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Just half-a-year after a federal judge tossed out three lawsuits against Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who grabbed headlines in 2015 for denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples on religious grounds, a court of appeals ruled Tuesday that the men suing Davis can continue their case.

This car race involved years of training, feats of engineering, high-profile sponsorships, competitors from around the world and a racetrack made of gold.

When Matthew Bryce paddled out into the cold surf off the west coast of Scotland, he was clad in a thick, neoprene wetsuit — gear that would stand him in good stead for a solid surf session Sunday. But at less than an inch thick, that material may not have seemed the most important bit of equipment the 22-year-old surfer brought with him.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

A former police officer in North Charleston, S.C., accused in the shooting death of an unarmed black man in 2015 has pleaded guilty to a federal civil rights charge, according to his lawyer.

The Archdiocese of Kansas City says it is severing its years-long relationship with Girl Scouts in nearly two dozen Kansas counties because the organization promotes materials "reflective of many of the troubling trends in our secular culture."

"The decision to end our relationship with Girl Scouting was not an easy one," Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann said in a statement released Monday. He asked pastors to "begin the process of transitioning away from the hosting of parish Girl Scout troops."

The European Commission will not reinstate visa requirements for Americans who want to visit Europe, despite the European Parliament's recent vote to end the preferential treatment over a lack of full visa reciprocity between the U.S. and all members of the European Union.

When some members of Congress look at the practices of U.S. airlines, they aren't just lawmakers eyeing an industry.

They're customers. And they aren't happy.

The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee held a hearing on Tuesday to address concerns over airline customer service. It was prompted by several high-profile incidents, including the violent removal of a passenger from a United Express flight.

In Japan, it costs nearly $3,000 for one person to ride on a new luxury train that launched this week, and the highest price is nearly $10,000, for what resembles a cruise ship experience traveling through Japan's scenic eastern countryside. If you want to ride, plan ahead: the train is sold out through March of 2018.

Protesters thronged outside a Seoul courtroom Tuesday, marking the start to Park Geun-hye's corruption trial with demonstrations both for and against the ousted South Korean president. In fact, the scene was so packed, one absence stood out all the more starkly: that of Park herself.

"I have a story to tell about something that happened to our family last week." That's how Jimmy Kimmel began an unusually heartfelt monologue on his late-night show Monday.

An American THAAD missile defense system is now operational in South Korea, less than two months after its components arrived there, the U.S. military says.

The system is meant to protect South Korea from ballistic missiles fired by North Korea, the Pentagon says. But China and other critics of the move say it will only increase tensions on the Korean Peninsula. The decision to install the missile shield was made by the U.S. and South Korea last July.

A May Day march in Portland, Ore., "devolved into a full-scale riot with random acts of vandalism" by anarchists late Monday, police say. Attacks on police and emergency personnel resulted in 25 arrests.

Molotov cocktails, smoke bombs and other items were thrown at police, according to member station Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Jordan Edwards, a high school freshman, was leaving a house party in a Dallas suburb late Saturday night with several friends when police officers arrived outside. The officers were investigating a complaint about noisy teenagers in the neighborhood, and they had heard gunshots in the area as they approached.

Within minutes, the black 15-year-old passenger had been killed — shot in the head by an officer through the front passenger window and pronounced dead at the hospital shortly afterward.

After nearly two years of missed payments and delayed actions, Puerto Rico is bumping up against another deadline as it tries to grapple with tens of billions of dollars of debt.

One proposal for partial repayment of the debt was rejected over the weekend. Another option is for the island to essentially declare bankruptcy, through a process created specifically for Puerto Rico.

After midnight on Monday, if some sort of deal has not been struck, the U.S. territory will be fair game for lawsuits by its creditors.

Authorities in South Sudan detained Eyder Peralta, NPR's correspondent in East Africa, for roughly four days before releasing him Monday morning. Peralta and his South Sudanese assistant were first placed in custody in the city of Juba on Friday, and they were held for three nights.

It remains unclear why they were detained.

