy for the teenagers, acknowledging that they probably would suffer extreme harassment if their names were public. But, he wrote with evident reluctance, the law was clear that pseudonyms were not allowed.

It was roughly 43 years ago that Xia Boyu made his first attempt to scale Mount Everest. The Chinese climber had been in his mid-20s, serving in an expedition that came close to the peak before it unraveled under the force of high-altitude storms.

Xia lost his feet to frostbite during that ill-fated effort. Two decades later, he would also lose both legs beneath the knee to lymphoma. But all the while, the double amputee held onto his dream of returning to — and conquering — Everest.

Margot Kidder, who became famous for playing Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in Superman, has died at her home in Montana. Kidder was 69; her acting career spanned decades, from TV series in the late 1960s to seven films in the past five years.

A cause of death has not yet been publicly released for Kidder. Her death was announced by the Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Mont., where she resided.

"The actress and activist passed away on Sun., May 13, 2018 at her home," the funeral home said.

A Southwest jetliner was hit with a "pressurization issue in flight," the airline says, resulting in oxygen masks dropping and a warning to ground personnel to have paramedics ready when the plane landed at Dallas Love Field on Saturday night. Four of the 120 passengers said they had ear pain as a result.

Flight 861 was on its way from Denver to Dallas when the crew radioed ahead to ask for help to be waiting for the Boeing 737.

Updated 2:06 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Supreme Court threw open the door to legalized sports betting on Monday. By a 6-3 vote, the court struck down a 1992 federal law that effectively prevented most states from legalizing sports betting.

"Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each State is free to act on its own," the court wrote.

Updated 2:55 p.m. ET

The United States is now the first country with an embassy to Israel located in Jerusalem, the disputed city claimed as a capital by both Israeli and Palestinian people.

The new embassy was dedicated on Monday in a ceremony attended by Israeli leaders and senior White House advisers.

President Trump's decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital has removed the Palestinians' "right of veto" on the move and allowed the parties to focus on more important issues, the U.S. ambassador to Israel tells NPR.

David Friedman, in an interview with Morning Edition, says he believes, as does the president, that such a veto was for the Palestinians "an inappropriate card to play."

"I think the move is going to permit the parties to focus on the issues that are first of all important and second of all solvable," Friedman tells host Steve Inskeep.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of Palestinians are protesting the opening of the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, and Israeli army forces have killed 55 protesters, according to the Gaza Health Ministry. The ministry also says some 2,770 people have been hurt in demonstrations and clashes.

Updated at 3:40 a.m. ET

Authorities in Indonesia say that a family of five riding two explosives-laden motorbikes carried out a suicide attack on police headquarters in Surabaya on Monday, wounding at least 10 people after a similar attack on three separate churches over the weekend killed more than a dozen people.

According to the BBC, video of the attack in Indonesia's second-largest city "shows two motorbikes approaching a checkpoint just before the blast."

New fissures have opened on Hawaii's Big Island as earthquakes continue to rock the island, and scientists are warning about further volcanic eruptions.

Officials announced the island's 17th fissure on Saturday evening, hours after a 16th fissure emerged, releasing lava that traveled 250 yards before settling. That fissure opened near the Puna Geothermal Venture plant, where officials have removed 60,000 gallons of flammable liquid as a precaution.

A shallow earthquake, with a magnitude of 3.5, also hit the island on Saturday.

Twenty-six people were killed and seven wounded in a village in rural Burundi late Friday, according to Burundi's security minister.

Security Minister Alain Guillaume Bunyoni said a "terrorist group" was responsible but he did not name the group, according to The Associated Press. The attack took place in the village of Ruhagarika in Cibitoke province, located in the northwest of the small East African country.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Suicide bombers killed at least 13 people and wounded dozens in attacks on three different churches holding services in Indonesia's second-largest city of Surabaya Sunday morning.

Police said at least five suicide bombers were involved, including at least one on a motorcycle and a woman who had two children with her, according to The Associated Press.

Updated on Sunday at 9:15 p.m. ET

In what is being investigated as a terrorism incident, a man wielding a knife attacked five people on Saturday night, killing at least one and injuring four others, two seriously.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that the assailant was shot dead by police. The attack occurred in central Paris, near the Opera Garnier.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons released revisions to its Transgender Offender Manual on Friday. Notably, the rewritten manual gets rid of language asking that an inmate's gender identity, not the sex they were assigned at birth, be considered when recommending a housing facility for them.

Stephen Hawking's ashes will be interred at Westminster Abbey this June. He'll take his place among giants — between Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. Applications to attend a Service of Thanksgiving are open to the public, and anyone — including people born in 2038, can apply. A thousand spaces are available.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin managed to anger both gun-rights and LGBTQ-rights activists late Friday with two separate actions.

In a rare blow to the National Rifle Association, Fallin vetoed a bill that would have loosened gun laws in the conservative state. Had it passed, SB 1212 would have allowed gun owners to carry a firearm — either open or concealed, loaded or unloaded — without a state license or permit. About a dozen states have passed similar so-called "constitutional carry" laws.

Updated at 5:20 p.m.

North Korea has announced that it will dismantle its nuclear test site. According to the Associated Press, North Korea's Foreign Ministry delivered a statement delivered through state media Saturday announcing the dismantling will occur between May 23 and 25.

A 19-year-old Sudanese girl named Noura Hussein was sentenced to death by hanging on Thursday. Her crime was murdering her husband after he tried to rape her.

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

Iraqis voted Saturday in the first parliamentary elections since defeating ISIS.

Iraqi officials had worried that security concerns would keep voters from the polls. But as polling centers closed, it was apparent that many voters stayed away from apathy rather than fear.

With more than 90 percent of the votes in, Iraq's election commission announced voter turnout of 44.5 percent. The figure is down sharply from 60 percent of eligible voters who cast their ballots in the last elections in 2014.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was reluctant to share details of his whirlwind meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a joint news conference with South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha on Friday — a day after Pompeo returned from Pyongyang.

But he did expound on the economic benefits North Korea and its people would enjoy if Kim got rid of his country's nuclear weapons.

"If Chairman Kim chooses the right path there is a future brimming with peace and prosperity for the North Korean people," Pompeo said.

President Trump's nominee for the head of the CIA, Gina Haspel, was questioned this week by the Senate intelligence committee about her role in the agency's interrogation program after the Sept. 11 attacks.

"Under my leadership, on my watch, CIA will not restart a detention and interrogation program," she told the committee. But many senators believe she did not oppose torture strongly enough, and they pressed her on what her role was in the CIA's interrogation program.

Seventy scholars from three Muslim nations issued an edict on Friday that says violent extremism and terrorism violate the principles of Islam.

The announcement was made during a conference in Indonesia. Scholars from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Indonesia convened at the presidential palace in the city of Bogor in West Java, reported The Associated Press.

Another twist has emerged in the stunning ouster of Malaysia's long-ruling party, as Anwar Ibrahim, the popular opposition leader who was jailed for sodomy in 2015, will get a royal pardon — clearing the way for him to possibly become prime minister.

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