KTEP Local

Chopin is credited with originating the modern piano style, and the music of this fine romantic composer is featured in the 22nd season of the El Paso Chopin Festival to provide an opportunity for residents and  visitors to to hear the piano played with unsurpassed elegance, power, and expression.

The twenty-second season of El Paso’s Chopin Festival promises to be another year of musical excellence, returning once again with several free performances. Here to talk about it are Dr. Lucy Scarborough and Joyce Whiteside.

Get Out The Vote is a civic engagement initiative that encourages designers to use their unique voice to educate the public, and excite them about participating in the electoral process.

In the past month, AIGA El Paso has received some very engaging posters that create a dialogue about the importance of voting for our community. You are invited to join them at Proper Printshop on Tuesday, September 13 and see these wonderful submissions along with one poster pre-selected to be screen printed live at the show.

  The summer is slowly transitioning into fall.  Our grass is not as lush, our trees are not as vibrant, and our summer vegetable crop is coming to an end.  It's time to start thinking about fall gardening - get your winter veggies ready!  Let's get our minds off of tomatoes and squash and on to garlic, cilantro, and greens.  Master Gardener Jan Petrzelka will also be telling us about why pomegranate trees make such a terrific addition to any landscape.

Aired Sept 10, 2016

  Guest hosts Felipa Solis and Kyle Alvarado are raging film buffs, and they join us on this program to share their opinions about a couple of very different movies that are making waves with critics and audiences alike: "Don't Breathe," about a group of young home invaders who are clueless about the deadly abilities of their blind target...and "Hell or High Water," about two brothers who plan a heist against the bank that is foreclosing on their family ranch.

Aired Sept 10, 2016

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / UTEP Communications

  Human cadavers are often used in training medical students, but they are also useful in helping physical & occupational therapists familiarize themselves with the intricacies of human musculature and the delicate nature of tendons and veins.  The UTEP College of Health Sciences recently unveiled its Human Anatomy Teaching Laboratory, and on this program, we'll visit with the director of the lab, Mark Caulkins.

Aired Sept 9, 2016

  Time to sow seeds of snapdragons, dianthus, pansies, and other winter flowers in flats for planting outdoors during October.

Dig and divided spring flowering bulbs and perennials such as daffodil, iris, daylily, ajuga, liriope, and canna.

Plant leaf and root vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, radish, spinach, and lettuce late in the month.

This month or early next month, sow seeds of wildflowers into weed-free, well-tilled soil.


  The American Chemical Society (ACS) is the world's largest scientific society, and this year they will be selecting a new president to serve in 2017.  On this program, we'll hear from this year's candidates: Peter K. Dorhout, Vice President for Research at Kansas State University, and Thomas R. Gilbert, Acting Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Northeastern University.  The candidates will talk about some of the issues important to the chemical community, including the rising unemployment rates of newly-graduated chemists.

Learn more about the candidates at http://www.peterdorhoutacs.com/ and https://sites.google.com/site/thomasgilbertacs/.

Aired Sept 4, 2016

  J.A. Jance's 2015 novel DOWNFALL revisits Cochise County Sheriff Joanna Brady, who is both pregnant AND facing a re-election bid as she investigates the case of what could be a murder/suicide or double homicide in Arizona.  Jance joins us on the  KTEP Book Club on PERSPECTIVES to tell us more about the book and how she weaves her personal life into her stories.


Aired Sept 4, 2016

  Joseph Somoza is a former English professor at Texas Western (now known as UTEP).  He joins us on this show to share his early memories of El Paso, his Spanish roots, his transition from pre-med to English, and his "backyard poetry" which is reflected in his new collection "As Far as I Know," published by Cinco Puntos Press.

Aired Sept 4, 2016


Gardening tools are some of the most handy ways to keep a landscape in check, whether is a nifty weed hoe or a bulb planter. On this program, we'll talk about some of our favorite gardening tools!

