Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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The Picture Show
1:17 am
Thu April 18, 2013

In 'Which Way,' A War Photographer In His Element

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Spc. Tad Donoho screams with pain in 2008 after being administered a "pink belly" for his birthday in Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Each member of the platoon strikes his stomach until it begins to bruise, hence the name pink belly. From the book Infidel.
Tim Hetherington Magnum Photos

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:22 am

At the 2011 Academy Awards, the film Restrepo was among the documentaries nominated for an Oscar. It follows an American platoon on a remote mountaintop in what was, at the time, the most dangerous place in Afghanistan.

To make the film, writer Sebastian Junger teamed up with British photojournalist Tim Hetherington — who, walking the red carpet that night at the Oscars, might as well have been a young actor straight out of central casting: tall, handsome, charismatic.

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Around the Nation
5:07 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Napster Billionaire Spends Big On Upcoming Wedding

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with good luck to Sean Parker and his bride-to-be. She's a singer; he's a Facebook billionaire and founder of Napster. Mr. Parker committed $10 million to their wedding. He paid for waterfalls, bridges and ancient ruins created for the occasion. Guests will wear outfits created by the costume designer from "Lord of the Rings."

Europe
5:02 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Resignation Letter Is Good Enough To Eat

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Chris Holmes worked at a London airport, but his true love was always making cakes. So Holmes decided to quit his job to run his own bake shop, which brings us to his resignation letter. He wrote it on a cake with icing. He said he wanted more time with his family. He wished his colleagues well. It took two hours, more time than he had ever spent on a birthday message or anniversary wish. A photo of his work went viral, publicity that he really felt was icing on the cake.

NPR Story
2:28 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Adding Security Along Marathons Would Be Herculean Task

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon struck at a very special type of sporting event. Marathons have been called the most democratic of sports, with the fewest physical barriers between athlete and spectator.

NPR's Mike Pesca examines whether the attack could permanently damage that accessibility.

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NPR Story
2:28 am
Wed April 17, 2013

FBI Encourages Public To Turn Over What They May Know

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The special agent in charge of the FBI Boston office hopes someone somewhere heard something that will point to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

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Code Switch
2:26 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeking Oakland's Soul In The 'New Oakland'

A DJ plays for a crowded street at Oakland's Art Murmur celebration in February.
David Kashevaroff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 6:17 pm

Oakland, Calif., was once a hub of African-American culture on the West Coast.

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Animals
12:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 11:45 am

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

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Sweetness And Light
12:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

The Pitch For More No. 42s

Jackie Robinson during spring training at Vero Beach, Fla., in March 1956. It would be Robinson's 10th and last year with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Yet another movie about Jackie Robinson arrived as baseball held its annual commemorative celebration of No. 42, but officials of the game are fretting over the fact that only 8 1/2 percent of current major leaguers are black.

Given that African-Americans only constitute about 13 percent of the U.S. population, and that rarely do we have any industry or school system or community population that correlates exactly to the whole country's racial or ethnic makeup, baseball's somewhat smaller black cohort hardly seems like an issue to agonize over.

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Around the Nation
3:46 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Changes Help San Diego Homeless, But Long Road Remains Ahead

Wanda Rayborn, 63, was homeless for nine years and was living under a tree in downtown San Diego two years ago. She now lives in a newly renovated efficiency apartment — part of an initiative to help get homeless people off the streets.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 1:05 pm

Two years ago, we reported on an ambitious campaign to end homelessness in downtown San Diego, a city with one of the largest homeless populations in the nation. The effort involved an unprecedented coalition of business leaders, community groups and government agencies.

