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Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri will be remaining in power, at least for now — despite the strange address he gave more than two weeks ago, while he was in Saudi Arabia, stating that he planned to resign.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

The Navy says eight people have been rescued and are "in good condition" after a propeller-driven C-2 Greyhound carrying 11 crew and passengers crashed in the Philippine Sea southeast of Okinawa, Japan.

"Search and rescue" for the remaining three people is still underway, the Navy says.

The ride-hailing service Uber revealed that the personal information of 57 million people — both customers and drivers — was hacked last year and that the company kept the massive theft secret for more than a year.

Uber also paid the hackers $100,000 to delete the stolen data and stay silent about it.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri returned to Beirut for the first time since sparking a political crisis in his country following his surprise resignation more than two weeks ago while visiting Saudi Arabia.

Reuters reports that Hariri was greeted by members of the security forces as his return was covered by live TV.

John Lasseter, the chief creative officer of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, says he's taking a six month leave of absence amid sexual harassment allegations.

Lasseter announced his sabbatical Tuesday.

That same day, The Hollywood Reporter published allegations that the Pixar co-founder is known for "grabbing, kissing, and making comments about physical attributes."

The jury in the month-long trial of the undocumented Mexican immigrant accused of murdering San Francisco resident Kate Steinle on a city pier two years ago has begun its deliberations.

San Francisco prosecutors say that 45-year old Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, a homeless man who had been deported multiple times, intentionally fired the single shot that killed the 32-year old Steinle as she was walking arm-in-arm with her father on July 1, 2015.

A federal judge in Maryland has temporarily blocked all of President Trump's would-be ban on transgender Americans serving in the U.S. armed forces or receiving transition-related health care through the military.

The decision comes just weeks after another federal judge, based in Washington, D.C., blocked most of the policy change.

Updated at 9:44 a.m. ET Wednesday

Election Day results in two high-stakes races for the Virginia House of Delegates remain unresolved after claims of ballot mix ups that listed incorrect candidates in some districts.

The Department of Justice has opened a probe into the role of race in Harvard University's admissions policies and is threatening to sue unless Harvard turns over documents by a Dec. 1 deadline, according to correspondence obtained by NPR.

Updated 7 a.m. Wednesday

Most of the major water companies in the United Kingdom use dowsing rods — a folk magic practice discredited by science — to find underwater pipes, according to an Oxford Ph.D. student and science video producer who accidentally discovered the practice is still in use.

The Trump administration cannot withhold federal money to punish local governments for their noncompliance with immigration authorities, according to a ruling by a federal judge in California.

In an order announced Monday, Judge William Orrick permanently blocked the policy, issued as one of President Trump's earliest executive orders, ruling it was "unduly coercive" and violated the separation of powers.

There has been yet another false alarm in the search for an Argentine submarine with 44 crew members that's been missing for nearly a week. A hopeful sound picked up by two vessels running a search pattern near the sub's last known position was likely caused by a "biological" source — meaning a sea creature, not a submersible.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Monday, a day after talks to form a new ruling coalition collapsed, signaled that she prefers a fresh election over trying to stay in power as part of a minority government.

Merkel said that she was "very skeptical" of the prospect of leading a minority government — something that hasn't even been tried since the end of World War II.

"The path to the formation of a government is proving harder than any of us had wished for," she told broadcaster public television ARD, adding that "new elections would be the better path."

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET Tuesday

Veteran television host Charlie Rose has been fired by CBS, a day after eight women told The Washington Post that he sexually harassed them between the late 1990s and 2011.

Dogs shower their owners with affection and demand walks on a regular basis. And according to medical researchers, a corresponding link between dog ownership and heart health — previously called "probable" by experts — is supported by Swedish data.

An examination of Sweden's national records — spanning more than 3.4 million people and 12 years — found that registered dog owners had a lower rate of cardiovascular disease and a lower risk of death.

Della Reese, a performer and pastor best known for her starring role on the CBS spiritual drama Touched by an Angel, has died at 86.

"Her signature television role came late in life," NPR's Eric Deggans reported. "Reese already had been famous for decades as a gospel-influenced R&B performer, TV guest star and talk show fixture."

The Department of Justice is suing to block AT&T's purchase of Time Warner, legally challenging a $85 billion deal that would give the telecom giant control of a media empire including CNN, Warner Brothers, HBO, and other major media brands.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen today announced that she will resign from the Federal Reserve Board once her successor, Jerome Powell, is sworn in.

Yellen is the first woman to serve as Fed chair. While her term as Fed chair ends in February, Yellen could have stayed on the board until 2024, serving out her 14-year term as a Fed governor. Instead she'll follow the practice of previous Fed leaders and leave the board once Powell becomes chairman.

After Hurricane Harvey, some Texas residents, politicians and scientists are wondering whether the whole U.S. system for predicting floods is any good.

The storm's deluge flooded parts of southeast Texas that had rarely, or never, been underwater before. Some areas got more than 50 inches of rain in a few days. "When the numbers started coming in it was a little scary," says Matt Zeve, the director of operations for the Harris County Flood Control District, which includes Houston.

After a Japanese man was killed early Sunday in a car crash involving a U.S. service member, U.S. forces in Japan are prohibited indefinitely from purchasing or drinking alcohol.

As an icon, the Georgia Dome stood commandingly on the Atlanta skyline. Host to the 1996 Summer Olympics, two Super Bowls and countless Atlanta Falcons home games, the imposing stadium was a fixture for roughly 2 1/2 decades, since its completion in 1992 at a cost of $214 million.

Now, it's little more than a massive heap of concrete, steel and fiberglass.

Jana Novotná, the Czech tennis star who took home 17 Grand Slam championship trophies across the span of her career, died Sunday at the age of 49. The Women's Tennis Association announced the news "with deep sadness" on Monday, saying Novotná died surrounded by family in the Czech Republic after waging "a long battle with cancer."

Updated at 6:18 a.m. ET

Kenya's Supreme Court on Monday affirmed the re-election of President Uhuru Kenyatta, dismissing two petitions that challenged last month's re-run of nationwide polling – a move likely to spark more violence in the east African country.

NPR's Eyder Peralta reports from Nairobi that the six judges of the high court agreed unanimously that the petitions have no merit. That means Kenyatta will be sworn in for another term on Nov. 28.

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