Aired Sept 3, 2016

  Henry C. Trost was one of the most iconic architects of the Southwest, and he is responsible for over 200 buildings in El Paso, including the Camino Real, the Cortez Building, and El Paso High School.  The Texas Trost Society works to promote Trost's legacy and to educate the public about the importance of preserving these historically important buildings.  Joining us on this program are Max Grossman, Vice Chair of the El Paso County Historical Commission, and Malissa Arras, Executive Director of the Texas Trost Society.


Aired Sept 3, 2016

  The U.S. Army has a strong presence in El Paso thanks to Fort Bliss.  The presence will be felt even more when UTEP hosts Army on September 17 at the Sun Bowl.  To tell us more about this highly-anticipated football game and about El Paso's special relationship with Fort Bliss is Chris Park of UTEP Athletics and LTC Craig Childs of Fort Bliss.  The game will include discounts for military, free giveaways to fans, and lots of fun.

Tickets are available at http://www.utepathletics.com/, at 915-747-6150, and at the UTEP Ticket Center.

Aired Sept 3, 2016

Meet the vecinos of calle Mango through the eyes of twelve-year-old Esperanza. Her story tracks the ups and downs we all face during the tricky times of adolescence. We are invited to join the UTEP Department of Theater and Dance as they bring the stories of Sandra Cisneros’ critically acclaimed novel The House on Mango Street to life on stage. 

El Paso High School is 100 years old and the fourth installment of their Legacy Series program focuses on “100 Years of Excellence in the Arts”. The program takes place on Thursday, September 8, 2016 with Felipa Solis as the featured speaker. 

  Throughout the decades, the cinema has not shied away from addressing political or social issues, whether directly or metaphorically.  The Sunset Film Society is screening classic films whose messages are still relevant today.  To tell us more is Sunset Film Society Founder Jay Duncan.

Films screen Saturdays at 2pm at the International Museum of Art, 1211 Montana.  http://www.sunsetfilmsociety.org

  • Sept 3: Gabriel Over the White House (1933)
  • Sept 10: The Boy with Green Hair (1948)
  • Sept 17: The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
  • Sept 24: On the Beach (1959)

Aired Sept 3, 2016

 As of August 1, individuals with a Texas concealed handgun license are allowed to carry concealed handguns on public university campuses throughout the state.  To tell us more about the CAMPUS CARRY law and how it applies to UTEP is Gary Edens, Vice President for Student Affairs, and Catie McCorry Andalis, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students. 


Aired Sept 2, 2016

  Mark Renfield is an author and vegan chef whose new book "Healing the Vegan Way" walks vegans or vegans-to-be through delicious, filling recipes that take readers from salads to vegan sloppy joes and beyond!  Reinfeld talks about why "food activism" is probably the best way to get people turned on to a plant-based, compassionate lifestyle.  http://veganfusion.com/

Aired Aug. 28, 2016

WildEarth Guardians

  The latest vegan-related news and animal activism.

Millennials are behind the meteoric rise of veganism in Europe.  Read more at http://veganenthusiasts.com/2016/08/19/millennials-driving-a-rise-of-veganism/

Krill-based omega supplements are depleting the Antarctic of a specials critical to aquatic life and other Antarctic life.  Read more at http://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/omega-supplement-killing-marine-animals/

The Texas Hornshell is a mussel that is being recommended for endangered species protection due to damming and overuse of the Rio Grande.  Read more at  https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2016/texas-hornshell-08-09-2016.html

Aired Aug. 28, 2016

Oregon State University

**Rebroadcast from Feb. 24, 2013**  

Keith talks with May Nyman, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Oregon State University.  She talks about her time at Sandia National Laboratories researching nuclear waste management and using titanium dioxide to quickly and more efficiently absorb radioactive strontium, neptunium, and plutonium.  She also talks about the benefits of virtual collaboration with other universities on conducting research. 


Aired Aug. 28, 2016.

  Dr. Thomas Dent Mütter was born at a time doctors rarely washed their hands or used anesthesia. In the bestselling book DR. MÜTTER’S MARVELS: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine, Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz explores the previously untold life story of this young, handsome and ambitiously brilliant surgeon whose talents in the operating room and lectures halls were unrivaled in his lifetime.  www.aptowicz.com Aired Aug. 28, 2016

  Ross Gay is a American poet and author of 3 books.   His latest collection, Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, was the winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, was  a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, and was nominated for an NAACP Image Award.  Ross joins us on this program to talk about why Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude is all about elegy with healthy doses of joy.

