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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Beijing is calling the presence of an American destroyer near a sensitive archipelago in the South China Sea "a serious political and military provocation."

The statement about the USS Stethem, a guided-missile destroyer that was steaming near Triton Island in the Paracels, an island chain claimed by China, came hours before President Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping spoke by phone about "negative factors" affecting relations between the two countries.

Four Arab nations in a diplomatic showdown with Qatar agreed on Monday to extend a deadline for the Gulf state to meet a series of demands, including the shutting down of the Al-Jazeera news network.

Saudi Arabia and its allies – Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain – have issued a list of 13 demands, which also includes curbing ties with Iran and the closing of a Turkish base in Qatar. Qatar has called the demands an "affront to international law."

On the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China after more than 150 years of British rule, Chinese leader Xi Jinping has warned residents of the territory not to cross a "red line" by challenging Beijing's authority.

It was the first visit by Xi to Hong Kong since he became the leader of China in 2013. He spoke at a swearing-in ceremony for Carrie Lam, who becomes the new "chief executive" of the territory.

The man who was the main organizer of the failed Fyre Festival in the Bahamas earlier this year has been arrested by authorities and charged with wire fraud for allegedly bilking investors in his company, Fyre Media, which promoted the event.

Billy McFarland was arrested by federal agents at his Manhattan home on Friday.

The New York Times writes:

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

New Jersey, Maine and Illinois are all facing at least partial government shutdowns after their legislatures failed to pass budgets. Washington and Alaska managed eleventh-hour deals to avoid a similar fate. Connecticut failed to pass a budget, but the state's governor stepped in with an emergency spending order.

The new fiscal year for these and 40 other states begins today.

New Jersey

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

A shooting in a Little Rock, Ark., nightclub has left at least 28 people injured, according to local police, who said they did not believe it was a terrorist-related attack.

Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner told KTHV that the shooting, which occurred around 2:30 a.m. Saturday at the Power Ultra Lounge, appears to have been the result of a "dispute [that] broke out between people inside."

Updated at 4:02 p.m. ET on Aug. 30: The Northern Cheyenne tribe, Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity and National Parks Conservation Association have filed their lawsuit against the secretary of the interior and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, among others. Read their full complaint here.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

A gunman opened fire at a New York City area hospital on Friday, killing one person and injuring six others before killing himself, according New York Police Commissioner James O'Neill.

In a brief news conference, O'Neill said the shooter was a former employee of the hospital but did not identify him. A law enforcement source tells NPR that the man was Dr. Henry Bello.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said the attack apparently stemmed from a workplace-related matter but didn't elaborate.

Marine Le Pen, the leader of France's far-right National Front party, has been placed under formal investigation for allegedly misusing European Parliament funds for party work. Le Pen has denied any wrongdoing.

According to The Guardian, "Under French law, being put under formal investigation means there is 'serious or consistent evidence' that points to probable involvement in a crime."

The newspaper adds:

The last British governor of Hong Kong, who helped negotiate its return to China 20 years ago, is decrying Beijing's administration of the territory on the anniversary of the historic handover.

When describing the cultural history of the Caribbean island of Grenada, it's the cooking pot rather than the melting pot that springs to mind. And there's no better culinary metaphor than "oil down," the peculiarly named national dish of Grenada, a mix of meats and vegetables.

Nearly every ingredient in this hearty stew has a unique origin and story to tell: For instance, callaloo, a leafy vegetable somewhat similar in taste to spinach, and the same plant's root, known as dasheen, are indigenous to the Caribbean and were cultivated by Grenada's earliest Amerindian inhabitants.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

NATO in Afghanistan says it will lead an investigation into an airstrike in Kunduz this weekend that hit a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital, killing 22 people — an attack that the humanitarian organization, also known as Doctors Without Borders, has called "a war crime."

A U.S.-led airstrike on the northern Afghan city was carried out Saturday, but the circumstances surrounding it remain murky. NATO acknowledges only that the raid occurred near the charity's hospital.

Utah GOP Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he wants to challenge Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy for the post of House speaker, saying he's a better communicator and has more credibility with the party's conservative base.

"I am running for Speaker of the House of Representatives because I want to lead the way on tackling the toughest issues facing the United States of America," Chaffetz said in a statement released today.

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

The Coast Guard says it has located several objects floating in the water near the spot in the Bahamas where a 790-foot cargo ship and its crew of 33 went missing last week after issuing a distress satellite notification amid hurricane-force winds and waves.

U.S. Coast Guard pilots searching for a third day for the El Faro — a roll-on, roll-off container ship — found life jackets, containers and an oil slick on the water.

