Weekend All Things Considered

Saturday at 3pm and Sunday at 4pm

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.

Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America.

Every weekend All Things Considered presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Sports
4:54 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Baseball Has An Elbow Problem: More Pros Getting Ligament Surgery

After this pitch on May 27, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett left the game with a torn elbow ligament. Friday, he became the latest pro to undergo "Tommy John" surgery.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 1:13 pm

On Friday, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett became the latest player this season to undergo "Tommy John" surgery. In this weekend's MLB draft, at least four players selected had already had the infamous elbow surgery as amateurs.

The operation is named after the first player to undergo the procedure to fix an injured elbow ligament, in 1974. Pitchers are particularly vulnerable to this injury.

The procedure involves taking a tendon from somewhere else in the body — or from a cadaver — and grafting it into place. Pitchers get it most often.

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Around the Nation
4:43 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

When A Parent Goes To Prison, A Child Also Pays A Price

Ifetayo Harvey's father went to prison when she was 4 years old and released when she was 12. Now 22, she says the experience helped her empathize with others and understand people from a different perspective.
Courtesy of Ifetayo Harvey

When she was a child, 22-year-old Ifetayo Harvey's father was sentenced to prison for cocaine trafficking.

"My dad went to prison when I was 4 years old, and he was released when I was 12," Harvey says.

Harvey is one of millions of young people who grew up with a parent in prison. A recent study from the National Academy of Sciences examined the growth of incarceration in the United States, and among the topics was the effect on kids and families when a parent goes to prison.

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NPR Story
4:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Scientist Touts Exoskeleton That Could Offer A Chance To Walk Again

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 11:20 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This Thursday, the eyes of the world will be on Brazil during the World Cup's opening ceremony. And there'll be a remarkable moment during that event. From São Paulo, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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U.S.
4:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Was There Incentive At VA For Behavior That Created Scandal?

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It's time to fix the Department of Veterans Affairs. That's the consensus in Washington, where a bipartisan bill to do just that is expected to hit the floor this week. At least 18 veterans died while waiting for doctors appointments at a VA hospital in Arizona. While we still don't know if they died because of the wait, acting VA Secretary, Sloan Gibson, says the VA has failed America's veterans.

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Latin America
3:24 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Hopping From Venezuela To Colombia To Evade Currency Controls

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 4:42 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Author Interviews
4:46 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

'Take This Man': Uncovering A Mother's Reinventions

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 6:08 pm

When Brando Skyhorse was 5 years old, his mother said she would take him to meet his father. They took a train from California to Illinois, where, at a prison, he met Paul Skyhorse Johnson, a Native American political activist who'd been incarcerated for armed robbery.

"He looked literally like the part of a stereotypical American Indian brave," Brando tells NPR's Arun Rath. "And I thought, 'Oh good God, this is my dad? This looks great!' "

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Religion
4:25 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Lessons From The Language Boot Camp For Mormon Missionaries

Mormon missionaries pray before the start of their Mandarin Chinese class at the Missionary Training Center, in Provo, Utah.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:01 am

On a sunny Wednesday in Provo, Utah, a long line of cars spits out about 300 new arrivals to the Missionary Training Center. The facility, known as MTC, is the largest language training school for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Every year, about 36,000 students come to the center before they leave on missions around the world to spread the Mormon faith.

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Business
4:25 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

'Downton Abbey' Craze Serves Up A Demand For Butlers

Jim Carter as Mr. Carson in Downton Abbey, which has helped fuel a growing demand for butlers around the world.
WGBH/PBS

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 3:05 pm

Butlers in American pop culture tend to provide comic relief — think The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air or The Birdcage. Or, like Batman's Alfred, the butler is more of a friend than an employee.

But one show has brought back the classic butler, with a vengeance. Since the British period drama Downton Abbey made its debut on PBS in 2010, the demand for butlers in some parts of the world has surged.

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Middle East
2:31 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

A Resurgence Of Al-Qaida Likely, Expert Says

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 5:45 pm

While drone operations have badly damaged al-Qaida's infrastructure over the past five years, Bruce Reidel tells NPR's Arun Rath that a resurgence of the militant group should be expected.

Around the Nation
2:31 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

How Bergdahl's Release Fits In The History Of Prisoner Exchanges

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 5:45 pm

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with military historian Paul Springer, author of America's Captives, about the history of prisoner exchanges in times of war.

