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A task force is recommending changes that could loosen protections for the greater sage grouse, a Western bird species renowned for its elaborate mating dance.

The report comes out of a review by the Trump administration of a massive Obama-era conservation plan for the bird which is imperiled by loss of habitat.

The administration says the revisions are aimed at giving states more flexibility. But critics argue that the changes favor mining and petroleum companies and could hurt the bird's long-term prospects.

Hackers in Venezuela attacked numerous government websites in protest of the "dictatorship" of President Nicolas Maduro.

A group calling itself "The Binary Guardians" said it hacked about 40 government sites, according to Reuters.

"Our intention is to give hope to people that no matter how strong the enemy seems, there is strength in unity," the group wrote in an email quoted by the news agency.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed spending $275 million to upgrade defenses against an invading force. The enemy? A fish. Specifically, Asian carp that are threatening to break through to the Great Lakes.

A four-floor San Francisco mansion at 26 Presidio Terrace was recently on the market for $14.5 million; 30 Presidio Terrace, a neighbor in the gated community, last sold for $9.5 million.

But Presidio Terrace itself? As in, the street? The strip of pavement these tony residents rely on to reach their front doors? The private road the homeowners association has owned for more than a century?

In a brief BBC cartoon posted to YouTube late last December, a high-ranking Roman soldier and his family tackle the challenges of daily life in ancient Britain. The dad is off helping build the famed Hadrian's wall at the province's far northern edge; the son tries to make right for losing his father's scarf. Everyone ends up happy ever after.

Three Boy Scouts have died after a sailboat they were aboard struck a low-hanging power line on a lake east of Dallas, Texas, over the weekend.

The Scouts were sailing in a Hobie Cat on the Lake O' the Pines when the catamaran's mast snagged the transmission cable.

Think of the swastika and chances are that what comes to mind is the murderous regime of Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany.

But the symbol is at least 5,000 years old and is incorporated into Hindu, Buddhist and Jain iconography. Even today, in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia it is not uncommon to see the symbol painted on buildings and vehicles as a sign of good fortune.

You might think that, after thousands of years of observing total solar eclipses, science-minded folks would have exhausted what can be learned from this awesome natural spectacle.

You would be wrong.

A top former war crimes prosecutor has quit the U.N.'s Independent Commission of Inquiry on Syria, over what she described as the Security Council's lack of political will to hold the perpetrators of war crimes accountable.

"I give up. The states in the Security Council don't want justice," Carla Del Ponte said in comments to the Swiss publication Blick, as quoted by The Associated Press. "I can't any longer be part of this commission which simply doesn't do anything."

Her departure means only two members remain on the panel.

Three-quarters of Americans believe that North Korea's nuclear program is a "critical threat" to the United States, according to a new survey released by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

The attack took all of half an hour.

That's about how long Sam Kanizay says he spent relaxing waist-deep in the waters of Melbourne, Australia's Brighton Beach on Saturday. The 16-year-old had been footsore from a round of soccer, he says, and the cold water felt pleasant as he absently listened to songs on his iPhone.

As global pressure ratchets up against North Korea with a new package of sanctions, the rogue nation is blaming the United States and threatening "ultimate measures" in response.

Updated 9:30 p.m. ET

Three U.S. Marines who were missing in the crash of an Osprey aircraft on Saturday have been declared dead.

The Pentagon identifies them as 1st Lt. Benjamin R. Cross, 26, of Oxford, Maine; Cpl. Nathaniel F. Ordway, 21, of Sedgwick, Kan.; and Pfc. Ruben P. Velasco, 19, of Los Angeles, Calif.

The MV-22 Osprey went down off Australia's east coast. The Australian navy found the wreck on Monday, one day after a search and rescue effort for the final three missing Marines aboard the plane was suspended.

Two Chinese tourists posing for cell phone pictures in front of the Reichstag, Germany's parliament building, wound up under arrest Saturday for making the Heil Hitler gesture, according to multiple media reports citing German police.

The two men, ages 36 and 49, have been released after each posting close to $600 bail.

