Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5am to 9am

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite you to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a522e1c8e336c082c3b6|5182a519e1c8e336c082c388

Pages

Middle East
2:38 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Experts Debate How Best To Remove Syria's Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's go deeper now into one issue Secretary of State John Kerry raised in my interview with him earlier in the program. The secretary, along with his Russian counterpart, got Syria's Bashar al-Assad to agree to hand over his vast store of chemical weapons. Now, Kerry is suggesting those stockpiles be taken out of Syria.

Read more
Movie Interviews
1:25 am
Thu October 17, 2013

'12 Years A Slave': 160 Years Later, A Memoir Becomes A Movie

Lupita Nyong'o and Chiwetel Ejiofor play Patsey and Solomon, two slaves on a Louisiana plantation, in 12 Years a Slave.
Francois Duhamel Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:09 am

Solomon Northup was born free in early-19th-century upstate New York. He lived the life of a respected and elegant musician until 1841, when he was lured South by the promise of a lucrative stint playing his fiddle in a traveling circus.

In Washington, D.C. — in the shadow of the Capitol — Northup was drugged. When he came to, he was in chains: a slave headed for the hellish world of plantation life. Only the hope of being reunited with his beloved wife and children kept him going.

Read more
Technology
1:06 am
Thu October 17, 2013

If A Tech Company Had Built The Federal Health Care Website

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 3:25 pm

HealthCare.gov was meant to create a simple, easy way for millions of Americans to shop for subsidized health care.

Instead, in a little two more than weeks, it has become the poster child for the federal government's technical ineptitude.

Read more
The State Of The American Small Business
1:05 am
Thu October 17, 2013

The Roots Of Franchising Took Hold In A Hair Salon Chain

Gary Robins sits in the chair of his Supercuts salon in Media, Pa., one of 41 he owns throughout Philadelphia and Delaware.
Will Figg for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

We have been reporting for several weeks now on small businesses in America. Today, we explore a business system where entrepreneurs and corporations come together: franchising. Franchising is a bit like marriage. It takes a good long-term relationship to succeed.

Read more
The Record
1:04 am
Thu October 17, 2013

The Year Onyx's 'Slam' Crashed Pop Radio

Onyx in an undated photo. From left to right, Sticky Fingaz, Fredro Starr, Suave and Big DS.
Al Pereira Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 8:23 am

Read more
Politics
10:13 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Senate Expected To Announce Deal To Raise Debt Limit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Hours before a deadline to extend the federal debt limit, the stock market seems kind of comfortable. The Dow Jones Industrials are actually up this morning, amid some hope that Congress may agree on a measure to avoid default and also reopen the federal government.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:21 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Snorkeler Shocked To See 18-Foot Oarfish

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Believers in sea monsters have some fresh evidence. A rarely seen fish has been pulled from the ocean off California's Catalina Island. A marine science instructor was snorkeling when she spotted it lying dead beneath the water, 18 feet long, a wide pug faced oarfish that can grow much, much bigger. It looks a lot like a mythical sea serpent and it took 15 people to pull the fish from the sea. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:16 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Boston Police Officer Adds His Name To American Lexicon

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 5:25 am

Maybe you've seen Steve Horgan, the cop on duty as the Red Sox played the Tigers in the league championship series. Boston's David Ortiz hit a home run. Video caught Officer Horgan, arms in the air, celebrating even as Detroit's Torii Hunter flipped over the wall in a vain effort to catch the ball and tumbled near the officer's feet. In Boston, that triumphant pose is now called Horganing.

Politics
3:58 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Debt Ceiling Deal Depends On U.S. Senate

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 6:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. The prospects for a deal to avoid default and reopen the government now depend on the U.S. Senate, whose members include Saxby Chambliss, Republican of Georgia, who's on the line. Senator, welcome back to the program.

SENATOR SAXBY CHAMBLISS: Good to be with you, Steve.

