Music News

Music News
3:06 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

The 'Singing Sound' Of Saxophonist Charles Lloyd

Charles Lloyd, 75, continues to tour widely.
Dorothy Darr ECM Records

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:31 pm

Charles Lloyd has a way of talking that sounds a lot like the notes from his saxophone: full of youthful energy, yet packed with experiences reserved for grownups.

Read more
The Record
3:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Gangsta Rap Swap Meet Proprietor Wan Joon Kim Has Died

Wan Joon Kim (right), with his son Kirk and wife, Boo Ja, at their stall inside the Compton Swap Meet last January.
Courtesy of Sam Quinones

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:49 pm

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
10:16 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Marches Madness: Heralding The Pope

A marching band perfroms before the introduction of Pope Francis at St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday in Vatican City.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 6:56 am

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
1:52 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Breaking: Pope Francis I Loves Opera

The newly elected Pope Francis (formerly known as opera lover and Argentine Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio) appears on the balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 13, 2013 in Vatican City.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 8:38 am

Here's a quick side note to today's big news ...

Immediately after the announcement of the papal election result and the name the new pope had chosen, Brian Williams of NBC News asked New York's Cardinal Edward Egan about the new pontiff, Francis.

"Your Eminence?" Williams said.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:09 am
Wed March 13, 2013

The Ale That Men Brew: Iron Maiden Serves Up A Beer

Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson samples his band's latest offering, Trooper ale, made with what he calls "our special secret-squirrel recipe."
Iron Maiden Beer

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 2:12 pm

Three decades after giving the world The Number of the Beast, Iron Maiden is poised to release its latest work — and it's a beer. That's the latest from the Metal Injection website, whose "Bands and Booze" section makes it uniquely qualified to present such news.

Read more
Jazz
1:22 pm
Sat March 9, 2013

Tadd Dameron, A Jazz Master With A 'Lyrical Grace'

Tadd Dameron (smiling at center) was an important figure in American jazz and bebop. He is shown here with Fats Navarro on trumpet, and Charlie Rouse and Ernie Henry on saxophone.
William Gottlieb Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 4:30 am

In the 1940s and '50s, Tadd Dameron worked with everyone who was anyone in jazz, from Miles Davis to Artie Shaw, Count Basie to John Coltrane. Everything Dameron touched had one thing in common, says Paul Combs, author of Dameronia: The Life and Work of Tadd Dameron.

"A penchant for lyricism," Combs says. "Almost everything that he writes has a very lyrical grace to it."

Read more
The Record
4:18 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Stompin' Tom Connors, Canadian Folk Hero, Has Died

Stompin' Tom Connors performs at the 2008 NHL Awards at Elgin Theatre in Toronto, Canada.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Stompin' Tom Connors was a Canadian folk legend. He was 77 when he died Wednesday at his home in Ontario. To those of us stateside, his most well-known tune is "The Hockey Song," played at hockey games everywhere. But to Canadians, Stompin' Tom Connors was an inspiration because of his naked nationalist pride.

Read more
Music News
2:49 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Britain's Brass Bands: A Working-Class Tradition On The Wane

Cornetist Adam Rosbottom rehearses with the Grimethorpe Colliery Band in January. The band was founded in South Yorkshire, England, in 1917.
Christopher Werth

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 9:49 am

The world often feels full of fading traditions, from drive-in movie theaters to the dying art of good old-fashioned letter writing.

For the British, add brass bands to that list. Traditional brass bands have played an important cultural role in working-class British communities for centuries. But some warn that without funding, they could become a thing of the past.

Take the Grimethorpe Colliery Band in South Yorkshire. The band was originally formed in 1917, and nearly 100 years later, a group of tuba, euphonium and other horn players still bears the band's name.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:54 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Alvin Lee Is Going Home: 'Ten Years After' Guitarist Dies

Alvin Lee performing with Ten Years After in the early 1970s.
Lebre Sylvie Dalle /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 7:18 am

Guitarist Alvin Lee, whose incendiary performance with the British band Ten Years After was one of the highlights of the 1969 Woodstock festival, has died.

He was 68. Lee's website says he "passed away early this morning [Wednesday] after unforeseen complications following a routine surgical procedure." An assistant to his daughter also confirmed the news to NPR.

