Julie McCarthy

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as an international correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. McCarthy is currently NPR's correspondent based in New Delhi, India.

In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan. Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

U.S. Spying Allegations Chafe An Already Angry India

U.S. Sen. John McCain leaves a meeting with India's foreign minister Wednesday in New Delhi.
Manish Swarup AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:24 pm

Aiming for a fresh start in troubled U.S.-India relations, U.S. Sen. John McCain met with newly elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi today in New Delhi. But McCain's two-day visit was overshadowed by reports that the U.S. National Security Agency was granted permission in 2010 to spy on Modi's political party.

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Parallels
12:23 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

In Blogs And Tweets, India's New Leader Bemoans Lack Of 'Honeymoon'

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi waves from a MIG 29 fighter aboard the country's largest warship, INS Vikramaditya, off the coast of Goa, India, on June 14.
STR Xinhua /Landov

India's new prime minister, Narendra Modi, says he has been denied the "honeymoon" period that new governments traditionally enjoy. Just one month after taking office, he has also asserted that he has defied expectations and secured a firm grip on India's sprawling government.

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Asia
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Iraqi Crisis Brings Focus On Indian Migrants Who Seek Profit Amid Peril

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. When ISIS militants took control of wide swaths of northern Iraq, foreign workers in those areas ended up being trapped. India is working to win the release of some 40 of its citizens abducted in the Iraqi city of Mosul. There are also hundreds more in other locations who are clamoring to leave. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Indians Caught In Middle Of Iraq's Worsening Crisis

Relatives hold up photographs of Indian workers who have been kidnapped in Iraq.
Adnan Abidi Reuters/Landov

The kidnapping of 40 Indian construction workers in Iraq by suspected militants has rapidly become the first foreign policy test for India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, barely a month after he assumed office.

The workers are believed to have been captured by militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) when the jihadist group overran the northern Iraqi city of Mosul this past week.

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Parallels
2:58 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

India's Transgender Community Turns Seat Belt Safety Into Video Hit

India's transgender community, known as hijras, stars in an ad promoting seat belt use across the country.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 12:36 pm

Members of India's transgender community, known as hijras, are now the stars of an entertaining advocacy campaign aimed at persuading India's motorists to buckle up.

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Parallels
3:09 am
Mon June 9, 2014

How A Lack Of Toilets Puts India's Women At Risk Of Assault

Women shout slogans during a protest against the gang rape and hanging of two teenage girls. Beyond highlighting the rampant sexual violence in India, the crimes are drawing attention to a glaring and fundamental problem across the country that threatens women's safety: the lack of toilets.
Altaf Qadri AP

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 9:27 am

A young girl sweeps fallen debris from a tempest that blew through her village of Katra Sahadatganj one recent evening. This remote spot in Uttar Pradesh — India's largest state — has become the center of another gathering storm.

It was here two weeks ago where two young girls were audaciously attacked: raped and hanged from a tree. Inter-caste violence and patriarchal attitudes combined to make a chilling spectacle in this impoverished place of mud-caked children and hand-pumped water.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Attack On Mother In India Underscores U.N. Call For Action

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:00 am

As U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon took notice of the global assault against women and girls, another brutal attack in India has highlighted once more the prevalence of gender-based crime in the world's largest democracy.

Police say a mother of five was shot dead by militants in a remote village in the northeast of the country after she resisted attempts to molest her.

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Parallels
4:20 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Double Rape, Lynching In India Exposes Caste Fault Lines

The gruesome gang rape and lynching of two young girls in northern India has sent shockwaves through the country and abroad. Vivendr Shakya, 21, brother of the younger victim, holds photos of both girls.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 12:42 am

A mother and grandmother's wailing rises in the garden of their cement-and-thatched home in the impoverished village of Katra Sahadatganj in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. They mourn two young girls who were raped and murdered a week ago.

The fresh scent of mint from nearby fields competes with the smell of cow dung baking in the sun.

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Asia
3:11 am
Mon June 2, 2014

India's New Prime Minister Takes A Stand On Foreign Policy

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:48 am

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, a conservative Hindu leader, defied expectations on his first day in office by holding a micro-summit with his country's principle rival, Muslim Pakistan.