Ross will also read to us "To My Friend's Big Sister" from his collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude.


Aired Aug. 28, 2016


  Richard Lange is the President of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, and dean of the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine.  He joins us to talk about why TTUHSC's success is greatly due to community involvement, and about the extensive collaboration the medical center takes part in across the region.  Dr. Lange also talks about plans for an upcoming dental school in El Paso.

Learn more about El Paso's medical school at http://elpaso.ttuhsc.edu/.

Aired Aug. 27, 2016

  People living with obesity face a number of obstacles, including discrimination and obesity bias. And the cause of their obesity is not always reduced to just choice or lack of motivation.  On this program we'll visit with Leah Whigham, Executive Director of the Paso del Norte Institute for Healthy Living, who'll educate us on evidence-based approaches to improving health and reducing the causes of obesity in our community.


Aired Aug. 27, 2016

The Let There Be Rock school is a brand new music school that looks to provide young musicians with a path toward improving their skill set.

As a performance-based school, kids come and take private lessons, are then paired up with a band, once they're in a band, they name their band and have rehearsals every week, just like the pros do. Here to tell us about Let There Be Rock is Pepe Clarke.

A 'Giant' Story explores the film’s main themes along with its ties to El Paso.

The exhibit at the El Paso Museum of History includes authentic costumes worn by Elizabeth Taylor, James Dean and Rock Hudson, photos, production art and documents as well as memorabilia from the collections of El Pasoan Wally Cech, who worked as a waitress on the Marfa shoot, and Nancy Hamilton, who covered the movie’s El Paso premiere at the Plaza Theatre on November 8, 1956 for the El Paso Times.

Ben Fyffe details the exhibit.


  Oleander might not be toxic to those little aphids who swarm the plant in the spring, but it is toxic to humans and to pets. The ingestion of 1 leaf can cause severe illness or even death. If you have pets, you may wonder what plants in your landscape might be toxic. You may also be surprised as to the number of plants on that list. 

On this program, we'll hear about some of the plants that may be harmful to your domestic animals, and why you shouldn't necessarily panic and yank everything in your yard out of the ground!

Here are some helpful online resources:  https://hort.purdue.edu/ext/poisonousplants.htmlhttp://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plantshttp://www.cceoneida.com/home-and-garden/factsheets/plants-and-fungi/toxic-plants/

Aired Aug 27, 2016

  Princess Leia in Star Wars...Furiosa in Fury Road...Mammy in Gone with the Wind...

What do these characters have in common?  They are strong female characters in film.  The Alliance for Women Film Journalists has compiled a list of the top 55 women in cinema - the Wonder Women.  Jennifer Merin, founder and president of the AWFJ joins us on this program to tell us more.


Aired Aug. 27, 2016

  MINERPALOOZA is UTEP's welcome-back event for its students. On this program, Christian Corrales will tell us about all the events and live bands that will be taking part in UTEP's biggest tradition taking place August 26.




  *Rebroadcast from Feb 10, 2013*

Keith talks with Gregory O.D. Smith, Chairman of URENCO United Kingdon, and Chief Cultural Officer at URENCO Group.  At the time of this interview in 2012, Smith was president and CEO of EURENCO, a uranium enrichment company located in Eunice, New Mexico.  Smith talks about the large, fast centrifuges that separate uranium-238 from uranium-235 and result in an enriched uranium product for nuclear power plants. www.eurenco.com

Aired Aug 21, 2016

  Inspired by a true story, Amy Stewart came across an old news story about an old buggy accident at the turn of the century.  She spun that story into the tale of Constance and her sisters, who had been living a quiet life to hide a family secret...until a belligerent silk factory owner runs down their buggy and brings the sisters back into the spotlight.  Stewart joins us on this program to tell us more about what inspired the story.


Aired Aug. 21, 2016