KTEP - El Paso, Texas

KTEP Local

The 19th century French socialist journalist Felix Pyat sent a letter to Benito Juarez that was later published as "Carta a Juarez y a Sus Amigos." It was originally written in French and translated into Spanish. The English translation has since been lost. UTEP has collaborated with the Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez to publish a trilingual version of that letter. Joining us on this program are Jane Evans of the UTEP Department of Languages and Linguistics, and writer Roberto Perezdiaz, a retired court interpreter, who both played a part in the trilingual translation. Aired Nov. 18, 2016

Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce CEO Richard Dayoub chats with Congressman Beto O'Rourke about the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), global trade issues, global political upheaval, and the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). Aired Nov. 12, 2016

Host Louie Saenz reviews the Presidential Election of 2016 with Mary Benanti, Associate Professor at the New Mexico State University Women's Studies Program; and Tony Payan of the James Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. They discuss the results of the Nov. 8 election, voter dissatisfaction, polling inaccuracies, and the influence of the media. Aired Nov. 12, 2016

Vegan foods are one of the fastest growing products in supermarkets, and are no longer relegated to specialty markets or online mail order. Allyson Kramer is a cookbook author, and her latest book "Naturally Lean," not only offers vegan recipes for Cheesy BBQ Kale Chips and Avocado Chick'n Salad ...these recipes are also gluten free and under 300 calories! Kramer was diagnosed with Celiac disease, and these recipes offer delicious and easy ways to work healthy, decadent meals into a diet that is anything but restrictive.
http://www.allysonkramer.com/ Aired Nov. 13, 2016

Rutz Group

The latest animal rights and vegetarian/vegan news: The journal Open Science reports on tool making by wild crows in the South Pacific. Read this report from BBC News: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-37024393 The Union of Concerned Scientists is ranking beef producers for their use of deforestation-free beef. Beef production is the leading cause of deforestation in South America. Read more at http://www.ucsusa.org/global-warming/stop-deforestation/drivers-of-deforestation-2016-beef-cattle#.WCC4Ri0rK70 The World Wildlife Fund reports on a sharp decline in wildlife in the last 42 years, due solely to human activity. Read more at http://www.worldwildlife.org/press-releases/food-and-energy-demand-drives-58-percent-decline-in-global-wildlife-populations-new-wwf-report Aired Nov 13, 2016

Naval Research Laboratory

Radiation from the sun relentlessly bombards the earth, and our atmosphere protects us from photons and solar wind. How much does this solar radiation contribute to climate change? On this program, we'll visit with Judith Lean, researcher with the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Science Division. She'll talk about solar radiation, solar cycles, and whether these cycles are reflected in the Earth's ever-increasing surface temperature. Aired Nov 13, 2016

Three sisters became two when one of them disappeared as a teenager. 20 years later, the two remaining sisters rarely speak, and their lives veered off into vastly different directions. The two are brought together after the murder of one of their husbands, and how his death may be linked to their sister's disappearance. Author KARIN SLAUGHTER joins us on this to talk about her 2015 novel PRETTY GIRLS. Slaughter's newest book, The Kept Woman, was published in July 2016. http://karinslaughter.com/ Aired Nov 13, 2016

Host Daniel Chacón reflects on those days on which he feels ugly...and why he chose to embrace the ugly. He employs that level of acceptance when he feels unworthy of interviewing some of the amazing writers we have had on our program. Aired Nov 13, 2016

For her first collection of poetry "Look," Solmaz Sharif lifted words and phrases from the US Defense Department's "Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms." In adopting words such as "Friendly Fire," or even the title of the book "Look," Solmaz poetically re-writes the dictionary in order to remove violence from the language. Solmaz will also read the poem "Desired Appreciation" from the collection. https://solmazsharif.com Aired Nov. 13, 2016

Rooted in Mexican tradition and infused with Texas food culture, tacos are some of Texans’ all-time favorite foods. In The Tacos of Texas, taco journalists Mando Rayo and Jarod Neece take us on a delicious taco tour around the state as they discover the traditions, recipes, stories, and personalities behind Tacos across Texas. These Taco journalists spent a lot of time in El Paso and met and featured over 15 El Pasoans in their book.