Asia
3:17 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

India's New Prime Minister Sworn In

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 3:43 pm

Narendra Modi, a Hindu nationalist, officially takes office as India's new prime minister in a ceremony in New Delhi that broke with the past. More than 3,000 guests witnessed the most elaborate oath-taking India has ever staged.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
4:41 am
Mon May 26, 2014

After Landslide Victory, Modi Becomes India's Prime Minister

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 11:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's turn now to India where a new prime minister is taking office today. Narendra Modi's BJP party won a landslide victory last week. More than 3,000 people are attending an outdoor ceremony today for his swearing in, but one guest in particular is getting a lot of the attention. He is Pakistan's Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif, who said he is coming to India carrying a message of peace. NPR's Julie McCarthy is on the line with us from New Delhi. Good morning, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

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Asia
2:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Brash On The Campaign Trail, Modi Steps Into Parliament Humble

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:16 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Narendra Modi will be sworn in Monday as India's next prime minister. Today, the country's president invited him to form a new government. And Modi thanked his Hindu nationalist party for unanimously naming him as their parliamentary leader.

NPR's Julie McCarthy reports his speech was filled with emotion and some surprise.

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Asia
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

In Sea Change Election, Young India Ushers In A New Political Era

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland in for Arun Rath. This week, Narendra Modi and his BJP party won India's general election in a landslide. Modi's historic victory upends years of political domination by the Gandhi family, which has been a ruling power since India's independence. NPR's Julie McCarthy is in New Delhi, and I asked her what Modi's election says about the kind of country India is now?

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News
2:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

After Weeks Of Voting, India's Opposition Party Gets A Sweeping Win

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:51 pm

After several weeks, India's parliamentary elections have finally finished. Voters swept opposition leader Narendra Modi into power as prime minister, voting for the Hindu nationalist party he leads.

Asia
2:59 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Opposition Party Wins, India's Congress Party Concedes Defeat

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:07 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. We have today the sound of an historic election victory in India.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERS AND MUSIC)

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Asia
3:20 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Voting In India's Election Is Wrapping Up

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And this is the final day of voting in a parliamentary election in India. More than 500 million voters have cast ballots. So far, that's a 66 percent turnout, which if that number holds up, would be the highest ever in the world's largest democracy.

Economic development emerged as the key issue. It was also a battle for the direction of India as a secular state. And we're going to talk about all this with NPR's Julie McCarthy, who's on the line from Delhi. Hi, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Hi.

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Business
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

After Everest Tragedy, Who Pays When Climbing Season's Suspended?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The short climbing season on Mount Everest ended suddenly and sadly. The avalanche that killed 16 guides last Friday has shaken the Sherpa community and many have left the mountain. As a result, most expedition companies have cancelled their climbs. NPR's Julie McCarthy has more from Kathmandu on the next chapter, who pays when the season is suspended?

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Asia
4:51 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Injured Sherpa Explains Why He'll Never Climb Mount Everest Again

Kaji Sherpa, 39, survived the April 18 avalanche on Mount Everest. He says he will never set foot on the mountain again and work as a farmer instead.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 8:22 pm

Monitors flash Kaji Sherpa's vital signs as he recovers in the ICU of Katmandu's Norvic International hospital. Miraculously, the 39-year-old senior climber survived the wall of deadly ice and snow that crushed 16 of his colleagues in the largest loss of life in a single day on Everest, the mountain Sherpas call "Mother Goddess of Earth."

The team had been preparing a path for their clients, fixing ropes on a treacherous stretch known as the "Popcorn" ice field, so-called for its bulging chunks of ice.

"There was a small hill" that acted as a buffer, Kaji says.

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Parallels
5:13 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

A Journey Of Pain And Beauty: On Becoming Transgender In India

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: "I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly."
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 am

The signs came early that Abhina Aher was different.

Born a boy biologically and given the male name Abhijit, Aher grew up in a middle-class neighborhood of Mumbai, India. The son of a single mother who nurtured a love of dance, Aher would watch enthralled as she performed.

"I used to love to wear the clothes that my mother used to wear — her jewelry, her makeup," Aher, now 37, recalls. "That is something which used to extremely fascinate me."

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Parallels
1:40 am
Mon April 14, 2014

A Gold Obsession Pays Dividends For Indian Women

The R.C. Jewelry Store in New Delhi. Indian women have always treasured gold for its beauty and for providing a measure of social security. Today it is also being used to give them a larger say in the family's finances.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:24 pm

It's indestructible. It's fungible. It's beautiful. And for Indians, gold – whether it's 18-, 22- or 24-carat — is semi-sacred.

The late distinguished Indian economist I.G. Patel observed, "In prosperity as in the hour of need, the thoughts of most Indians turn to gold."

No marriage takes place without gold ornaments presented to the bride. Even the poorest Indian outfits girls in the family with a simple nose ring of gold.

