Weekend All Things Considered

Saturday at 3pm and Sunday at 4pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.

Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America.

Every weekend All Things Considered presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a521e1c8e336c082c3ab|5182a519e1c8e336c082c388

Pages

Sports
3:13 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

U.S. Faces Long Odds In First World Cup Match

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 4:38 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. For American soccer fans the wait is almost over. Tomorrow in Natal, Brazil the U.S. men's national team plays its first game of the World Cup. And it's a tough one - Ghana. The West African nation has walk knocked the US out of the last two World Cups. Joining me now from Natal to talk a little soccer strategy and weather is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Tom, I here you've been getting a little bit of rain down there.

Read more
Remembrances
3:12 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

Casey Kasem, A Signature Voice Of American Radio, Dies At 82

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 4:38 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

An iconic voice of American radio has died.

CASEY KASEM: Hello again and welcome to American Top 40. My name's Casey Kasem and I'm all set to count down the biggest hits in the USA.

RATH: Casey Kasem hosted American Top 40 for four decades. He presented the week's hits with a sincerity and authority that made him essential learning for millions of Americans every weekend. Casey Kasem died today at the age of 82. NPR's Bilal Qureshi has this remembrance.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:11 pm
Sun June 15, 2014

From Resumes To Romance, Giving Young Dads The Skills To Succeed

Members of the L.A. Fathers Program practice a role-playing exercise — standing on chairs and yelling to see what it feels like when an adult yells at a child.
Courtesy L.A. Fathers Program

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 4:38 pm

On a Wednesday night, just a few days before Fathers Day, a group of young men gather in a classroom on the fourth floor of Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. There's food — pizza, soda and cookies — and the men stack their paper plates high before settling into their seats around the table in the center of the room. The meeting is about to begin.

Read more
Business
3:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

In Silicon Valley, Some Entrepreneurs Seek Social Change

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 4:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Every now and then, you'll hear story about a kid who has a lemonade stand or cupcake sale to raise money for a good cause. Beyond that heartwarming headline is a belief that you can do capitalism with a conscience. Well, this is an idea that has taken root in Silicon Valley, in a big, big way.

Carlos Watson is the co-founder of the online magazine, Ozy. He says that young entrepreneurs there are starting businesses for social change. So, Carlos, who are these idealists? And what are the causes they want to support?

Read more
NPR Story
3:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

In 'Bootleg,' Kilgariff Sets Her Comic Commentary To Music

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 4:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Again, thanks for listening. This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. Comedian Karen Kilgariff has gone through a number of transformations, over the years. She was a mainstay on the California stand-up scene before she became a cast member on the revolutionary sketch program "Mr. Show With Bob And David." She was the long-time head writer for Ellen DeGeneres. Now she has emerged as a singer-songwriter, a pretty twisted one. Her new album is called "Live At The Bootleg."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I WANT TO WIN")

Read more
Technology
3:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Moving Beyond The Turing Test To Judge Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 4:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. The code breaking skills of mathematician Alan Turing helped the Allies win World War II. He also devised the Turing Test, a measure of artificial intelligence. Last week, a computer program pretending to be a 13-year-old boy named Eugene Gustman was the first to pass the test - meaning the age of artificial intelligence has begun - maybe. Gary Marcus is a professor of cognitive science at New York University. I asked him to explain how the test works.

Read more
Music Interviews
4:23 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

Jenny Scheinman made her name in the New York City jazz scene, but she grew up on a bluff in Northern California's Humboldt County, where she now lives again.
Joshua Black Wilkins Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:31 pm

For more conversations with music makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Week's Must Read
3:27 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Eric Cantor And A Defeat Of Biblical Proportions

cover detail

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:52 pm

After his unexpected defeat in the Republican primary, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor opened a press conference by saying, "In the Jewish faith, you know, I grew up, went to Hebrew school, read a lot in the Old Testament, and you learn a lot about individual setbacks."

This is not mere piety, and the King James Version of the Bible, made up of the Old Testament and the New, is a terrific book. The heroes of these stories do not lead the race wire to wire. Those who are elevated are tested and taught by disaster.

Read more
Movie Interviews
3:24 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Tip From Ben Stiller: On Set, A 'Chicken' Is Not What It Seems

When Ben Stiller hears "chicken in the gate," rarely does he actually present someone with a live chicken.
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 10:14 am

Each line of work has its own cryptic code: words and phrases that would baffle any outsider. These terms may sound like nonsense to someone with untrained ears, but to those who operate in a certain world, their meanings are as clear as day.