Read more
Middle East
3:58 am
Wed October 16, 2013

A Graduate Student's Odyssey From Gaza To Indianapolis

Palestinian travelers wait to cross into Egypt at the Rafah crossing terminal in the southern Gaza Strip earlier this month.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:30 am

To get a small sense of Fida'a Abuassi's odyssey, start on June 28, days before the Egyptian coup. She had just returned to her native Gaza Strip via Cairo after spending the year in New York on the U.S. government-sponsored Fulbright student program.

"I came back to Gaza, and then they declared that they will close the border until further notice," she says.

Her goal was to get to Indiana by August to start her master's program at the University of Indianapolis.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:27 am
Wed October 16, 2013

After Sept. 11, Special Ops Were 'Injected With Steroids'

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This time last week an alleged terrorist known as Abu Anas al Libi was on a Navy ship being interrogated after being snatched from his home in Libya by U.S. Special Forces. Yesterday, al Libi was arraigned in a federal court in New York accused in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in East Africa that left 224 dead.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
3:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

We Say Goodbye To Detective Munch, Umpire Wally Bell

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And now for a little "Law and Order." It's the popular franchise with many spinoffs that once seemed in danger of taking over the entire television spectrum.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Each episode begins in the criminal justice system and goes on to feature shocking crimes solved by wise-cracking, hard-boiled cops.

Read more
Research News
2:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Why College Freshmen May Feel Like Impostors On Campus

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 9:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Tens of thousands of freshman have just finished their first month in college. They've signed up for classes, met a bunch of other people and, if history is any guide, asked themselves a question: What am I doing here? Everyone else is smarter and better adjusted than I am. And for some, that question totally changes the college experience, may even cause them to drop out, which is why a researcher was determined to intervene. He told his story to NPR's Shankar Vedantam, who's here to tell it to us. Hi, Shankar.

Read more
Business
2:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Banks Ease Purse Strings On Luxury Home Loans

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And for the first time in decades, interest rates for loans on jumbo homes are lower than rates for a typical mortgage. And because of that, the luxury market is the fastest growing home loans sector.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Peter O'Dowd reports.

Read more
National Security
2:11 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Has Elite Interrogation Group Lived Up To Expectations?

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
12:59 am
Wed October 16, 2013

You Asked For It: Frank Deford's Top 12 List

Frank Deford to football players: Get more creative when you win, please.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:35 am

As a commentator, Frank Deford gets a lot of suggestions about prominent subjects that he should take to task. Usually, he has already sounded off on these suggested topics, and most of them are cut and dried, with nothing new to add. But here, Deford takes on 12 of these familiar issues — this time with brief updates.

Read more
The Salt
12:58 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Arkansas Aims To Make Edamame As American As Apple Pie

An Arkansas company is trying to cash in on an edamame boom in the U.S.
Will Merydith Flickr

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 12:31 pm

Irene Adams cooks supper for husband, Luke, and 2-year-old son, Cole, at their home in Fayetteville, Ark. She used to serve lots of green beans, but switched to edamame after tasting it at a local restaurant.

"[Cole] used to split his green beans and take out the little seeds inside," Adams says. "So I told Luke we should try edamame, because it's bigger seeds and has more flavor, so that's why we decided to try it and he loves it."

Read more
Environment
12:57 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Fuel In The Fire: Burn Wood For Power Or Leave It To Nature

At more than 400 square miles, the Rim Fire is the largest Sierra Nevada fire in recorded history.
Mike McMillan US Forest Service

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:59 am

The record-breaking wildfire in Yosemite National Park is almost fully contained, two months after it started. The blaze calls attention to a problem across the western U.S.: After a century of having its fires routinely extinguished, the forests are overloaded with fuel.

A heated debate has flared up about what to do with that forest fuel. California is hoping to reduce its fire risk through renewable energy, but some worry about the environmental costs of thinning the forests.

'It Was Torched'

Read more
The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Fitch Places U.S. Under Review For A Credit Downgrade

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:58 am

Fitch Ratings, one of the big three credit ratings agencies, issued a warning shot today, saying that while it affirmed the United States' AAA credit rating, it was placing it on "rating watch negative."