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News
2:47 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Out Of Delhi, A Potential Sea Change For India Election

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Today marks a milestone in India's marathon national election for a new Lower House of Parliament. One-fifth of the 543-seats will be decided. Nationally, the big fight is between the ruling Congress Party and the opposition BJP. But one of the most closely watched contests is in Delhi, where corruption and anti-incumbency are hot button issues.

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Asia
3:14 am
Mon April 7, 2014

India's Election: Six Weeks Long, 814 Million Potential Voters

A woman in the northeastern Indian state of Tripura receives her identity card back from an election official on Monday. India began six weeks of voting in a country where more than 800 million are registered to cast ballots.
Saurabh Das AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 11:03 pm

S.Y. Quraishi, the former chief election commissioner, sums up voting in India this way: "The Indian election is not only the biggest election of the world — probably this is the biggest human event of the world."

Indians streamed to the polls Monday in the first stage of a nearly six-week-long national election, and the outcome is very much in doubt. The sheer size sets the election apart: A record 814 million people — more than the electorates of the United States and Europe combined — are eligible to cast ballots.

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Shots - Health News
3:41 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Southeast Asia Free Of Polio As India Declares Health Victory

Eight-year-old Manish, who caught polio years ago, learns to walk with leg braces at a rehabilitation center in New Delhi on Thursday.
Manish Swarup AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 4:08 pm

A watershed moment occurred in global health Thursday: The World Health Organization said that its Southeast Asian region is now officially polio-free.

The milestone means that 80 percent of the world's population now lives without fear of the paralyzing disease.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

India Sets Date For What Will Be World's Largest Vote

A wholesale shop in New Delhi was selling various Indian national and regional political party flags and campaign materials ahead of elections in India, the world's largest democracy.
Prakash Singh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:02 pm

India announced Wednesday that national elections for the lower house of Parliament will be staggered over nine separate days and begin April 7.

The voting to elect the 543-seat body will occur in stages to accommodate the scale of voters in what is expected to be the world's largest democratic exercise.

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The Edge
3:28 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Sochi Games Expose Indian Corruption And Redemption

Independent Olympic participant Shiva Keshavan makes a run during the men's luge training session ahead of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at the Sanki Sliding Center on Wednesday in Sochi, Russia.
Al Bello Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 5:11 am

It's one of the most dangerous sports at the Olympic Games. And when Indian slider Shiva Keshavan crashed from his sled during a training run at the luge track Friday, his miraculous recovery went viral.

Flying through icy curves feet first, Keshavan thundered down the frozen tunnel, the scraping blades or "steels" of his small sled sounding like a runaway train.

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Asia
3:01 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Alleged Gang Rape In India Draws Spotlight On Village Justice

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 5:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Parallels
2:35 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Indian Village Elders Accused Of Ordering Gang Rape

Police lead suspects in a gang rape case to a courthouse near the eastern Indian village of Subalpur on Thursday. A 20-year-old woman was allegedly gang raped on orders from tribal elders who objected to her relationship with a man outside her community.
STRDEL AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 8:50 pm

Atrocious instances of gang rape over the past year or so have shaken India, but the one this week in West Bengal has a particularly sinister twist.

An all-male village tribunal, said to be upset that a 20-year old tribal woman had fallen in love with a man outside the community, is alleged to have ordered she be gang-raped as punishment.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Wed January 22, 2014

New Delhi's 'Agitator' Administrator Ends Unusual Protest

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal (center) greets supporters from his blue wagon, which became a de facto local government headquarters during a two-day protest in New Delhi.
Prakash Singh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 2:56 pm

In New Delhi an unprecedented two-day sit-in that pitted the local government against the national authorities has come to an end following altercations between police and protesters.

Some 30 people were injured during the demonstration that was led by newly elected Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, the local administrator who rallied members of his Aam Aadmi Party, named for the "Common Man," against the central government.

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Asia
3:23 am
Tue January 21, 2014

New Force Emerges In Indian Politics: Common Man Party

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 6:07 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Asia
4:51 am
Wed January 15, 2014

With Bonfires And Dancing, Indians Ring In Hindu New Year

Indian women dance around a bonfire as they celebrate Lohri festival in Jammu, India, Monday. Lohri is a celebration of the winter solstice in India.
Channi Anand AP

Originally published on Wed January 15, 2014 12:35 pm

Northern India is recovering from its coldest temperatures in 20 years by doing what it loves to do: stage a festival.

Across the country this week, Indians frolicked around bonfires in traditional festivities meant to herald the end of winter.

The Punjabis of northern India celebrate this annual ritual with particular gusto in a centuries old festival known as Lohri.

By custom, Lohri falls on the auspicious Jan. 13, and is seen as marking the longest night of the year in northern India. In the southern part of the country, it's called Pongal.

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