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The city of Milwaukee and the family of a black man with schizophrenia who was shot dead by a police officer have reached a tentative $2.3 million settlement agreement, three years after his death.

"Officer Christopher Manney never faced criminal charges, but was fired from the police department for failing to follow protocol," LaToya Dennis of member station WUWM tells our Newscast unit. She adds that the settlement still requires the approval of the Milwaukee Common Council.

Mexico's government is contesting a new international report that says the country had 23,000 homicides in 2016 — a level surpassed only by Syria. The International Institute for Strategic Studies says that intense violence fueled by Mexico's drug cartels has reached the level of an armed conflict.

"The annual survey's lead investigator says Mexico's second-place ranking was surprising, considering the deaths are nearly all attributable to small arms," NPR's Carrie Kahn reports, "and not tanks or aircraft fire as in the political wars of Syria or Iraq."

In a rare victory for environmentalists under President Trump, the Senate rejected efforts to roll back an Obama-era rule limiting methane emissions from energy production sites on federal land.

The vote over the greenhouse gas was close — 49-51 — with Republican Sens. John McCain, Lindsey Graham and Susan Collins coming down against the resolution, which would have repealed the Bureau of Land Management's Methane Waste and Prevention Rule.

A reporter in West Virginia was arrested and charged with a crime Tuesday after he repeatedly attempted to question Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

Price was walking through a hallway in the state Capitol, which he was visiting with Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway as part of a "listening tour" on the opioid crisis. Several protesters were gathered in the hallway, as was Dan Heyman, a reporter for the Public News Service.

Years from now, a girl named Alia Joy will have a claim to fame to tell at summer camp: She was the first baby to be breast-fed on the floor of Australia's Parliament.

Her mother is Greens party co-deputy leader Larissa Waters, who was returning to Parliament after giving birth to her second child, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Betsy DeVos spoke through waves of boos and shouted protests during her commencement speech at Bethune-Cookman University on Wednesday, delivering a celebratory address with what seemed at times to be grim-faced resolve.

Six weeks after a bridge collapse shut down a crucial piece of the interstate system in Atlanta, Georgia officials say they'll be ready to reopen Interstate 85 by May 15 — more than five weeks ahead of schedule. The road normally carries nearly 250,000 vehicles a day.

Chelsea Manning, the former Army private who leaked a trove of classified documents to WikiLeaks, will be released from prison on May 17, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. Manning's 35-year prison sentence was commuted in January by then-President Barack Obama.

Most recently, Manning has been held in a prison in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. After her release, her attorney says, she'll live in Maryland.

The Federal Communications Commission's public commenting system experienced delays Sunday night. That was the same night comedian John Oliver did a segment about net neutrality on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight and encouraged viewers to file comments on the FCC's website.

In an effort to retake ISIS' last major stronghold, President Trump has approved arming Kurdish forces in Syria despite opposition from Turkey.

The U.S. will supply the Kurdish elements of the American-backed Syrian Democratic Forces "as necessary," Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said in a statement Tuesday.

The bones of a humanlike creature have puzzled scientists ever since they were found in a South African cave in 2013.

Homo naledi is primitive in some ways, with a small brain and other physical features reminiscent of our early ancestors. But it also walked upright, and had hands that may have been capable of making tools.

French police say they evacuated several makeshift settlements in Paris on Tuesday, evicting refugees and other migrants from the tents they'd been living in for months. The operation, which involved about 350 officers, unfolded without reports of violence or injury.

Cuba is not an easy place to buy things. Food is rationed, wages are low, and the black market is a way of life.

But now, Cubans can buy shirts with those little alligators on them at Lacoste. Or at L'Occitane en Provence, face cream for $162.40 an ounce. Or watches in the $10,000s.

Well, he did it — sort of.

In April, Carter Wilkerson set out on a mission to get free chicken nuggets for a year. What he may not have known was that his inquiry would become the most retweeted tweet of all time.