To get a better handle on some of the stranger things people say at work, All Things Considered is kicking off a new series called "Trade Lingo." It's a quest to mine the jewels of meaning beneath the jargon.

Read more
Iraq
3:05 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

With Iraq In Turmoil, Kirkuk's Leader Says Region Is Calm

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: As ISIS militants have rolled south through Iraq, closing in on Baghdad, there's a very different story in the northern city of Kirkuk. There Kurdish peshmerga soldiers have taken over after the Iraqi army fled.

Kirkuk is a huge prize. It's got rich oilfields, and for years, the city has been hotly contested between Kurds and the Iraqi government. I'm joined now by the Kurdish governor of the Kirkuk province, Dr. Najmaldin Karim. Dr. Karim, welcome to the program.

GOVERNOR NAJMALDIN KARIM: Thank you.

Read more
Code Switch
5:43 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Ruby Dee: An Actress Who Marched On Washington And Onto The Screen

Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee at the 1989 Cannes Festival for the showing of Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing.
Courtesy of David Lee/All Rights Reserved

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:58 am

Born Ruby Ann Wallace in the early 1920s in Cleveland, actress and civil rights activist Ruby Dee most identified with the part of New York City where she was raised.

"I don't know who I would be if I weren't this child from Harlem, this woman from Harlem. It's in me so deep," Dee told NPR's Tell Me More in 2007.

She died Wednesday of natural causes at her home in New Rochelle, N.Y., surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She was 91.

Read more
The Salt
4:43 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

POM Wonderful Wins A Round In Food Fight With Coca-Cola

POM sued Coca-Cola, claiming that it was losing sales because the label and advertising for its Minute Maid pomegranate-blueberry drink were misleading consumers into believing they were getting a juice combination consisting mainly of pomegranate and blueberry juices when, in fact, the juice was more than 99 percent apple and grape juices, which are far cheaper.
Courtesy of the Coca-Cola Co.

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:47 am

A food fight at the U.S. Supreme Court ended in a unanimous decision on Thursday.

The justices ruled that POM Wonderful can go forward with a lawsuit alleging Coca-Cola Co. tricked consumers and stole business from POM with false and misleading juice labels.

The case centers on a product aimed at health-conscious consumers: pomegranate-blueberry juice.

Read more
Poetry
3:29 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

New Poet Laureate: 'The Meaning Has Always Stayed The Same'

Charles Wright, a retired professor at the University of Virginia, has been named the nation's next poet laureate.
Holly Wright Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

The Library of Congress announced Thursday that the nation's next poet laureate will be Charles Wright, a retired professor at the University of Virginia.

"I'm very honored and flattered to be picked, but also somewhat confused," the poet told The New York Times. "I really don't know what I'm supposed to do. But as soon as I find out, I'll do it."

Read more
Sports
3:18 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Brazil And Croatia Open World Cup Play On The Pitch

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

Brazil and Croatia face off in the first game of the 2014 World Cup. Organizers hope the start of the tournament directs attention back on the field and away from the problems in preparation.

Author Interviews
3:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Former BP CEO: 'Glass Closet' Still Holds Many Gay Workers Back

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:30 pm

"It was time to leave the building."

So begins a new book by John Browne, former CEO of the energy giant BP. But that sentence could easily have read: "It was time to leave the closet."

During his 12 years as CEO, he never discussed his sexuality in the workplace. That changed in 2007, when his relationship with a male escort was exposed and Browne resigned amid an ensuing scandal. At the time, he said in a statement, "I have always regarded my sexuality as a personal matter, to be kept private."

Read more
Europe
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Are 'Color Revolutions' A New Front In U.S.-Russia Tensions?

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. relations with Russia are at their lowest point since the Cold War thanks to the crisis in Ukraine. Russian defense officials are talking about a new doctrine of subversive warfare between major world powers. They accuse the West of using popular uprisings to topple unfriendly governments. And some analysts say Moscow itself is employing that strategy in eastern Ukraine. More from NPR's Corey Flintoff.

Read more
Iraq
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

As Militants Sweep South Across Iraq, A View From The North

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 9:22 pm

A shift in power is underway in Iraq, where the jihadi group ISIS has captured several cities in a recent offensive. Jane Arraf is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, and she comments on the violence.

Latin America
2:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Brazilians Greet The World Cup Kickoff With Protests And Tear Gas

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

In Brazil, thousands of protesters clashed with police just hours before the World Cup opening ceremony. The streets of Sao Paolo were filled with tear gas and concussion grenades.