In other words, it was placing the country's long-term credit rating under review for a potential downgrade.

Read more
Politics
10:48 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Support Unclear For GOP's Plan To End Shutdown

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:12 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with the latest on the deadlock here in Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: We've been following the story all this hour: House Republicans have been expected to announce their own plan to end the partial government shutdown and avert a default on the national debt. But House Speaker John Boehner came to the microphones a short while ago and kept things very vague.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Read more
Politics
9:03 am
Tue October 15, 2013

House GOP To Propose Plan To Reopen Government

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:12 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Read more
The Salt
8:38 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Farm Families Pick Massive Corn Harvest As Prices Shrink

Curt Friesen is a fourth-generation farmer in central Nebraska.
Grant Gerlock for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:39 pm

Corn prices are down and the farm bill is stalled in Congress. So there's a lot of uncertainly in the air as harvest season gets into full swing across the Midwest. But this is a time of year when farm families like the Friesens in Henderson, Neb., come together to focus on the big task at hand: the corn harvest.

Everyone in the family has a job to do.

"Like my dad — he drives auger wagon," Curt Friesen says. "He drives auger wagon only. That's all he's done since 1976, I think. ... My wife, Nancy, she drives the combine; that's her job."

Read more
Around the Nation
5:54 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Pa. Caterpillars Predict Wet, Cold Winter

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:41 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Albuquerque Trolley Will Take You Past Walter White's Home

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:12 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

California's Universal Studios has a tour where you see the sets of old movies and TV shows. So does Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ABQ Trolley Company has been taking people on tours of sites seen in the show "Breaking Bad." You roll past the home of main character Walter White, or see the carwash where he made extra money before starting to cook meth. The company is lengthening its tour season. Spoiler Alert: The series has ended.

Ecstatic Voices
4:15 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Before Churches Had Songbooks, There Was 'Lined-Out' Gospel

Church elder Elwood Cornett preaches at a recent reunion of Old Regular Baptists. Brother Don Pratt is seated behind him in a blue shirt and tie.
Cindy Johnston NPR

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:12 am

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Ethnic Divisions In Russia Grow Sharper

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 3:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Harvest Brings Farm Families Together, Redefines Commitment

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 3:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, here's a reality about farming. From the earliest days of this country, it's been an uncertain business, and for many decades, national policies have been designed to smooth out that risk. But, of course, the risk never entirely goes away. You can never control the rain, for example, and lately the uncertainty has been growing. Corn prices are down. The farm bill is stalled in Congress and there's a sense that good times may be fading.

From Nebraska, Grant Gerlock of NET News brings us his report.

Read more
NPR Story
2:38 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Government Shutdown Delays Start Of Crab Season

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 3:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Crabbing season starts today in Alaska, well, except it doesn't. Crabbers and their boats are stuck in port because they can't get the permits that they need to begin their work. Federal workers who issue those permits are off the job because of the partial government shutdown and this is cutting into the short three month Alaska crab season, which is worth upwards of $200 million for the crabbers alone.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:51 am
Tue October 15, 2013

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

Three generations live under this roof: (from left) 19-year-old Jamie Dusseault, grandmother Jacque Ruggles, mother Marci Dusseault and 22-year-old Chelsie Dusseault.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 8:12 am

New homes are back in a big way — literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Take Jacque Ruggles' family, for example. Four women from three generations live under one roof.

"I'm the matriarch," Ruggles says. "I'm grandma."

Read more
Education
12:49 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

Palo Alto middle school student Jennifer Munoz Tello (right) stands outside her family's trailer in Palo Alto with her mother, Sandra, and 2-year-old sister, Cynthia.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:37 am

Sunny Palo Alto, Calif., is awash in multimillion-dollar homes, luxury Tesla electric cars and other financial fruits from a digital revolution the city helped spark. The Silicon Valley city is home to Stanford University, at least eight billionaires, and one mobile home park.

Read more

Pages