His band's biggest hit — "I'd Love to Change the World" — came a couple years after Woodstock. We'll embed a clip from that.

Read more
All Tech Considered
8:51 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Why The Library Of Congress Has A Lock On Your Phone

A law designed to protect copyrights on music and movies put digital locks on all sorts of things.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 9:56 am

What it means to own something in the digital age is being re-negotiated.

Few of us own the music we listen to or the movies we watch in exactly the same way we did a decade ago. And today if you buy a smartphone from a cellphone company, what you can legally do with it — how and where you can use it — may be proscribed even if that phone is fully bought and paid for.

I keep a lot of music on my phone. I have the Stones, Janis Joplin and OK Go.

Read more
The Record
10:11 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Why I'm Not Going To SXSW This Year

SXSW festival-goers line up at The Parish on Sixth Street in Austin for NPR Music's day party March 15, 2012.
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

As a music journalist from the North Country, I'd be a fool to pass up the opportunity to head down Austin, Texas, each March for the South by Southwest Music Conference. It provides those of us on the ice-whipped prairie a respite from our endless winter season, not to mention a chance to binge on the best burgeoning artists before they make their way around the country on tour. It's become something of a requisite for many of the musicians, writers, photographers and fans from my hometown.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:42 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Justin Bieber Apologizes For Delay In Start Of London Concert

Justin Bieber performs live at 02 Arena on Monday.
Jim Dyson Getty Images

Screaming, crying fans are par for the course if you're teen idol Justin Bieber. But this is a bit different.

After a Monday concert at London's O2 Arena that reportedly started two hours late, the 19-year-old pop star has been forced to apologize for upsetting disappointed young concertgoers and their angry parents.

In a series of tweets Tuesday, Bieber issued his mea culpa:

Read more
Remembrances
2:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Three Motown Artists Die Within Weeks Of Each Other

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:34 pm

Audie Cornish has more on three Motown artists who died recently — Bobby Rogers, a founding member of the hit-making Motown group the Miracles; Richard Street, a member of the Temptations; and Damon Harris, who sang with the Temptations on many of their hits.

The Record
1:23 am
Mon March 4, 2013

How One Band Turned A Ghost Town Into A Giant Recording Studio

Part of the abandoned mining apparatus in the town of Piramida.
Courtesy of Efterklang

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 11:02 am

Read more
The Record
12:40 am
Fri March 1, 2013

David Bowie, Rock's Shape Shifter, Returns

David Bowie's album, The Next Day, will come out on March 12.
Jimmy King Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 7:41 am

Hear Ann Powers talk about David Bowie's career, and his new album, with Morning Edition's Renee Montagne by clicking the audio link above.

Read more
The Record
11:15 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Richard Street, Of The Temptations, Has Died

The Temptations circa 1974. They are, clockwise from the left, Dennis Edwards, Melvin Franklin, Richard Street, Otis Williams and Damon Harris.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Richard Street, for nearly three decades a member of The Temptations, has died. He is the second former member of the fabled Motown group to pass away in two weeks; last week former Tempations tenor Damon Harris died. Both singers can be heard on the 1972 hit "Papa Was A Rolling Stone."

Read more
The Record
6:03 am
Thu February 28, 2013

How A Studio Changes Your Sound

Gary's Electric Studio in Brooklyn's Greenpoint neighborhood.
Courtesy of Mexican Summer/Kemado/Software

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 10:26 am

Read more
The Record
3:11 pm
Wed February 27, 2013

SFX Entertainment Buys Beatport

beatport.com

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 4:04 pm

Beatport, one of the most popular online stores for fans of dance music, has been bought by SFX Entertainment, a company that has invested heavily in the dance music business over the past year. According to sources with direct knowledge of the deal, the company was sold for around $50 million.

"[With this purchase] you now have a great one-stop shop for consumers of dance music," says SFX Entertainment CMO Chris Stephenson.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
11:50 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Remembering Van Cliburn, A Giant Among Pianists And A Cold War Idol

A youthful Van Cliburn, captured mid-concerto.
Courtesy of the Van Cliburn Foundation

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:37 am

Read more
Music News
12:03 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Exiled From Iran, A Singer Makes The Case For Beauty

Strict laws made it impossible for the Iranian singer Hani to pursue her dream in her home country.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 7:03 pm

A petite woman prances across the stage at Kurdistan TV in Erbil, northern Iraq, with her long, brown hair bouncing behind her.