Politics
2:01 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Once A GOP Pillar, Chamber Of Commerce Is Now A Lightning Rod

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:44 pm

The Chamber of Commerce says it tried to help Eric Cantor in his primary campaign, but Cantor refused the offer.

Around the Nation
3:40 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Orlando Steps Up To Make Its Streets More Pedestrian-Friendly

Florida is home to the country's four most dangerous large metro areas for pedestrians, according to a new national study. Orlando tops the list, followed by Tampa, Jacksonville and Miami, pictured above.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:39 pm

Semoran Boulevard in Orlando, lined with gas stations, strip malls and bus stops, is a good example of what's wrong with the roads in this busy Florida city.

It's the most dangerous street in a city that ranks No. 1 in the nation for pedestrian accidents, according to a recent national study. There have been 28 crashes involving pedestrians — and six deaths — on this stretch of road over the past seven years.

Read more
National Security
3:16 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Defending Bergdahl Deal, Hagel Faces Critics On Both Sides Of Aisle

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel testified before the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday, defending the prisoner swap that freed Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Politics
3:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

In A Rare Act Of Bipartisan Speed, Senate Passes VA Reforms

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

The Senate has passed a bill to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs. Like a similar bill in the House, the Senate bill gives veterans the option of seeking private care if the VA takes too long and makes it easier to fire VA employees. But the Senate version also spends a lot more money on doctors and hospitals than the House version.

Economy
3:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A Campaign To House The Homeless Reaches A Milestone

Mallyveen Teah relaxes in his Arlington, Va., apartment after work.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

Mallyveen Teah, 53, has been homeless or couch surfing on and off for the past 25 years. Now, he walks from his job at a construction site in Arlington, Va., to his new home, a one-bedroom apartment.

"Something as simple as giving a person a set of keys to their own place makes a huge difference in terms of their outlook on life, the world," he says.

Read more
U.S.
3:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

At The Head Of Her Class, And Homeless

Rashema Melson lives in the D.C. General homeless shelter with her mother and two brothers. "Because you live in a shelter — that's not who you are, that's just where you reside at for the moment," she says.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

On Wednesday, Rashema Melson will graduate at the top of her class as the valedictorian of Anacostia High School in Washington, D.C. She's headed to Georgetown University this fall on a full scholarship.

Read more
Media
3:04 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

To Defeat A Goliath, David Brat Got Help In Conservative Media

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In trying to reconstruct how Congressman Cantor was defeated, another partial explanation surfaced in the media. Perhaps, it was the media. Here's NPR's media correspondent, David Folkenflik.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: David Brat had a pretty clear idea of at least one of the keys to his victory. He identified it this morning on "The Laura Ingraham Show."

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "THE LAURA INGRAHAM SHOW")

LAURA INGRAHAM: Hey Dave, how are you?

Read more
Education
2:26 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

A High School Band Where Everyone's Voice Can Be Heard

Adam Goldberg, the creator of the PS 177 band, conducting at band practice.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:53 pm

(This is Part 2 of a two-part report. Read the full piece here.)

On the surface, the PS 177 Technology Band looks like a typical high school orchestra. But there are two big differences. First, while they use traditional instruments, they also play iPads. And all of the band members have disabilities. Some have autism spectrum disorders.

"I'm Tobi Lakes. I'm 15 years old. I'm in ninth grade. I'm four grades away from college."

Read more
Law
2:18 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Las Vegas Shooting Returns Police Attention To Bundy's Ranch

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

Las Vegas police are now confirming that law enforcement officials made three prior contacts with the suspects of a recent shooting spree that left five people dead, including two police officers. Authorities found no indication during those visits that Jerad Miller and his wife, Amanda, planned to carry out violence. The couple's anti-government and anti-law enforcement sentiments continue to be the focus of the investigation.

Sports
2:18 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

The Woes Of The World Cup Fans Far From Home

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:24 pm

It isn't easy being a World Cup fan in a country where spouses and bosses just don't understand soccer. WNYC's Jim O'Grady reports that some immigrants with World Cup fever in the U.S. must go to great lengths to catch their home country's games on TV.

Politics
7:26 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Upset Of Eric Cantor Deals A Shock To GOP Establishment

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:20 pm

Eric Cantor became the first house majority leader ever to lose a primary, losing the GOP nomination to Tea Party challenger David Brat in the Republican primary.

Politics
6:31 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Tea Party Challenger Upsets Eric Cantor In GOP Primary

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:25 pm

In a surprise result, voters in Virginia's 7th Congressional District have dealt a defeat to House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, nominating Tea Party challenger David Brat instead in the GOP primary.

Pages