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Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

The stock market finished the day sharply higher, but only after another session of wild price swings.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed at 24,912.77, an increase of 567 points, or 2.3 percent. But it began the day down sharply, with triple-digit losses.

Other major U.S. stock indexes also rebounded Tuesday, with the S&P 500 finishing up 46 points, or 1.7 percent, and the Nasdaq up 148 points, or 2.1 percent.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET

Asian and European markets tumbled Tuesday after dizzying losses on Wall Street that saw the Dow Jones industrial average shed 4.6 percent, its biggest loss in six and a half years.

In Europe, where the trading day was in full swing, the London's FTSE 100, Germany's DAX 30 and France's CAC 40 were all trending down.

In Asia, where the exchanges had all closed:

The government of President Yameen Abdul Gayoom has arrested an opposition leader and two Supreme Court judges hours after declaring a 15-day state of emergency in the Indian Ocean country best known for its luxury tourist resorts.

The action escalates tensions after the nation's Supreme Court ordered the government to release nine jailed opposition leaders.

Opposition leader Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, who also served as president between 1978 to 2008, has been charged with bribery and attempting to overthrow the government.

Actor John Mahoney, best-known for his portrayal of the grouchy and sharp-witted father of the title character in the TV show Frasier, died Sunday. He was 77.

The Steppenwolf Theatre Company confirmed his death, saying in a statement, "John Mahoney passed away due to complications from cancer while in hospice care on Sunday."

For 11 years, from 1993 to 2004, Mahoney played the blue-collar, retired-cop foil to Kelsey Grammer and David Hyde Pierce, his dandy and effete sons on the NBC hit show.

The talent manager who helped make Halle Berry and Taraji P. Henson Hollywood stars says he will close his management agency after nine women of color accused him of sexual harassment.

Researchers have found a link between today's eight-legged spiders and an ancient group of arachnids that also possessed tails, according to two studies published in the latest issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution.

One month after a New Hampshire woman says she chose all six correct numbers for the lone $559.7 million Powerball grand prize, she has yet to turn in the ticket and the money is lying unclaimed. It's not that she doesn't want it. She just doesn't want the public to know she won it.

Doritos, For Her

Feb 5, 2018

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET on Feb. 6: After coverage of Doritos designed for women spread, the company told AdAge it is not working on a "specific Doritos product for female consumers" and said that "needs and preferences continue to evolve and we're always looking for new ways to engage and delight our consumers."

Our original post continues:

Indra Nooyi, the CEO of global giant PepsiCo, says her company is trying to solve women's "least favorite things" about Doritos by developing a version of the snack designed specifically for women.

One of the world's leading investigators into the ivory trade, Esmond Bradley Martin, was found stabbed to death at his home in Kenya on Sunday, The Associated Press reports.

Nicolas Kamwende, head of criminal investigations in Nairobi, told the AP that a family member had gone to check on Bradley Martin after he failed to respond to phone calls, and found his body on a bed with stab wounds to the neck.

Bradley Martin's innovative work as a conservationist and investigator made him one of the global authorities on elephant and rhino poaching.

A rocket more powerful than any other flying today is scheduled to blast off Tuesday for the first time, if all goes well.

Editor's Note: This story contains graphic language.

Ex-sports doctor Larry Nassar was handed his third sentence on Monday, this time of 40 to 125 years in prison after pleading guilty to molesting young gymnasts at an elite Michigan training facility.

Dozens of people gave victim statements last week in the Eaton County, Mich., courtroom. There, Randy Margraves, the father of two of them, charged at Nassar saying he wanted a minute alone with the "demon." Sheriff's deputies tackled him before he reached the former doctor.

Updated 12:40 p.m. ET

Third time's the charm. The Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England Patriots, 41 to 33, and claimed its first-ever Super Bowl title in Super Bowl LII on Sunday. The Birds had two other Super Bowl appearances to their names, in 1981, and 2005, when the Patriots beat them 24 - 21.

Backup quarterback Nick Foles led a 75-yard drive to the winning touchdown in the last three minutes of the game. A last-minute drive by the Patriots failed against the Eagles defense line, and the Eagles won 41 - 33.

The only known surviving member of the Islamic State terror cell suspected to be behind the deadly 2015 attacks on Paris was defiant in his first public appearance Monday in a Belgian courtroom.

"I do not wish to respond to any questions. I was asked to come. I came," Salah Abdeslam said in French, as translated by The Associated Press and Reuters. "I defend myself by staying silent."

