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Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Historian Gerda Lerner, a pioneer in the creation of women's studies as an academic discipline, has died in Madison, Wisc. She was 92.

A prolific feminist author, Lerner wrote texts that traced the history of patriarchy going back thousands of years to more modern topics, such as African American women's history. Her many books included a two volume work called 'Women in History': the first book examined the history of patriarchy and the second dealt with the start of feminist consciousness.

There's media speculation that Kim Jong-un may have added another title to his roles as new North Korean leader and new husband - could he be a new father?

Notoriously secretive North Korea apparently released an image of Kim's stylish wife, Ri Sol-ju this week, attending a New Year's event. She's trim and glamorous in her purple suit, standing next to her saluting husband.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett (R), says the NCAA badly overreached itself when it imposed punitive financial sanctions on Penn State over the handling of sexual predator and former Penn State assistant football coach, Jerry Sandusky. Corbett is filing a federal anti-trust lawsuit against the collegiate athletic association, saying it ignored its own disciplinary rules in its rush to castigate the Pennsylvania university.

The wayward Kulluk oil drilling platform remains stuck onshore near Kodiak Island, Alaska.

The unmoored platform, owned by Shell Oil, was being towed in the Gulf of Alaska last week when it broke away from its tow lines, as Bill wrote. But seas were so treacherous the crews disconnected the tow lines for their safety. They were later airlifted off the platform. The rig fetched up against Sitkalidak Island, just south of Kodiak Island on New Year's Eve.

Clarification at 7:32 p.m. ET: Vaccination Campaign Not Suspended:

The U.N. has halted its participation in a Pakistani-run polio vaccination program following attacks on health care workers. Lack of U.N. support is a big setback, but the government said it would not end the campaign. Officials say the country is committed to seeing polio eradicated and has suspended vaccinations only in Sindh province, where Karachi is located.

Earlier we reported that the campaign was suspended; it is the U.N.'s participation that has been suspended.

In a dazzling Las Vegas pageant with a lot of glitter, sequins and a great deal of skin, Rhode Island college student Olivia Culpo bested 88 other international competitors to win the Miss Universe crown.

Good morning - here are our early stories:

Today's 'Plan B' Vote: Part Of Posturing Or A Push Over The 'Fiscal Cliff'?

And here are other early headlines:

Winter Storm Hits The Plains, While Tornado Warning For Alabama. (CNN)

(Note at 8:30 a.m. ET, Dec. 20: The storm is indeed dumping heavy snow across several states. More here.)

In a statement early this morning, the Treasury Department says it's going to "exit" its investment in General Motors. The federal government holds just over 500 million shares of GM stock.

The automaker will buy 200 million of those shares, and the government will dispose of the rest "in an orderly fashion" over the next year and a half, depending on market conditions.

The issue of gun control appears to have moved into business and finance. One of the largest private equity companies in the country is terminating its relationship with a firearms corporation associated with one of the weapons used in the Newtown school shooting.

When the 20-inch gas pipeline next to Interstate 77 in West Virginia first ruptured on Tuesday, nobody at pipeline operator, Columbia Gas Transmission, knew it.

Now, the National Transportation Safety Board is trying to find out why. NTSB member Robert Sumwalt says no warning went off in the operating company's control center in nearby Charleston, so investigators are going there to interview staffers and review data.

Pope Benedict XVI is officially a tweep. He launched his new Twitter account with this blessing:

West Virginia road crews are repairing Interstate Highway 77, about 15 miles north of Charleston after a tremendous explosion wrecked the road. No one was killed in the blast.

Update at 6:00 p.m. ET:

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has signed into law two controversial "right-to-work" bills passed earlier Tuesday by the state's House. This officially makes Michigan the 24th right-to-work state in the nation.

The two bills give both public and private employees so-called right-to-work protections — controversial pieces of legislation that have sparked protests in and around the state capitol in Lansing.

Good morning, here are our top stories:

Syrian Defector: Assad Will Use Chemical Weapons If He's Desperate.

And here are other early headlines:

Union Protesters Converge On Michigan Capitol Ahead Of Right-To-Work Vote. (Michigan Live)

The delightful Maccabeats of Yeshiva University kick off the first night of Hanukkah with their "Candlelight" - it's a great takeoff on Taio Cruz's Dynamite, but with menorahs, warriors in homemade costumes and latkes!

That fledgling Democrat within Charlie Crist, former Republican governor of Florida, has emerged at last:

This should be The Decision That Surprised No One, since Crist was a featured speaker at the Democratic National Convention last September and had been a registered independent before that.

As NPR's S.V. Date writes,

Some outraged protesters remain around the Egyptian presidential palace in Cairo today, as opponents of President Mohammed Morsi defy his recent ruling granting himself executive powers that can't be questioned by a court.

Now there's word he may have signed a new order allowing soldiers to detain and arrest civilians, a right that's reserved for police officers.

Former Florida neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman says NBC Universal's editorial decisions made him look like a racist when the network covered the shooting and killing of teenager Trayvon Martin.

Good Friday morning - here are our early stories:

Strong Earthquake Strikes Japan, Triggering Small Tsunami.

And here are more early headlines:

Skittish Investors Waiting For Latest Unemployment Rate News. (MarketWatch)