Peralta flew home unharmed to his base in Nairobi, Kenya, on Monday morning. His assistant is still in custody, however, and NPR spokeswoman Isabel Lara says the organization is now "in touch with authorities regarding his release."

As the U.S. considers sending more troops to Afghanistan and reviews its current strategy there, a new report from a U.S. government watchdog paints a bleak picture of the country's security and corruption issues.

Congress has appropriated more than $117 billion total to Afghanistan reconstruction efforts, and 60 percent of that has gone to the support the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF). At the same time, Taliban militants have gained territory during this past year, and the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan says the conflict is at a "stalemate."

The city of San Francisco has settled with Airbnb and HomeAway, concluding a lawsuit brought by the two short-term home rental companies by agreeing to new registration procedures for prospective hosts. The case, which had been heard in federal court, hinged on how the companies comply with a recently instituted city law.

Fox News co-President Bill Shine has resigned and will leave the network within a few weeks, Fox News announced Monday afternoon.

Shine's departure is part of the aftershocks of the sexual harassment scandal that has gripped the network since last summer, leading to the departure of former Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes last July and of star host Bill O'Reilly last month.

The city of Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America for damages under the Fair Housing Act, the Supreme Court says, allowing a lawsuit to continue that accuses the big banks of causing economic harm with discriminatory and predatory lending practices.

The 5-3 vote saw Chief Justice John Roberts form a majority with the court's more liberal justices. Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely seen as the court's "swing" justice, sided with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito. The court's newest justice, Neil Gorsuch, wasn't involved in the case.

If the Fyre Festival had played out according to the immaculate hype of its marketing materials, attendees would be flying home from the Bahamas right about now, sunburned and hungover from the greatest weekend of their young lives, cellphones full of models' phone numbers, #latergramming their way to legend status.

Instead, at least one of those once bright-eyed festivalgoers has filed a lawsuit and ticket buyers are receiving apologies from event organizers, who now admit that the Fyre Festival "fell dramatically short of even the most modest expectations."

During his weekly televised address Sunday, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced that he was ordering a countrywide minimum wage hike. Beginning Monday, Venezuelans on the lowest rung of the economic ladder can expect a 60 percent boost to their monthly wages.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

People are taking stock of the damage after severe weather over the weekend killed at least 14 people in five Southern states.

Flooding, lightning and tornadoes caused at least five deaths in Arkansas, four in Texas, two each in Mississippi and Missouri and one in Tennessee. The American Red Cross is calling it the deadliest start to tornado season in nine years.

San Diego police shot and killed a man suspected of shooting seven people at an apartment complex near the University of California Sunday. Witnesses say the man fired on a birthday pool party as he sat in a deck chair.

One woman died after being shot at the party. Three officers confronted the shooter after a police helicopter reported that the suspect seemed to be reloading what Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman called "a large-caliber handgun."

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET Monday

Congressional leaders have struck a deal to keep the federal government funded through September.

The budget negotiations provided Democrats with a rare opportunity for leverage and clout, since Democratic votes will be needed to advance the spending plan through the Senate — and possibly the House if enough members of the conservative Freedom Caucus vote against it.

U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the first Cuban-American elected to Congress and the first congressional Republican to publicly support marriage equality, is retiring next year at the end of her term.

During a "very friendly" phone conversation, President Donald Trump invited Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte to the White House, signaling a massive shift in attitude from the U.S. toward a leader known best for inciting an extrajudicial war on drugs in his country that's killed more than 7,500 people.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET Sunday

Multiple tornadoes rolled through a number of small towns in Texas on Saturday, in a streak of severe weather that's swept the South and the Midwest into Sunday.

A U.S. service member died Saturday from wounds sustained in an explosion outside Mosul, Iraq, according to a statement from the U.S military.

The statement offered no further details.

Iraqi troops — with the aid of U.S. forces — have been fighting to push the Islamic State out of Mosul for the past six months.

It is the second American military fatality since the Mosul operation began, reports The Military Times.

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