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Julie McCarthy

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's go next to Nepal, where United States Marines have arrived. They will help the recovery from an earthquake that left more than 7,000 people dead and far more than that homeless. Many say basic supplies are not reaching them. NPR's Julie McCarthy is covering this story from Kathmandu. She's been speaking with the commander of the newly arrived U.S. Marines. And Julie, what is their job? JULIE...

Blue-uniformed police do the heavy lifting in Dubar square in the city of Patan, one of Nepal's oldest. Moving wooden beams and stacking broken bricks, they sift through ruined monuments, some of which date back four centuries and more. Nepal is home to one of the world's largest collections of cultural heritage sites. A considerable chunk of the treasures crumpled under the intensity of the seismic energy released by the quake nine days ago. Dubar Square in Patan is just one of three squares...

He carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours. Then he traveled with her by bus for 12 more. She suffered a severe head injury when the earthquake rumbled through her village of Thumi. He was trying to get her to a hospital in the Gorkha district in northern-central Nepal. Like many residents of Nepal's remote villages, Amar Baramu could be forgiven for thinking that cries for help have gone unheard. As the relief operation enters its sixth day, aid workers are just beginning...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: We are also following news out of Nepal following Saturday's earthquake. People there have found little refuge from the powerful aftershocks, and many too frightened to stay indoors are sleeping under the stars. International aid groups have yet to reach remote mountain villages. They may find that many have been wiped off the map. From Kathmandu, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports there's anger rising in...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Over the weekend, I heard from a friend in Nepal. He described people spending their nights outdoors even if their homes survived Saturday's earthquake. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: People do not know what the powerful aftershocks will bring. Where buildings collapsed, people are digging loved ones out of the rubble. (SOUNDBITE OF CROWD YELLING) MONTAGNE: That's the chaotic moment when a man was pulled from...

The apparent suicide of a farmer at a rally in central Delhi has turned into a political mud-slinging contest. Gajendra Singh, reportedly in his 40s, was found hanging from a tree during a rally in New Delhi earlier this week. His death has quickly become a powerful symbol for disaffected and destitute farmers who oppose a government push to loosen restrictions on industrial acquisition of farmland. But Prime Minister Narendra Modi's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party says it smells a conspiracy...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: The U.S. has March Madness. India indulges in cricket, and today it was tough. The country lost a bid against Australia to defend the Cricket World Cup. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports the passion of Indian fans is something any national team would treasure. JUIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Across the country, Indians harnessed their hope, listening on car radios and sitting transfixed before television screens. ...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"I have no one. I've lost everything. My children are gone, my parents are gone. My husband's family doesn't ask about me. They don't even look for me, they don't even know if I eat," says Manu Ghosh, 85. That's her above, seen before and after the Hindu festival of Holi at her ashram in northern India. Manu was married at age 10 and found her way to the northern city of Vrindavan at 37. By that time, she was already widowed and had lost three children, who she says all died prematurely. Manu...

China's pollution is epic enough that even the mayor of Beijing said his city "is not livable" because of its noxious smog. But a new study, published Saturday in the Economic & Political Weekly , shows that 660 million people — half the population — live in areas where fine particulate matter pollution is above levels considered safe under Indian standards. If India curbs the pollution and meets its air quality standards, those 660 million people would add some...

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Rajendra K. Pachauri, stepped down Tuesday amid allegations of sexual misconduct that have engulfed the celebrated Indian economist and engineer. Pachauri is one of the world's top climate change officials. His departure from the IPCC is a huge embarrassment for the group, which was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize along with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore for their role in galvanizing international action against climate...

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi is noted for making bold statements — both in policy and fashion. When Modi sported a suit with pinstripes that spelled out his name in tiny gold lettering, his critics called it the height of vanity. But the controversial suit raised more than eyebrows: It sold at auction today for nearly $695,000. The "selfie" suit was debuted when Modi wore it to a bilateral meeting with President Obama during his visit to India last month. Modi's eye-catching wardrobe...

Imagine living in a world with little or no light when the sun set. That's the plight of an estimated 300 million Indians — a quarter of the population, mostly the rural poor. They're not left completely in the dark. Kerosene lamps provide light. Cow dung patties provide fuel for cooking. But these options take a toll on time and health. That's why India's prime minister is calling for global partnerships to bring green energy to the powerless millions. The village of Sadikpur is a good place...

Not even the most starry-eyed optimists of India's upstart Aam Aadmi [Common Man] Party dared predict they would pierce the armor of Prime Minister Narendra's Modi political invincibility as convincingly as they did today. The party won a 95 percent landslide, capturing 67 out of 70 seats in the local assembly election in Delhi to decide who will govern the Indian capital. The thrashing reduced Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party to just three seats. Political analyst Siddharth Varadarajan quipped...