Parallels
5:18 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

American Detained In Honduras: 'We Came With An Open Heart'

Robert Mayne is being held in a Honduran prison with five other Americans on suspicion of smuggling weapons into the country.
Michael McCabe

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:49 pm

Six Americans remain in a rural Honduran prison after being arrested last month on suspicion of smuggling weapons into the country. The men arrived in the Central American nation by boat, ready to begin work on a salvage project along the northern Honduran coast. The men say the guns were on the boat for protection from pirates.

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Music News
3:49 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Nobody Panic! It's Only A Pop Song About Sex

Like the song says, his wife's gone to the country and, well, you fill in the blanks.
Courtesy of Jody Rosen

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 9:36 am

Before 1909, American pop songs could be romantic and even coy about sex. But none were so explicit about adultery as "I Love My Wife — But Oh! You Kid!" about a married man named Jonesy and the young lass who catches his eye.

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Monkey See
3:47 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

'I Kinda Stole The Show': Laverne Cox And The Path To Prestige Television

Laverne Cox of Netflix's Orange is the New Black.
Netflix

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

"My femininity was seen as a problem that needed to be solved."

Laverne Cox is talking about her childhood in Mobile, Ala. She remembers being routinely chased and beaten by classmates after school. Cox was born biologically male, and her gender identity was confusing and threatening not just to other children but to the grown-ups in her life as well. Her third-grade teacher warned her mother, "Your son is going to end up in New Orleans wearing a dress if we don't get him into therapy right away."

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Sports
3:47 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

A Campaign To Bring Back 'America's Distance': The 1-Mile Race

Jim Ryun becomes the first high-schooler to break the four-minute-mile record, with a run of 3:59 in 1964. He went on to break the record three more times while in high school.
Gary Estes MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:45 pm

Fifty years ago this week, teenager Jim Ryun of Wichita, Kan., ran a mile in under four minutes, the first high school boy to break the mythical barrier. But in the past few decades, the mile as a racing distance has fallen out of favor.

Ryan Lamppa is trying to bring it back.

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Law
3:11 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Prison Rape Law A Decade Old, But Most States Not In Compliance

Texas Gov. Rick Perry says following federal standards for the Prison Rape Elimination Act is too burdensome for states.
Tom Pennington MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

The clock is ticking on a decade-long effort to prevent sexual violence inside American prisons. In a recent survey, the vast majority of states said they will try to comply with federal rules. But several others, led by Texas, have protested to the Justice Department.

Jan Lastocy served 15 months in a Michigan prison for attempted embezzlement — her first brush with the law. The assaults began when a new corrections officer showed up at the warehouse where she had been assigned to work as a secretary.

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History
3:05 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

One Day At Normandy Sent Ripples Across Two Veterans' Lives

D-Day veteran Ralph Frias was a linguist and forward observer with the 19th Corps 963 Battalion and went over the Normandy cliffs in search of American paratroopers. After the fighting, he interviewed German POWs and French civilians.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

Robert Siegel speaks with Ralph Frias and Eugene Levine, two veterans of the D-Day landings in Normandy 70 years ago. They offer stories of their experiences and relate what it was like to take part in a day that changed the world.

"I have four brothers who came back horribly disturbed by Vietnam and Korea. I vowed that I would try not to become eaten up by the war."

-- D-Day veteran Ralph Frias

"I was changed by the fact that I survived. We even had to make out wills."

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Law
3:02 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Open Carry Activists Bear Arms In The Streets — And Chipotle

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 4:02 pm

As part of the open carry movement, some gun rights activists in Texas have been carrying loaded rifles into restaurants to assert their second amendment rights. A growing list of national chains has pushed back, though, instituting no-guns policies in response. Even the National Rifle Association has publicly rebuked the Texas long-gun enthusiasts. NPR's John Burnett covers a street demonstration by a particularly aggressive chapter of the open carry movement in Fort Worth, Texas.

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Politics
2:13 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

What Happened To Unemployment Benefits?

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 7:46 pm

Five months have passed since the expiration of the emergency unemployment benefits program for the long-term unemployed. Amid congressional delays, it's unclear whether those benefits ever will be extended.

From Our Listeners
2:13 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Letters: Ex-Cons' Struggles To Make It On The Outside

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

I'm Audie Cornish and it's time now for your letters. Earlier this week, we ran a two-part series about what happens when older prison inmates return to the outside world. For two years, NPR's Laura Sullivan followed a couple of aging ex-cons as they made their way through life, not sure if they deserve a second chance.

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Sports
2:13 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Hopes Ride On California Chrome, As Colt Bears Down On Triple Crown

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 5:29 pm

The third jewel in horse racing's Triple Crown will be run Saturday at the Belmont Stakes. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins Audie Cornish to talk about California Chrome's chance to become the first horse to win all three races since 1978.