It was his fondness for nuggets that inspired Wilkerson to ask Wendy's how many retweets he needed to get free chicken nuggets for a year. Wendy's, playing along, set the bar high: 18 million.

Challenge accepted.

Old rocks found in the Australian Outback have some weighty implications, scientists say: They hint at the environment in which life on Earth originated and suggest a location to search for life on Mars.

Scientists in Australia say they have found biological signatures of life in rocks that also show the presence of a hot spring, lending weight to a theory that the earliest life on Earth might have originated in freshwater hot springs on land rather than in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Canceled flights, kerfuffles at the ticket counter, clashes with local law enforcement — it's fair to say that neither customers nor Spirit Airlines staff members intended their night to unfold this way at Florida's Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

The U.S. is poised to rejoin an international treaty organization that it left in 2001, after President Trump signed a bill titled the "U.S. Wants to Compete for a World Expo Act" into law. The signing comes as Minnesota looks to host a world's fair in 2023.

At first glance, the signing looks to be an odd duck navigating today's political waters. Consider these unique features:

  • The bill was sponsored by five Democrats and six Republicans
  • Trump has spoken more about taking America out of global groups than about joining them

Meet Beibeilong sinensis, the most recently identified dinosaur species.

The name means "baby dragon from China." The dinosaur had massive feathered wings and a birdlike skull. It probably looked most like a cassowary, flightless birds slightly smaller than an ostrich.

Prosecutors announced Tuesday they will not level criminal charges at Brandon Bostian, the engineer involved in the 2015 Amtrak derailment that killed eight people and injured some 200 others in Philadelphia.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

The Department of Energy has declared an emergency at a nuclear-contaminated site in Washington state, after soil caved in over a portion of a tunnel containing rail cars contaminated with nuclear waste.

"All personnel in the immediate area have been accounted for — they are safe — and there is no evidence of a radiological release," Destry Henderson, spokesperson for the Hanford site's emergency operations center, said in a brief statement on Facebook.

A Massachusetts judge has thrown out the murder conviction of Aaron Hernandez because the former NFL star died in prison before his appeal could be heard. The ruling comes nearly three weeks after Hernandez killed himself.

California may end a decades-old ban on members of the Communist Party working in its government, after the state Assembly approved a bill that would delete references to the party from its employment requirements.

The bill's sponsor, Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Oakland, said that California's laws should focus on individuals' actions and evidence rather than political affiliations and what he termed "empty labels."

The police investigation into the case dubbed the Serial Street Shooter appeared to have stalled recently — leads and information about the case had dwindled.

From August 2015 to July 2016, someone was gunning down victims after dark in a largely Latino neighborhood of Phoenix as they stood outside homes or sat in cars.

On Monday, Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams and Mayor Greg Stanton appeared with Maricopa County officials to announce there had been a break in the case.

Sinclair Broadcast Group, based outside Baltimore, announced Monday it had struck a $3.9 billion deal to obtain dozens of local television stations by acquiring Tribune Media.

The move, seen as likely to win approval of federal regulators with only modest concessions, would further propel consolidation in the industry. It would also offer a greater reach for one of the nation's most conservative media companies.

In a decision that could have global consequences, an Austrian court ruled on Friday that Facebook must delete postings deemed to be hate speech.

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has headed to London for "follow-up medical consultation with his doctors" — though his administration has not elaborated on what, precisely, his doctors will be addressing. The visit comes as concerns simmer over the president's health, which has attracted speculation as he misses cabinet meetings and makes infrequent public appearances.

It was a matter of urgency, former acting Attorney General Sally Yates says, when she called White House lawyers back in late January.

She needed to tell them that Gen. Michael Flynn, then-national security adviser, appeared to be lying to the White House, making him vulnerable to blackmail by Moscow.

"We believed that Gen. Flynn was compromised with respect to the Russians," Yates told a Senate subcommittee on Monday. "To state the obvious, you don't want your national security adviser compromised by the Russians."

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