The subject of religious intolerance is emerging as an irritant in U.S.-India relations. Senior Indian government officials pounced on remarks by President Barack Obama at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington on Thursday. Referencing India, he evoked religious discrimination. He said: "In past years, religious faiths of all types have, on occasion, been targeted by other peoples of faith, simply due to their heritage and their beliefs— acts that would have shocked Gandhi-ji," meaning...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi has taken to moonlighting as a radio host. He hosts his own show once a month. And for his latest episode he had a special guest - President Obama. The two leaders recorded the show Sunday during Obama's visit to India. And as NPR's Julie McCarthy reports, the broadcast aired across the nation today, and millions tuned in. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Modi set the ground...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: We're getting a glimpse of the opportunities and the friction in the relations of the world's two largest democracies. President Obama has finished his trip to India. Each country, the U.S. and India, is a huge market for the other. We will start, though, with the friction. President Obama finished his visit by urging Indians to safeguard the rights of women and of religious freedom. NPR's Julie...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pope Francis gave majority Buddhist Sri Lanka its first Catholic saint today during a seaside ceremony before thousands of people who packed the oceanfront of the capital, Colombo. Francis is in Asia on a six-day tour intended to build the Roman Catholic Church's following on a continent that holds 60 percent of the world's population but only 12 percent of Catholics. As church bells rang, the pope canonized Joseph Vaz, a priest who worked against the persecution of Catholics by the island's...

Heart surgery is a spectacle to behold. Even more so to see it on a mass scale, which is what happens at the Narayana Health, a state-of-the-art medical center in the southern Indian city of Bangalore. I am invited to scrub up and witness renowned surgeon Dr. Devi Shetty at work. The operating room is a symphony of all things medical: monitors beeping out a metronome-like rhythm, forceps and scissors clanging onto metal tables, a heart-lung machine gurgling as it does the work of the patient...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In India, the law has caught up with one of the country's most powerful political figures. A court has sentenced the popular J. Jayalalithaa, chief minister of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, to four years in prison and a record $1.5 million fine. Her crime: accumulating vast wealth for which the 66-year-old veteran politician could not account. It is India's highest-profile corruption case addressing illegally amassed wealth; the ruling has stunned an Indian political class that is widely...

Saying his country is prepared to resume peace talks with Pakistan, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi told the U.N. General Assembly Saturday that the discussion must take place "without the shadow of terrorism." Modi spoke at the U.N. one day after Pakistan's prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, criticized India's withdrawal from recent talks over the contested region of Kashmir in his speech to the assembly Friday. Today, Modi said it was up to Pakistan to create an "appropriate atmosphere" for...

India achieved a major scientific milestone this week by placing a space probe into orbit around Mars. But there is another fascination with the celestial bodies that is much older than India's space program. Astrology plays a role in the day-to-day lives of millions of Indians. And how does a leading Indian practitioner see this study of human destiny — as superstition or science? "Neither," says K.N. Rao, a retiree who served as director general of India's vast Comptroller and Auditor...

Anticipation is building in India over its rendezvous with Mars. NASA erupted into cheers after confirmation Sunday night that its space probe MAVEN injected into the Martian orbit. NASA's success came two days ahead of a critical engine burn designed to place an Indian spacecraft around the Red Planet, in a project dubbed MOM, Mars Orbiter Mission. Sleepless scientists conferring at the Space Center in Bangalore passed a crucial dry run Monday: a four-second fire-up of a Mars Orbiter engine...

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said al-Qaida will fail to attract recruits among his country's Muslims. Earlier this month, al-Qaida said it had created a new branch to bring Islamic rule to the entire Indian subcontinent. Modi's remarks, his first in an interview to international media since his election in May, are his most forthcoming on the Islamist group and India's Muslims, many of whom doubted his commitment to religious minorities in Hindu-dominant, but officially secular,...

Deepika Padukone, 28, is one of the biggest stars in Bollywood, and her many fans came rushing to her support after she slammed the country's leading newspaper, The Times Of India, over comments and a photo on its website about her cleavage. The ensuing storm on social media has revealed how many women are no longer accepting entrenched sexist attitudes in India. Padukone has starred in such blockbusters as last year's Chennai Express and the just-released Finding Fanny ....

After a year of silence, al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri has exhorted his "Muslim brothers" to join a newly established South Asia faction that would "defend the vulnerable in the Indian subcontinent." He listed Burma and Bangladesh, and specifically named three states in India — Assam, Gujarat and Kashmir. In disputed Kashmir, India's only Muslim-majority state — which is claimed by both Pakistan and India — an insurgency agitates for independence. Assam has its own separatist movement and...

A new film projects a decidedly different perspective about one of the most convulsive episodes in India's modern age. Kaum De Heere , or Diamonds of the Community , looks at the 1984 assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi — through the lens of her assassins. Producer Satish Katyal rejects the criticism that the film eulogizes Gandhi's killers. "It has a human angle," he says. "It's about their personal lives. Why did they suddenly commit this act?" Gandi's assassins,...

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