Updated at 1:10 a.m. ET Monday:

A powerful rainstorm continues to soak South Carolina. At least five deaths have been reported across the state. Several sections of interstate highways have been closed including a 70-mile portion of I-95. In the state's capital Columbia, rescue operations will continue through at least Monday. Many schools and universities have canceled Monday classes and some businesses will also be closed. Forecasters predict it could be Tuesday before the rain stops.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The sheriff in Roseburg, Oregon, where a gunman killed 9 students at Umpqua Community College earlier this week, said that the shooter killed himself during a confrontation with police at the scene of the campus assault.

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin, speaking at what he said would be the final scheduled new conference on the Thursday shooting, said that the Oregon medical examiner has identified the cause of death of the shooter as suicide.

Monsignor Krzysztof Charamsa, a 43-year-old Polish priest who revealed his homosexuality, and a same-sex relationship on the eve of gathering of bishops from around the world, has been stripped of his doctrinal responsibilities for what the Vatican says are "very serious and irresponsible" actions.

"The decision to make such a pointed statement on the eve of the opening of the synod appears very serious and irresponsible, since it aims to subject the synod assembly to undue media pressure," the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said in a statement.

Authorities are trying to build a profile of the 26-year-old gunman who shot and killed 9 people and wounded as many at a western Oregon community college on Thursday in hopes of discovering what his motive might have been.

The Douglas County Sheriff, John Hanlin, has refused to say the shooter's name, stating that he doesn't want to "glorify" him, but officials have said he is Christopher Sean Harper-Mercer and that he was killed at the scene in a shoot-out with police.

Here's what we know about him:

Updated at 9:03 p.m. ET

Hurricane Joaquin is moving rapidly away from the Bahamas as a Category 4 storm, with sustained winds of 155 mph. Although forecasters say it will stay well offshore from the U.S. East Coast, Bermuda could be in the storm's crosshairs.

Even without a direct hit on the Eastern Seaboard, severe flooding, partly from hurricane-generated rain, was is a big concern in the Carolinas. The White House has declared a state of emergency in South Carolina, which is getting historic levels of rainfall.

The Coast Guard was searching for a 735-foot cargo ship with 33 crew aboard after an emergency satellite message was received from the vessel saying it was caught in the path of Hurricane Joaquin.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

A powerful Hurricane Joaquin was pummeling the Bahamas as it stayed put over the islands with sustained winds of 130 mph.

The storm is expected to begin a gradual march north, but most forecast models now place it firmly on a trajectory that stays well offshore from the U.S. East Coast, alleviating some concern over its potential impact.

It was a routine launch for the Atlas V booster, which was carrying a Mexican satellite into orbit as it lifted off from Florida's Cape Canaveral on Friday morning. But the rocket's expanding exhaust plume was anything but ordinary.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The U.S. economy added just 142,000 jobs in September, falling short of what most economists had forecast. The unemployment rate remained at 5.1 percent, according to a separate survey. The two reports were released by the Department of Labor.

Updated at 10:50 p.m. ET

After a shooting at a community college in western Oregon, 10 people are dead and seven others are wounded, according to the Douglas County sheriff. Officials would not say whether the shooter, who was killed by police in an exchange of gunfire on campus, was included in the 10 fatalities.

In a evening news conference, Sheriff John Hanlin said that investigators believe they know the name of the attacker, and it will be released by the medical examiner.

Today is the day — the beginning of the end for the venerable (but woefully open to abuse) magnetic stripe, a technology pioneered in the 1960s. Enter the more secure age of the chip, or "EMV" cards.

At least in theory.

It's actually a bit more complicated. Here are three things to know:

Is today (Oct. 1) the deadline for the switch from magnetic-stripe cards to the chipped cards?

Updated, 1:20 a.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center's projections for Hurricane Joaquin in the past two days have incrementally moved the storm east. Now the government agency is saying the storm is likely to miss the United States altogether.

Some coastal flooding is still likely from the storm's surge, the hurricane center says, and unrelated rains could cause flooding in parts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

Updated at 8:50 a.m. ET on Sept. 28

Pope Francis has bid the United States farewell. His plane departed for Rome on Sunday night, thus bringing to a close his first visit to U.S. soil.

"My days with you have been brief, but they have been days of great grace for me. And I pray for you, too," the pontiff said, in a brief ceremony at the Philadelphia International Airport before his flight's departure. "As I prepare to leave, I do so with a heart full of gratitude and hope."

President Obama and Cuba's President Raul Castro will meet on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, a White House official says.

The leaders met face-to-face in April in Panama for the first time. This would be their second such meeting, an official told reporters aboard Air Force One.

The Associated Press reports:

Iraq says it has reached a deal to share intelligence with Russia and Iran as part of an effort to defeat the Islamic State group, which controls large parts of the region.

French warplanes also carried out their first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria, hitting targets identified during reconnaissance missions over the past two weeks, according to the BBC.

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani tells NPR that much like in the United States, there are in his country "two differing viewpoints" on the six-party nuclear deal — one that is cautiously optimistic of success and another that is highly skeptical of Washington's desire to live up to its end of the bargain.

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