Shakespeare on the Rocks is closing its 28th season with Romeo and Julieta, the bilingual adaptation of The Bard’s immortal love story. This year’s production is set in the 19th century along the US-Mexico border. Romeo y Julieta will be performed on Friday and Saturday, November 18 and 19 at the Chamizal Memorial Theater.

Women filmmakers in El Paso are a strong, united force, and on this program, we'll visit with Angie Reza Tures, organizer of the Femme Frontera Filmmaker Showcase. The festival will feature films by Laura Bustillos Jáquez, Iliana Sosa, Ilana Lapid, Jazmin Harvey, Yennifer Lucero, and Angie Reza Tures. The public has 2 chances to catch these films: Mon. Nov 14 at 6:30pm at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema ($7), and Tue. Nov 16 at 4:30pm at the El Paso Public Library downtown branch (free). https://www.facebook.com/femmefrontera/ Aired Nov. 12, 2016

UTEP Music Department

**AUDIO IS FORTHCOMING** Brad Genevro is the UTEP Director of Bands. He joins us on this program to tell us more about upcoming programs and exciting collaborations that involve the Music Department's various band ensembles. http://www.utep.edu/music/ Aired Nov. 11, 2016

Gardening Checklist for November This is still a great time to plant trees and shrubs , although the selection at local nurseries and garden shops may not be that extensive. Many garden centers have much less inventory in the fall than they do in the spring, when temperatures are beginning to warm up and more people have gardening on their minds. If planning to order any seeds for planting next spring , go ahead and order them now—you’ll be more certain of...

On November 8th, voters across El Paso will not just be voting for their next president. Voters living in the El Paso Independent School District will also be voting whether to approve a $668 million bond that will include rebuilding or partial rebuilding of 7 district high schools, technology upgrades, transportation, and much more. To tell us more about the bond is Dori Fenenbock, President of the EPISD Board of Trustees; and Juan Cabrera, Superintendent of EPISD. Learn more at https://www.episd.org/episdbond/ . Aired Nov 5, 2016

We'll revisit Statistics in this episode with Mindy McCann, Professor and Graduate Coordinator for the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University. She'll discuss her early fascination with statistics, and familiarize us with the concepts of Multiple Comparisons, Confidence Intervals, and Error Rates. McCann will also explain why one can never have a zero-percent error rate in statistical studies. Aired Nov 6, 2016

JAMES FREY is best known as the author of the controversial memoir "A Million Little Pieces." But to younger readers, Frey is responsible for creating The Endgame trilogy. The book "Sky Key" is the sequel to "Endgame: The Calling." Long ago, extraterrestrials chose 12 families to be on the lookout for signs of the Endgame. A survivor must be the one to find the 3 keys to determine the fate of humanity. The search for 3 keys continues. Earth Key has been found, and the hunt for Sky Key has begun. How will the Endgame be played, and how far will the players go to acquire the Sky Key?
http://bigjimindustries.com/wordpress/ Aired Nov. 6, 2016

Jesús Castillo's first book, Remains, is different than most poetry collections as it is actually a serial poem - a single poem separated by stanzas and sections. No narrative streak runs through the poem, but a reader can enter any page or any stanza and be enveloped by imagery and landscape. Aired Nov. 6, 2016

In the 1970s, the Mexican government adopted an initiative to promote family planning among its citizens. IUDs, intrauterine devices, were one of the options available to women. IUDs are considered Long Acting and Reversable Contraceptives, or LARCs, and their use in Mexico far outweighed their use in the United States. Researchers at the University of Texas investigated the use of LARCs in Austin and El Paso, and they share some surprising results with us on this program. We'll visit with Joseph Potter, PhD, principal investigator of the Texas Policy Evaluation Project; and Kari White, PhD, investigator of the Texas Policy Evaluation Project Read the full report, "The Availability and Use of Postpartum LARC in Mexico and Among Hispanics in the United States," at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10995-016-2179-6 Aired Nov. 5, 2016

The transformation of downtown El Paso takes another big step when the Artspace El Paso Lofts, an exciting mixed-use development for artists and creative businesses, opens its doors in early 2017. Artspace is currenlty taking resident applications and here to tell us about living in Artspace is Kathleen Decker.

