Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

Thousands of Russian tourists were returning home from Egypt on Sunday, as suspicions mount that a bomb may have caused the crash of a St. Petersburg-bound charter jet over the Sinai on Oct. 31.

"Today is the busiest day in this sense," Russian Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich said Sunday.

Russia announced Friday it was suspending flights to Egypt until it determined the cause of the crash, which killed 224 people.

The United States and 11 other countries have signed an agreement aimed at discouraging currency manipulation, a practice critics say has widened the U.S. trade gap with countries such as China.

Under the agreement, countries promise to avoid "unfair currency practices and refrain from competitive devaluation."

They also have to regularly release certain kinds of financial data, such as foreign exchange reserves and capital flows, and consult regularly about their policies.

The debate over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the free-trade pact between the United States and 11 other countries, is about to heat up.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen continues to leave the door open for an interest rate hike in December, though she says that once rates start to rise, it will be "very gradual."

Testifying before the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday, Yellen said the economy is "performing well," with solid growth in domestic spending.

Video-game publisher Activision Blizzard Inc. is taking a big step into the mobile world, acquiring King Digital Entertainment, the maker of Candy Crush games, for $5.9 billion.

The deal will create the second biggest game company in the world, after Tencent, says the research firm Newzoo. It will have some 500 million active monthly users around the world.

U.S. Navy investigators have found the wreckage of the cargo ship El Faro, which sank off the Bahamas during Hurricane Joaquin with 33 people aboard, the National Transportation Safety Board has confirmed.

The U.S.-flagged ship was located after a week of searching by a crew from U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, using sonar equipment. It appears to be in an upright position and in one piece at a depth of about 15,000 feet.

China unveiled its first passenger jet Monday, part of an effort to compete in the lucrative commercial aircraft business now dominated by Boeing and Airbus.

The single-aisle, twin-engine C919 was developed by the state-run Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, or Comac. The jet was shown to a large crowd of government dignitaries in a hangar at an assembly plant outside Shanghai, near Pudong International Airport.

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Valeant Pharmaceuticals International is ending its relationship with Philidor Rx Services, because of questions raised about whether it was using the specialty pharmacy to boost sales of Valeant drugs over cheaper versions.

As a result, Philidor will shut down as soon as possible, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The U.S. economy grew at a considerably slower pace during the third quarter as companies cut back on the size of their inventories, the Commerce Department said.

Growth came in at an annual rate of 1.5 percent — a sharp slowdown from the 3.9 percent gain recorded in the preceding quarter. The economy has grown at about 2 percent so far this year.

Two of the nation's largest drug store chains want to merge, a deal that's certain to face intense scrutiny from federal regulators worried about its potential harm to consumers.

Walgreens Boots Alliance, the company that owns Walgreens drugstores, said yesterday that it has agreed to buy Rite Aid for about $9 a share, in a deal worth about $17 billion.

Lions are rapidly disappearing in large parts of Africa, and their population could be reduced by half outside of protected areas over the next two decades, according to a study published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

A few months ago, Federal Reserve policymakers were all but promising they would raise interest rates before the end of this year. Now, as the U.S. economy shows signs of a slowdown, a hike in 2015 is looking a lot less likely.

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The company that makes Legos has landed at the center of a social-media firestorm after Chinese artist Ai Weiwei complained that it refused to supply a bulk order of the toy bricks for his art.

Ai said he wanted to use the bricks for an exhibition on free speech at Australia's National Gallery of Victoria. The museum attempted to place an order but was told by the company that it "cannot approve the use of Legos for political works."

"We've been refused, and the reason is Lego will not support political art, which is very frustrating," Ai said in an interview with NPR.

On Monday a bipartisan group of House members will try to revive the Export-Import Bank, a federal government agency that finances exports — which its critics deride as little more than a slush fund for big corporations.

The agency, known as the Ex-Im bank, essentially stopped doing new business on July 1, after House leaders let its charter lapse at the behest of conservative Republicans who attacked it as "corporate welfare."