A band begins to play, the studio audience falls quiet, and the woman starts to sing. Her voice is powerful and her message is personal: It's about fleeing to a foreign land to find freedom.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:45 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

The Operatic Potential Of DSK, A Modern Don Giovanni

Disgraced former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn leaves court in Paris Tuesday after attending a hearing regarding his seizure request for a new book by Argentinian-born Marcela Iacub detailing their liason.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

If I wrote operas, my next work would be called DSKNY. That's a snazzy abbreviation for Dominique Strauss-Kahn New York. The idea came last night when colleagues invited me for cocktails at the Sofitel Hotel, the site of DSK's alleged sexual assault of a hotel maid in 2011, and the beginning of his fall from grace.

Read more
The Record
2:25 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

A Tiny Bit Of Good News For The Record Industry

Stacking coins, not paper.
istockphoto.com

There's reason to be optimistic about the market for recorded music around the world, according to a new report released by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. For the first time since 1999, the report says, the global trade value for the recorded music industry (a slightly vague/confusing term for record sales) went up last year by about 0.3 percent.

Read more
Music News
1:41 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Women Of Grunge Reclaim Rock History In 'These Streets'

Ron Nine, Mitch Ebert, Eden Schwartz, Fiia McGann and Gretta Harley perform in These Streets, a new play based on a series of interviews with Seattle musicians.
Courtesy of These Streets

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 5:05 pm

Gretta Harley arrived in Seattle in 1990, when grunge was redefining the city. Bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden were turning Seattle into the epicenter of the music world. Harley was a punk rock guitarist searching for her tribe, and in Seattle's thriving music scene, she found it.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
10:27 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Remembering Wolfgang Sawallisch, A Conductor Who Blossomed In Philadelphia

The late conductor Wolfgang Sawallisch, captured in rehearsals for a recording of Wagner's Die Meistersinger.
Vivianne Purdom courtesy of EMI Classics

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 9:30 am

Read more
The Record
5:03 am
Sat February 23, 2013

Music, The Food Of 'Amour'

Emmanuelle Riva in Michael Haneke's Amour.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat February 23, 2013 9:31 am

Film scores are, by and large, manipulative. They do their work at the periphery of the senses, signaling danger, heralding victory, prodding us toward fear and joy in time with the unfolding story. Crucially, they are also empathic, letting us in on what the actors' words or faces may not convey. And when things get unpleasant, the score can step in as an emotional buffer — a layer of unreality between us and the action that lets us know we're safe. Sunday night at the Oscars, Hollywood will honor a film whose music manages to get all these things right.

Read more
The Record
4:03 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Music's New 'Real Ambassadors'

The band noori was invited by the State Department to tour the U.S., as part of a program called Center Stage.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 6:32 pm

Read more
Music News
3:51 pm
Thu February 21, 2013

Where Does The Harlem Shake Actually Come From?

G Dep in "Let's Get It."
Vimeo

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 8:26 am

Read more
The Record
10:54 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Long Before The Harlem Shake, We Did The Shimmy

Gilda Grey, the dancer who is sometimes credited with naming the shimmy, in London in 1928.
Planet News Archive SSPL via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 7:47 am

Read more
Music News
1:20 am
Mon February 18, 2013

'China's Leonard Cohen' Calls Out Political Corruption

Zuoxiao Zuzhou performing at his first concert in Beijing in two years on Jan. 18.
Yao Lei Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:42 am

Zuoxiao Zuzhou is a Chinese singer whose accented, croaky voice is hardly ever in tune. But for his fans he's the voice of a generation — one of the very few voices who dare to speak out. After a collaboration, Cowboy Junkies member Michael Timmins called him "China's Leonard Cohen."

Read more
Music News
3:21 am
Sun February 17, 2013

Haitian Musicians Get By With A Little Help From Their Friends

Singer-songwriter Amos Dolce on the set of the video for his song "Haiti, Haiti," which Konbit Mizik produced.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 7:23 am

Read more

Pages