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has apologized to a breastfeeding visitor who says she was told to cover up.

The woman, who posts on Twitter as @vaguechera, says she had "flashed a nanosecond of nipple" in the museum's courtyard when she was told to conceal her breasts. Instead of bearing that in silence, she busted out her phone and started tweeting.

She ribbed the V&A, pointing out that the museum seemed totally fine with some bare bosoms — as long as they were made of stone instead of flesh.

On Sunday, Japan marked 72 years since the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, destroying a portion of the city and its inhabitants, and heralding the end of World War II.

About 50,000 people, including representatives from 80 nations, gathered for an annual ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park Sunday, reports The Japan Times.

An improvised explosive device exploded early Saturday in a Minnesota mosque and community center.

No one was injured, but the explosion damaged an imam's office at the Dar Al Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, located near Minneapolis.

The FBI Minneapolis Field Office is now leading an investigation in cooperation with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Bloomington police and other agencies.

The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to impose new sanctions on North Korea over the country's long-range missile tests last month.

The measure cuts about $1 billion worth of North Korean exports, or about a third of the country's export revenue each year.

"This resolution is the single largest economic sanctions package ever leveled against the North Korean regime," said Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N. "This is the most stringent set of sanctions on any country in a generation.

High-profile Fox News host Eric Bolling has been suspended after HuffPost reported on Friday that he sent unwanted lewd texts with "an unsolicited photo of male genitalia" to at least three female colleagues.

Bolling co-hosts The Fox News Specialists, a daily news and talk show and is the sole host of Cashin' In, a national business analysis program, which airs on Saturday mornings.

The first Kennedy Center Honors of the Trump administration is already making waves after recipient Norman Lear announced he would be boycotting the White House reception ahead of the awards.

"As an artist and a human being, I cannot celebrate this incredible honor ... at a White House that has no interest in supporting the Arts and Humanities," the legendary television producer and writer tells NPR's Elizabeth Blair.

President Trump has proposed eliminating the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities, reports Blair.

A Northwestern University professor and an Oxford University employee were arrested Friday in California in connection with the stabbing death of a Chicago man.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET.

The U.S has suspended its search for three Marines who are missing after an MV-22 Osprey from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit "entered the water" Saturday off of Australia's east coast.

The III Marine Expeditionary Force said that following a "mishap," 23 out of 26 personnel aboard had been rescued.

Uber knowingly leased unsafe cars to its drivers in Singapore, The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday.

One of those cars, a recalled Honda Vezel with an Uber driver at the wheel, spouted flames from its dashboard in January, melting the car's interior and cracking its windshield. The driver had just dropped off a passenger when he began smelling the smoke.

Lately it's been impossible to miss.

In Warsaw and Brussels, deep in primeval forests and overlooking the soccer pitch, the bad blood between the Polish government and the European Union officials appears to be seeping into just about every evident interaction — and as European Council President Donald Tusk observed Thursday, it's threatening to rend their relationship apart.

Police forces across Europe are penning whimsical postcards to their most-wanted fugitives this summer in the hopes that increased awareness will lead to more arrests.

The fugitives addressed in "Wish you were here" postcards are accused of serious crimes in 21 European Union countries and are believed to be outside of the countries where they allegedly committed the crimes.

A federal jury in Brooklyn, N.Y., has convicted former pharmaceutical executive and "pharma bro" Martin Shkreli of securities fraud.

He was found guilty Friday on three counts — two counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud — out of a total of eight counts. Shkreli is best known for increasing the price of a life-saving drug for people with AIDS by 5,000 percent, from $13.50 to $750 per pill, when he was head of Turing Pharmaceuticals.

Nipton, Calif., 60 miles south of Las Vegas, isn't convenient to much.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court has thrown out the murder conviction of an ex-Blackwater security guard and ordered three others to be resentenced in connection with the 2007 massacre of 14 unarmed Iraqi civilians in Baghdad. The high-profile incident called into question the role played by U.S. security contractors in Iraq.

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