As criticism mounts over its business practices, multinational drug company Valeant Pharmaceuticals will hold a conference call Monday morning, in an effort to persuade Wall Street not to bail on its stock.

"We look forward to our call on Monday where we will address and refute recent allegations," said J. Michael Pearson, chairman and chief executive officer, in a statement.

U.S. officials have dropped insider trading charges against former hedge fund manager Michael Steinberg, after an appeals court ruling struck down convictions in a related case.

Prosecutors also dropped charges against six cooperating witnesses who had pleaded guilty in the same case.

U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement that the charges against the witnesses "would no longer be in the interest of justice."

The Obama Administration has suggested steps to help Puerto Rico emerge from its financial troubles but says it needs cooperation from Congress to really address the crisis.

Now, that's a lousy day in the market.

Valeant Pharmaceuticals, already under fire for its drug-pricing policies, was accused on Wednesday of creating phantom sales to falsely inflate revenues.

The allegations were made by Citron Research, a short-selling firm, in a report entitled, "Could this be the Pharmaceutical Enron?"

The European Union wants Starbucks to pay up to $34 million in back taxes, ruling that the company received illegal state aid from the Netherlands.

EU officials also alleged that Fiat benefited from a similar deal with Luxembourg.

"Tax rulings that artificially reduce a company's tax burden are not in line with EU state aid rules," said EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager. "They are illegal. All companies, big or small, multinational or not, should pay their fair share of tax."

With the number of drones in the sky increasing rapidly, U.S. officials want to come up with a registration system to lower the risk posed to other aircraft.

The use of drones has doubled since last year, and pilots have reported numerous sightings of them.

There have also been reports of incidents at sporting events and drones have interfered with recent efforts to fight wildfires, according to the Department of Transportation.

FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said these reports are troubling:

In a blog post published Monday morning, Amazon is pushing back against an August story in The New York Times that portrayed it as a soul-crushing workplace where employees were forced to work long hours and encouraged to tear each other apart at meetings.

She liked it so much, she bought the company.

Oprah Winfrey will acquire a 10 percent stake in Weight Watchers International for $43.2 million and take a seat on its executive board, the company announced today. She will also receive options to buy an additional 5 percent stake.

One person was killed and five were injured late Saturday when a shooter fired on a crowd at Zombicon, a Florida charitable festival where people dress up as zombies.

The shooting sent dozens of festival-goers, many of them in costumes, running through the streets of downtown Fort Myers, Fla., in chaos and panic, according to the News-Press.

The shooter is still at large, police said.

Double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius will be released on parole on Tuesday, one year after his conviction for killing his girlfriend by shooting her through a bathroom door, South African officials say.

He will be held temporarily under house arrest, and his parole will continue through 2019.

Taking on Wall Street makes for good politics in the Democratic Party. And several of the candidates at Tuesday night's debate had tough words about big banks. That was particularly true of former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Although he didn't say so directly, O'Malley suggested several times that consolidation in the banking business was a big factor in the 2008 financial crash and that the U.S. economy remains vulnerable because of it.

The Minnesota dentist who killed Cecil the black-maned lion in Zimbabwe last summer, generating international outrage, won't face charges and can return to the country, government officials said.

Zimbabwe officials announced last summer that they would try to extradite Walter Palmer, the big-game hunter who killed Cecil in a bow-hunt, after allegedly paying $50,000 for the "privilege." But after reviewing the case, they decided Palmer hadn't broken any hunting laws.

After just a week back on the job, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is making his presence felt in a big way, announcing plans to cut up to 8 percent of the workforce at the money-losing messaging company.

The cuts, some 336 of them, were approved by Twitter's board on Monday, as part of what the company calls "an overall plan to organize around the company's top product priorities and drive efficiencies."

In corporate speak, that means: "We need to get our act together before too many more investors lose patience with us."

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