The El Paso Museum of Art presents a recent body of work by James Drake, an artist with El Paso connections who has several works in the Museum’s collection, and who has garnered international acclaim. Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, James Drake: Anatomy of Drawing and Space (Brain Trash) is the culmination of two years of active creation revisiting and reinventing imagery from throughout the artist’s forty-year career.

The month of October was one of the warmest & driest on record. Now that we're finally seeing cooler weather, what do we need to do in our yards? We need to keep watering our trees, plant colorful fall annuals, and enjoy the fall bloom in our roses. Aired Nov 5, 2016

In July 1984, a killer with a hatred towards Mexicans and Mexican-Americans open fired in a McDonalds in San Ysidro, California. He killed 21 people...making this the worst mass shooting in the United States at the time. Filmmaker Charlie Minn, whose films focus on innocent victims and underdogs, focused on the survivors and their tales of courage in his latest film "77 Minutes." The film opens in El Paso at Premiere Cinemas at Bassett Place on Nov. 11. Aired Nov. 5, 2016

The Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts at UTEP is hosting 3 Fall exhibits, and to tell us more about them and the other lectures and workshops at the Rubin Center is Director Kerry Doyle and research fellow Areli Rocha. http://rubin.utep.edu/ Aired Nov. 4, 2016

Campus Faculty Association, University of Illinois

Lawrence Hubert is Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Psychology, Statistics and Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is also a co-author (with Howard Wainer) of the text, “A Statistical Guide for the Ethically Perplexed.” He joins us on this program to talk about his "accidental" career path that began with Sputnik, and about the controversy that sometimes surrounds statistics and reproducibility. Aired Oct. 30, 2016

Choosing a college can be a daunting choice for many high school students. Undergrads College Consulting Tours offers enterprising students an opportunity to learn vital leadership and networking skills, and then takes them on tours of Ivy League colleges where they can take personalized tours of the campuses and meet students and academics. On this program we'll visit with Daniel Valdez, executive director of Undergraduate College Consulting Tours; and Josh Ramirez, an Eastwood High School Senior who participated in the program and hopes to attend Yale as a result of his experience. Applications for 2017 are being accepted at http://www.undergradscct.com/ . Aired Oct. 29, 2016

Donna Arp Weitzman is a successful career woman who entered a relationship late in life, and while she thought she found her Prince Charming, she ended up hearing lots of unusual comments from friends & family. She took a satirical look at that time in her life with her first book, "Cinderella has Cellulite: And Other Musings from a Last Wife." http://donnaarpweitzman.com/ Aired Oct. 30, 2016

Carlos Espinoza is a former student of host Daniel Chacon, and an instructor at El Paso Community College. Espinoza is also the editor of the new literary journal Barrio Panther, a collection of art, poetry, and images that fits in the palm of your hand. Submissions are welcome by anyone with something to share at barriopanther@gmail.com . Espinoza is also a poet, and for our Poem of the Week, he reads "Missing Juarez" from his collection "How to Lie to a Customs Agent." http://www.barriopanther.com/ Aired Oct. 30, 2016

James Robert Murphy is a local musician and writer. His 4th book is called "The Right to Kill," and it follows a group of characters living in a Texas where a "Right to Kill" law has been passed. Citizens can petition the state to kill anyone they consider a nuisance, as long as the petitioner is the one carrying out the murder. http://www.jamesrobertmurphy.com/ Aired Oct. 30, 2016

La Mujer Obrera will be hosting a celebration of the Dia de los Muertos this weekend at Cafe Mayapan. To tell us more about the event and about the organization will be Cemelli de Aztlan and Latin Grammy nominee, Amalia Mondragon. Host Louie Saenz will be joined by one of KTEP's fine student interns, Alyssa Cardona. The event is Sat. Oct. 29 from 3-10pm at 2000 Texas Avenue. https://www.facebook.com/mujerobrera Aired Oct 29, 2016

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