At the time, some advocates for the homeless — after years of seeing other, failed efforts to get people off city streets — were skeptical that the campaign would amount to much.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
12:04 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Update On The Boston Marathon Bombings

President Obama makes a statement about Monday's explosions at the Boston Marathon. Morning Edition co-hosts David Greene and Steve Inskeep speak to NPR reporters covering the story in Washington and Boston.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
12:04 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Obama Calls Boston Bombings 'An Act Of Terrorism'

President Obama said the FBI is investigating Monday's twin bombings at the Boston Marathon "as an act of terrorism." Meanwhile, law enforcement officials are asking the public to submit photos and videos from the scene. And Boston Mayor Tom Menino said that as the city grieves the victims it is also proud of those who helped in the explosions' aftermath.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
8:47 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Investigating The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:04 pm

Morning Edition co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss the investigation of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions with Roger Cressey, a former counterterrorism investigator and member of the National Security Council, and NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

Deceptive Cadence
2:57 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Remembering Colin Davis, A Conductor Beloved Late In Life

The late Colin Davis conducting the last night of Proms at London's Royal Albert Hall in September 1968.
George Freston Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:59 am

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Around the Nation
5:37 am
Mon April 15, 2013

6 Year Old Takes Car Out To Get Chinese

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. People in Lapeer, Michigan called to report a car moving erratically. Callers said it looked like a six-year-old was driving. Police discovered a six-year-old was driving. He'd taken the keys off the counter at home and taught himself what to do. Asked what he thought he was doing, the boy explained that he was going out for Chinese food, of course.

Around the Nation
5:30 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Happy Birthday: Federal Income Tax Turns 100

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you weren't finished with your taxes, you may have been buried in paperwork over the weekend. Not true for last-minute filers a century ago. While this year's 1040 tax form has 214 pages of instructions, in 1913 it was just one page. There was a section for how farmers should claim livestock including animal wool and hides. There was a line for losses sustained in firestorm or shipwreck. But sorry, the family account at the country store was not deductible.

Business
2:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: The Cicada Index.

Every 17 years, these nasty, loud, little insects known as Brood 2 cicadas emerge in staggering numbers - as many as on billion per square mile from the Carolinas to Connecticut.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

They have a grinding song. They have an endless appetite for vegetation, and most people along the East Coast dread their arrival. But savvy investors know better.

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Asia
2:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Examining North Korea

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

North Korea is celebrating the birthday of its founder, Kim Il Sung. The North's leader has been dead nearly 20 years but is treated like a god. And of course, his son; now, his grandson; have both succeeded him. As part of this year's festivities, North Korea sponsored a marathon in the capital, Pyongyang, that drew athletes from around the world; an event that came even though the North has been threatening a nuclear strike against the United States.

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Europe
2:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Retaliating Against U.S., Russia Bars 18 Americans

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tensions have been increasing between the United States and Russia, and things unraveled even more over the weekend. Russia named 18 Americans who will be barred from entering Russia because of an alleged involvement in human rights violations. Here's NPR's Corey Flintoff.

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Shots - Health News
1:05 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer.
Samantha Murphy for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:45 am

Most research on memory loss in the elderly focuses on dementia, Alzheimer's disease or other brain diseases.

But neuroscientist Emily Rogalski from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine knew there is great variation in how good memory is in older people. Most have memory loss to varying degrees, but some have strong memories, even well into old age.

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Shots - Health News
1:04 am
Mon April 15, 2013

How Exercise And Other Activities Beat Back Dementia

An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:45 am

The numbers are pretty grim: More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia.

But here's the good news: Brain researchers say there are ways to boost brain power and stave off problems in memory and thinking.

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Author Interviews
1:03 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Friedkin, Who Pushed Film Forward, Looks Back

HarperCollins Publishers

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 11:08 am

As a kid in Chicago, director William Friedkin liked to frighten little girls with scary stories. When he grew up, he scared the rest of us with a little girl — Regan MacNeil, who is possessed by the devil in his horror classic The Exorcist.

And in The French Connection, he put knots in our stomachs with one of the great movie chases in American cinema.

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Shots - Health News
1:01 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Supreme Court Asks: Can Human Genes Be Patented?

Artist's representation of DNA.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 6:45 am

Same-sex marriage got huge headlines at the Supreme Court last month, but in the world of science and medicine, the case being argued on Monday is far more important. The lawsuit deals with a truly 21st century issue — whether human genes may be patented.

