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Mara Liasson

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered six presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

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On Tuesday night, President Obama will give his final State of the Union address. It's the last big speech many Americans will watch him deliver, and he wants to leave a good impression.

Here are five things to watch for.

1. How different will this speech be from his past State of the Union addresses?

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At a Manchester, N.H., watch party following Saturday's Democratic primary debate, Hillary Clinton stood side by side with the man she called her "not so secret weapon" — her husband, former President Bill Clinton. Voters are about to see much more of him, she said.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Editor's Note: Some readers might find some of the language below offensive.

This post was updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Donald Trump has made his most outrageous statement yet in a string of beyond-the-pale utterances.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Sometimes being in the White House briefing has a "down the rabbit hole" quality to it.

Today I inadvertently started Comb-overgate with an innocent question.

When spokesman Josh Earnest comes in to the briefing room, he often brings prepared remarks on questions he has anticipated.

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After this latest mass shooting, President Obama once again finds himself in the position of decrying this type of gun violence and not being able to do much about it. NPR's national political correspondent, Mara Liasson, reports.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

At every turn, this year's presidential campaign has proved conventional wisdom wrong. The aftermath of the Paris attacks might be another example.

As soon as the attacks were over, a chorus of (establishment) Republican voices predicted that the new focus on national security and terrorism would change the dynamic of the Republican race. This was the tipping point, they declared, that would finally usher out the outsiders leading the polls — Donald Trump and Ben Carson — in favor of more serious, experienced candidates.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's now within a year of Election Day 2016. The Republican race for the nomination is still completely unsettled, the Democratic race a little less. But hardly anything has worked out according to conventional wisdom.

With that caveat, here are five big things that (we think!) will help determine the outcome of next year's election.

1. Voter mood

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we'll hear more about the debate and the presidential race from NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson.

Hi Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi Robert.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It was easy to sense some movement in the presidential campaign last night. Some candidates are tired of being down in the race. Some of the leaders in the race can't be sure if they'll stay on top.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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The first Democratic presidential debate is set for Tuesday, even as Vice President Joe Biden is considering whether to join the White House race. NPR's Mara Liasson sets up the showdown, and explains how the field is preparing for Biden's decision days before the event.

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