When asked why he wouldn't stand, Abdeslam responded, according to reports: "I'm tired, I did not sleep."

South Africa's ruling African National Congress party is holding meetings to decide the fate of President Jacob Zuma, who is under growing pressure to step down amid corruption allegations.

The party tried and failed to secure an agreement from the 75-year-old Zuma, who has ruled South Africa since 2009, to step down voluntarily. Zuma is apparently not budging and many in the party fear that his fading support could hurt their chances to retain the presidency if he stays on until elections in 2019.

North Korea's ceremonial leader, Kim Yong Nam, will visit South Korea as part of a high-level delegation attending the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics this week amid somewhat eased tensions between the bitter rivals.

Kim is the president of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly and is the nominal head of North Korea, although nearly all real power is concentrated in the hands of third-generation hereditary ruler, Kim Jong Un.


You'd be forgiven if you went to bed early having chalked up another win for New England.

Incumbent Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades defeated leftist challenger Stavros Malas and won another five-year term in a run-off election on Sunday.

Costa Ricans are heading to the polls on Sunday to choose a new president. The race is largely upended by a debate over gay rights as many candidates in the crowded field strongly oppose same-sex marriage, which many Latin American countries have recently instated.

The Inter-American Court of Human Rights called for equal sex civil marriage rights, early in 2018. IACHR decisions are binding for Costa Rica, as signatory countries are required to allow it.

Some might chalk it up to bad luck; others, to karma.

Robert Meilhammer, 51, of Crapo, Md., was struck in the head Thursday by a dead Canada goose that plunged from the sky after a fellow waterfowl hunter fired a blind shot on a flock overhead. Meilhammer was in the midst of a hunting party with three friends in Easton, Md.

Egyptian archaeologists unearthed a well-preserved 4,400-year-old tomb from Egypt's Fifth Dynasty, a prosperous era where pharaohs ruled, palaces were erected and pyramids were built.

Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Enany said that the tomb belonged to Hetpet, a priestess to the goddess of fertility Hathor. Female priests were not common in ancient Egypt. Hathor, who also represented music and dance, had a number of them in her priesthood, reports National Geographic.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

At least two people were killed and at least 100 people were injured early Sunday morning when an Amtrak train derailed after colliding with a freight train in South Carolina.

The derailment happened in Cayce, outside of South Carolina's capital of Columbia.

Amtrak said a train going between New York and Miami "came in contact" with a CSX freight train at about 2:35 Sunday morning.

Updated 8:38 a.m. ET

A White House official confirms with NPR that Kathleen Hartnett White's controversial nomination to head the Council on Environmental Quality is being withdrawn.

Tensions can run high around family weddings, but an Oregon man took his resentment to new heights when he made two phone calls to airports falsely claiming his father and brother were terrorists, according to his own admission in a plea deal.

Sonny Donnie Smith's calls resulted in the temporary detainment and questioning of his father and brother and a missed flight. The reason? Smith was told he was not welcome at the family wedding the Smiths were traveling to, according to the plea agreement filed on Thursday.

In a rare move, the Federal Reserve announced Friday that it is restricting Wells Fargo's growth and demanding the replacement of four board members in response to "widespread consumer abuses and compliance breakdowns" at the bank.

"Until the firm makes sufficient improvements, it will be restricted from growing any larger than its total asset size as of the end of 2017," the Fed said in a statement. This is first time the Fed has placed a cap on the overall growth of a firm.

An Italian man, who reportedly ran unsuccessfully as an anti-immigrant candidate in a local election last year, wounded several foreigners in the central city of Macerata during a drive-by shooting on Saturday, according to police.

The suspect was identified as 28-year-old Luca Traini, according to multiple Italian media reports, citing police.

Intrigue around The Bachelor, ABC's long-running dating reality show, usually centers on rendered roses and resentful rivals, but one contestant on the current season made headlines this week for different reasons.

Rebekah Martinez, 22, has been seen weekly on television screens since Jan. 1, when the season debuted, and yet had also simultaneously been registered as a missing person in California's Humboldt County. That is until astute viewers and the local newspaper helped set the record straight on Thursday.

Federal prosecutors have charged Douglas Haig, a man identified earlier this week as "a person of interest" in the Las Vegas mass shooting, with selling bullets he had modified to make them more potent — referred to as armor-piercing.

The 55-year-old aerospace engineer did not have a license to manufacture and sell the armor-piercing bullets he sold to Stephen Paddock in the weeks before the massacre that left 58 people dead. Paddock died at the scene from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound.

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