Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun July 13, 2014

A Puzzle With Ch-Ch-Changes

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 9:47 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes." Every answer is a word starting with the letters "ch," and your clue will be an anagram of the word.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has five letters. Move the middle letter to the end to name another famous actress of the past. Who are these actresses?

Answer: Greta Garbo/Eva or Zsa Zsa Gabor

Winner: Craig Moreland from Okemos, Mich.

Next week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Ben Kaufman of Portland, Ore. Think of a popular TV show about cooking. I guarantee it's a show everyone has heard of. Remove the second and third letters of the first word and insert them after the first letter of the second word. You'll get a phrase for a different kind of cooking. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Arun Rath. In a world where anagrams and acronyms lurk in dark corners, and the only defenses are wit and words, one listener must go forth and puzzle. Joining me now is Will Shortz. He is of course the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzle master. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Morning, Arun.

RATH: So last week you challenged us to a Hollywood inspired puzzle, which was nice for me since I live in Los Angeles. Can you remind us what the challenge was?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said, name a famous actress of the past whose last name has five letters. Move the middle letter to the end to name another famous actress of the past. I asked, who are these actresses? Well, the first was Greta Garbo, G-A-R-B-O. Move the R and you get Gabor, as in Eva or Zsa Zsa.

RATH: Nice. We got about 1,900 correct answers this week. And our randomly selected winner is Craig Moreland from Okemos, Michigan. He joins us on the line now. Congratulations, Craig.

CRAIG MORELAND: Thank you very much.

RATH: So Craig how did you figure this one out?

MORELAND: You know, this is one of those ones that just really came to me without thinking about it very much. I don't know why. You know, sometimes that happens. I don't know why. I was out walking the dog, and I thought of Greta Garbo and - hey, that works. I was thinking of Eva more than Zsa Zsa, but I got it.

RATH: Nice. Well, lucky you. How long have you been playing the puzzle?

MORELAND: Since Mr. Shortz was at Games magazine. So like...

RATH: Woah.

MORELAND: Well over 20 years I think.

RATH: Nice. So that must make the victory especially sweet.

MORELAND: Yeah, especially when I hear people that have been on more than once or, you know, win with their first entry, so.

RATH: And Craig, what you do for a living?

MORELAND: I am a news photographer at a TV station in Detroit.

RATH: Excellent. That sounds like an exciting job.

MORELAND: It can be. It can be.

RATH: So Craig, are you ready to play the puzzle?

MORELAND: I am ready.

RATH: OK, let's play.

SHORTZ: All right, Craig and Arun. Today's puzzle is called ch-ch-ch-changes. Every answer is a word starting with the letters C-H, which I'd like you to get from its anagram. For example, if I said C-H plus tale - T-A-L-E, you should say chale. So it always starts with C-H. Your first one is C-H plus cane, C-A-N-E.

MORELAND: C-H-C-A-N-E.

RATH: Think I got this.

MORELAND: Oh, OK go ahead, Arun.

RATH: Is it chance?

SHORTZ: Chance is it, good. All right. Number two is C-H plus lies, L-I-E-S. Think of a tool.

MORELAND: A chisel.

SHORTZ: Chisel is it. C-H plus sour, S-O-U-R.

MORELAND: Chorus.

RATH: Good one.

SHORTZ: Chorus is it. C-H plus nose, N-O-S-E.

MORELAND: Chosen.

SHORTZ: Excellent. C-H plus more, M-O-R-E.

MORELAND: Arun?

RATH: I'm... (Laughing).

SHORTZ: That ball's thrown into your court. This is a little tricky 'cause it does not - the next letter is not a vowel. It's one of the consonants.

MORELAND: Chrome.

SHORTZ: Chrome is it. C-H plus plea, P-L-E-A.

MORELAND: Chapel.

RATH: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Plus rube, R-U-B-E.

MORELAND: Cherub.

SHORTZ: Plus eyes, E-Y-E-S.

MORELAND: Cheesy.

SHORTZ: Cheesy is it.

RATH: I'm not cheesy. Oh, that's your answer. Sorry.

MORELAND: No, no.

SHORTZ: Plus grain, G-R-A-I-N.

MORELAND: Is that chagrin?

SHORTZ: Excellent.

RATH: Nice.

SHORTZ: Plus times, T-I-M-E-S.

MORELAND: Chemist?

SHORTZ: Oh, yeah.

RATH: Wow.

SHORTZ: Plus dread, D-R-E-A-D.

MORELAND: D-R-E-A-D. Is it cheddar?

SHORTZ: Cheddar is it. Plus rowed, R-O-W-E-D.

MORELAND: Is it chowder?

SHORTZ: Plus ratio, R-A-T-I-O.

RATH: Ah, mode of transport?

SHORTZ: Yes.

MORELAND: A chariot.

SHORTZ: That's it. Nice clue, too. Plus prate, P-R-A-T-E.

MORELAND: Is that chapter?

SHORTZ: Plus marina, M-A-R-I-N-A.

MORELAND: I'm drawing a blank on this one.

SHORTZ: And it's a hint - it's something a meeting would have. Maybe.

MORELAND: Oh, a chairman.

SHORTZ: A chairman is it. And your last one is refuel, C-H plus R-E-F-U-E-L.

MORELAND: Is that cheerful?

SHORTZ: Cheerful.

RATH: Wow.

SHORTZ: Bravo. I am impressed.

RATH: Nicely done, Craig. Sorry I wasn't more help.

MORELAND: You were there when I needed you, Arun.

(LAUGHTER)

RATH: Good. So if you're playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Craig, tell us your local public radio station.

MORELAND: When I am driving around at work, I listen to WUOM in Ann Arbor and WDET in Detroit. And when I am home, we're members and day sponsors and volunteers at WKAR in East Lansing.

RATH: Nice. Craig Moreland of Okemos, Michigan. Thanks for playing the puzzle.

MORELAND: Thank you very much. It was a lot of fun.

RATH: OK Will, what's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Ben Kaufman of Portland, Oregon. Think of a popular TV show about cooking. And I guarantee it's a show everyone's heard of. Remove the second and third letters of the first word, and insert them after the first letter of the second word, and you'll get a phrase for a different kind of cooking. What is it? So again, a popular TV show about cooking. I guarantee you know it. Remove the second and third letters of the first word, and insert them after the first letter of the second word. You'll get a phrase for a different kind of cooking. What phrase is it?

RATH: OK. When you have the answer go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, July 17 at 3:00 p.m. Eastern. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank, Arun. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.