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The performance by Salvador Sobral, this year's winner of the Eurovision Song Contest, was different than the others.

Most of the performances are noted for a lot of glitz and being pretty cheesy.

Twenty-five competitors carried on that tradition this year — performing on a wide stage backed by flashing lights, bursts of flames and other effects.

Sobral took a different take in his performance on Saturday — singing from a small elevated circle in the middle of the crowd.

North Korea has launched a ballistic missile, the first launch since newly elected South Korean president Moon Jae-in has taken office.

Both Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe immediately condemned the launch, with Moon expressing "deep regret" that it occurred shortly after the new government was sworn in.

President Trump has been briefed on the latest missile test by North Korea.

A White House statement from press secretary Sean Spicer reads:

A case about school discipline might be heading to the Supreme Court — but the court's newest justice would likely recuse himself from the case. Neil Gorsuch wrote a cutting dissent when the case came before his appellate court, and his words are now being used by the plaintiff's lawyer.

In 2011, a seventh-grader (known as F.M. in court documents) was interrupting his gym class with fake burps. The antics were amusing his classmates, and his teacher was struggling to maintain control of the class. She called for back up, in the form of a police officer assigned to the school.

Pope Francis canonized two new saints Saturday at the beginning of a Mass in Fátima, Portugal.

Francisco and Jacinta Marto were small children in Fátima on May 13, 1917, when they said they saw a vision of the Virgin Mary while they were tending sheep. The farm town became an important Catholic shrine as a result of the children's visions, drawing pilgrims from around the world.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin wrapped up a meeting of the world's wealthiest nations with the assertion that the United States reserves the right to be protectionist.

At a news conference in Bari, Italy, where finance ministers from the Group of Seven nations gathered, Mnuchin said, "We do not want to be protectionist but we reserve our right to be protectionist to the extent that we believe trade is not free and fair."

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro has brought criminal charges against the engineer who was operating Amtrak 188 when it derailed, killing eight people and injuring over 200 two years ago.

Today marks the launch of something both old and new in Detroit: a streetcar down Woodward Avenue. The streetcar opened to the public on Friday morning, after 10 years of planning and political wrangling.

The six streetcars make a 6.6 mile loop — 3.3 miles each way — connecting downtown Detroit with the New Center neighborhood, which was home to General Motors until it decamped downtown two decades ago.

At least one person has died of the Ebola virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo in recent weeks, according to the World Health Organization. WHO says tests reflected the disease's presence in the body of the victim — one of nine people in the remote northern corner of the country to contract hemorrhagic fever since April 22.

Three of them have died, though at this point, only one case has been confirmed by the country's National Institute of Biomedical Research as the Zaire strain of Ebola.

The Marine Corps has released a recruiting ad that, for the first time, focuses on a female Marine in combat.

A shooting at a nursing home in Ohio left four people dead on Friday morning. The deceased were the Kirkersville police chief, two employees of the nursing home and the suspected shooter.

The Columbus Dispatch reports:

"The chief responded to a report of a man with a gun at the Pine Kirk nursing home at 7:50 a.m. in downtown Kirkersville in western Licking County.

Updated Sat. May 13 at 10:10 a.m. ET

Cyber security experts are still scrambling to contain a global ransomware attack that has infected tens of thousands of computers in nearly 100 countries, including the U.S., U.K., Russia, China, Ukraine, and India.

A muggle mystery is afoot in the U.K.

Sometime over a span of a week and a half in mid-April, a burglar (or several) broke into a property in a Birmingham suburb, stealing jewelry and one item that's even more valuable — certainly to Harry Potter fans, at least: an 800-word, handwritten prequel to the series, scrawled on a postcard by J.K. Rowling herself.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

In a memo to staff, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered federal prosecutors to "charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense" — a move that marks a significant reversal of Obama-era policies on low-level drug crimes.

The two-page memo, which was publicly released Friday, lays out a policy of strict enforcement that rolls back the comparatively lenient stance established by Eric Holder, one of Sessions' predecessors under President Barack Obama.

Just days after her comments to Chinese investors set conflict-of-interest questions swirling, Jared Kushner's sister will not be holding a similar presentation that had been scheduled for Saturday. Nicole Kushner Meyer, who has been in China courting investors interested in the family firm's stateside real estate development, had drawn significant criticism for mentioning her family's White House connections in a pitch last weekend.

Two days after prosecutors announced they would not bring criminal charges against an Amtrak engineer involved in a 2015 derailment, a Philadelphia judge has ordered his arrest.

Municipal Court Judge Marsha Neifield on Thursday ordered the arrest of engineer Brandon Bostian on charges of involuntary manslaughter and reckless endangerment.

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is marking his release from federal custody with an appeal for vindication by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Blankenship served a one-year federal prison sentence after being convicted of conspiracy to violate federal mine safety laws. The charges stemmed from the disaster at a Massey Energy mine in West Virginia in 2010 that left 29 coal miners dead.

The number of new Hepatitis C cases leaped nearly 300 percent from 2010 to 2015, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And the CDC points to the likely culprit behind the spike in cases of the infectious disease: the use of heroin and other injection drugs.

Former U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown has been found guilty of siphoning hundreds of thousands of dollars from a charity that she and her chief of staff had passed off as a scholarship service for students. The Florida Democrat had faced 22 counts ranging from conspiracy to tax fraud; she was convicted of 18.

A few blocks east of the Brandenburg Gate, Cityhostel Berlin offers cheap rooms and spotty Wi-Fi in a large, gated 1970s building.

But it turns out the hostel is more interesting than its exterior suggests: The building is owned and leased out by North Korea.

The glaciers in Montana's Glacier National Park are rapidly disappearing.

Some have been reduced by as much as 85 percent over the past 50 years, while the average loss is 39 percent, according to a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University.

The researchers looked at historic trends for 39 glaciers, 37 of which are found in the park. The other two are on U.S. Forest Service land.

Most radio listeners who hear a public service announcement about child pornography would expect it to focus on fighting crime and stopping abuse. But for at least two years, the audience of an Arizona radio station instead heard tips on avoiding prosecution over possessing photos of "naked juveniles."

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced that as of next year, it will no longer participate in the Boy Scouts' programs for older teenagers.

Tesla is now accepting deposits for its new solar roof system, offering an "infinity" warranty for tiles that integrate solar power into roof coverings. Installations will begin in June, the company says.

Workers in New Orleans dismantled the city's Jefferson Davis monument early Thursday, removing the prominent statue of the Confederate leader that had stood for more than 100 years.

"This historic moment is an opportunity to join together as one city and redefine our future," Mayor Mitch Landrieu said as he announced that crews had begun removing the statue, the second of four planned removals of Confederacy-related monuments.

The Senate Intelligence Committee issued a subpoena for President Trump's former national security adviser Gen. Michael Flynn.

Problems continue to mount for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. To high unemployment, a lagging economy and billions in public debt, add unsafe drinking water to the island's list of woes.

This was not exactly the decision VG Media had hoped for.

The collective of German publishers had sued Google, arguing that the tech giant has infringed on copyright protections by offering snippets of the publishers' articles in search results. Those snippets, according to VG Media, hurt the publishers' bottom line by sating potential readers' curiosity and violated a 2013 German law that requires compensation for those snippets of text.

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