Around the Nation
4:53 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Stay-At-Home Dads On The Rise, And Many Of Them Are Poor

The number of fathers in the U.S. who stay at home with their children has nearly doubled since 1989.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:38 am

The number of dads staying at home with their children has nearly doubled in the past two decades, and the diversity among them defies the stereotype of the highly educated young father who stays home to let his wife focus on her career.

A new study from the Pew Research Center finds that almost 2 million fathers are at home, up from 1.1 million in 1989. Nearly half of those men live in poverty.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Quick DNA Tests Crack Medical Mysteries Otherwise Missed

Doctors used a rapid DNA test to identify a Wisconsin teen's unusual infection with Leptospira bacteria (yellow), which are common in the tropics.
CDC/Rob Weyant

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 7:07 am

Researchers are developing a radical way to diagnose infectious diseases. Instead of guessing what a patient might have, and ordering one test after another, this new technology starts with no assumptions.

The technology starts with a sample of blood or spinal fluid from an infected person and searches through all the DNA in it, looking for sequences that came from a virus, a bacterium, a fungus or even a parasite.

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Theater
2:56 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

In Leap From Page To Stage, UK's Take On 'Catch-22' Gets It Right

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Catch-22 is widely considered a great novel; until now, it has been a disaster as a play. Though Joseph Heller adapted his work for the stage decades ago, every production had been a failure. Now, however, a new production of his play seems to have broken the curse: It is touring the UK and receiving strong reviews.

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Code Switch
2:32 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Mississippi Marks 50 Years Since History-Changing 'Freedom Summer'

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives includes photographs, excerpts from journals and film clips documenting 1964's Freedom Summer.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:50 pm

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives takes you back in time. The facade of a front porch, complete with screen door, invites you to imagine what it was like for some 900 activists, mostly white college students, who in 1964 came to the nation's most closed society.

Robert Moses was an organizer of what was at the time formally known as the Mississippi Summer Project.

"That's sort of what was nice about it. There was no pretension that we were going to change history," Moses says. "We were just going to have our little summer project."

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Technology
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Using Social Media, Jihadi Groups Stay On Message

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. >>CORNISH: It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. The Taliban scored a propaganda coup when it's video of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release went viral. The video was so popular that within hours the Taliban website crashed. Jihadi groups from Afghanistan to Iraq to Syria, have developed sophisticated media campaigns to get their messages out and attract new followers. And as NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports, social media is playing a bigger and bigger role.

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Around the Nation
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Bergdahl Homecoming Party Canceled, As Joy Turns To Worry

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Business
2:16 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Sprint Might Finally Get Its Way With Possible T-Mobile Deal

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Sprint has made no secret of its designs on its smaller rival, T-Mobile. And today, there were multiple reports of a tentative deal valued at around $32 billion. Sprint chairman, Masayoshi Son, has said a deal would make it possible for Sprint to offer more competition in high-speed Internet. But as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, there are still plenty of obstacles to the proposed takeover.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

An Underwater Race To Transplant Miami's Rare Corals

Close-up of a star coral rescued by Coral Morphologic from a reef in Miami's shipping channel.
Courtesy of Coral Morphologic

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

A lab just off Florida's Miami River has become the base for an unusual lifesaving operation.

A group of scientists there is on an urgent mission to save as many corals as it can before the marine creatures are destroyed as part of an underwater excavation of Miami's shipping channel. The channel — set to be dredged and deepened on Saturday — is home to a thriving coral reef.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Ex-Ambassador To Syria: Civil War Could Drag On For Years

Former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford covers his nose from the smell of dead bodies during a visit to a mass grave in the country in 2011. Ford has criticized the U.S. failure to back opposition forces early on.
Bassem Tellawi AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

When Robert Ford — the U.S. ambassador to Syria — resigned in February, he said he no longer felt he could defend American policy in that country. Ford faults the U.S. for having been unable to address the root causes of the conflict and for being consistently behind the curve as the Syrian civil war intensified.

The diplomat had to leave Damascus in early 2012 and had been working on Syria from Washington until his resignation.

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National Security
3:00 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Despite Video Of Bergdahl's Release, Questions Dog His Capture

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 5:18 pm

Even as the Taliban released a video of Army Sgt. Bergdahl's release, questions continue to surround his initial disappearance. Bergdahl has said he was captured by the Taliban while lagging behind on a patrol. In a classified report produced in 2010, the Army paints him as a soldier troubled by U.S. policy, but it does not go so far as to call him a deserter. Still, many wonder whether Bergdahl planned to return before his capture.

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