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Around the Nation
12:25 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Tax Day Is This Statue Of Liberty's Last Day Of Work

Robert Oliver, 27, dances on the corner of 28th and Crenshaw in west Los Angeles, dressed in a Statue of Liberty costume outside the offices of Liberty Income Tax.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

The intersection of Crenshaw Boulevard and 28th Street looks like a lot of intersections in Los Angeles: There's a Taco Bell on one corner and a strip mall with a liquor store and a Liberty Tax Service office on the other. And out in front, as traffic speeds by, 27-year-old Robert Oliver is hard at work — dancing.

"So, chest movements like this, this is called bucking," he says. His chest bounces to the beat. His Bluetooth headphones are on. And his feet glide across the hot sidewalk like he's on ice. "I come up in here and I go down, and that's called a kill-off."

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Monkey See
12:16 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Big Hair, Big Shoulders And Big Money: Linda Evans On '80s Excess

Joan Collins, John Forsythe and Linda Evans at a party celebrating the production of 150 episodes of Dynasty in 1986.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:34 am

You may find a hint to the era in which you were born (as well as your taste in entertainment) in Linda Wertheimer's clarification that on the '80s nighttime soap Dynasty, actress Linda Evans played Krystle Carrington — Krystle with a K, that is. (And, she does not add, an L-E.) If that surprises you at all, you were almost surely not paying attention to the television of the 1980s, when Evans, John Forsythe and Joan Collins made up the wealthiest, nuttiest, most notorious and most rhinestone-covered love triangle ever bedazzled for prime time: Krystle, Blake and Alexis.

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It's All Politics
7:44 pm
Sun April 14, 2013

Labor Nominee's Civil Rights Work Draws Praise, Controversy

Tom Perez, President Obama's nominee to lead the Labor Department, has been an aggressive advocate for civil rights.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

President Obama's nominee to lead the Labor Department has been one of the most aggressive advocates for civil rights in decades. Tom Perez prosecuted a record number of hate crimes cases and extracted huge settlements from banks that overcharged minorities for home loans.

But some Republican lawmakers say those same qualities give them pause about voting to confirm Perez as a Cabinet member.

'Making A Huge Difference'

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Heavy Rotation
6:31 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Phosphorescent
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:28 am

Each month, we ask public radio DJs from across the country to share their favorite new songs. Usually, we stick to a handful, but since April is Public Radio Music Month, we're celebrating with a 10-spot.

  • Larry Groce, host of NPR's Mountain Stage, which is produced by West Virginia Public Broadcasting
  • Rita Houston, the program director at WFUV in New York City
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NPR Story
8:55 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Consumers Cut Back, Sales Reports Show

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with less shopping.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Middle East
6:07 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Police In Dubai Adds Lamborghini To The Force

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Conspicuous consumption is the art of buying lots of expensive stuff to show off. It is part of daily life in the Emirate city of Dubai, even for the police. They just added a slick green and white Lamborghini with a $400,000 price tag to their force. It goes more than 200 miles per hour, which is useful in the fast moving kingdom.

Police say about 15 percent of the speeding tickets go to motorists going more than 130 miles per hour. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
5:25 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Japanese Blogger Obsesses Over Vending Machine

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

For most of us, the office vending machine is good for a mid-day pick-me-up; that's pretty much it. But for one Japanese man it is much more. He hosts a blog called "I Take a Picture of the Vending Machine Every Day or So, I'm Very Sorry." Since 2005 he's taken nearly daily pictures of the same vending machine. Over the years the sodas move, the ads change, and there was that true moment of drama - the machine started taking digital payments.

Latin America
3:49 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Venezuela's Telenovelas

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 8:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hugo Chavez, the late president of Venezuela, had a touch for the dramatic. He appeared on television all the time. It turns out, he also admired dramatic acting. In the 1990s, when he was in prison for an attempted coup, he never missed an episode of his favorite TV drama.

Once he gained power, a deeper drama developed. Venezuela was a huge exporter of Latin-American multi-episode dramas called telenovelas, until President Chavez's government changed that. NPR's Jasmine Garsd reports.

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