Carrie Johnson

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PERSPECTIVES: Soman Chainani

Are you an Ever or a Never? On this program we'll visit with New York Times bestseller and acclaimed award-winning filmmaker Soman Chainani, author of THE SCHOOL FOR GOOD AND EVIL series. If you're a fairy tale character, you're either Good or Evil, but Chainani's books turn fairy tales on their heads.
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Weekdays from 9am to 10am

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard explores the world of news, economics, innovation and culture, every day — from a Texas perspective.

Latest from KTEP

  Do you have gardening questions?  Submit your questions and photos here: http://txmg.org/elpaso/outreach2/helpdesk/  

You can also e-mail your questions to elpasomg@ag.tamu.edu, or call Texas A&M AgriLife Extension at 915-771-2354, and they can connect you to a Master Gardener. Or, submit your questions, comments, and/or photos to the El Paso Master Gardener Facebook page: www.facebook.com/pages/El-Paso-Master-Gardeners/148950588460436.

Find the El Paso Master Gardeners on Instagram!  http://instagram.com/epmastergardener.

Here are some other helpful links:
http://elp.tamu.edu (Texas AgriLife Extension Service) to access the Extension Calendar and other Master Gardener activities.

http://txmg.org/elpaso/events/ (El Paso Master Gardeners) to access a local calendar, colorful photos, and helpful information. 

http://elp.tamu.edu/horticulture/ for other gardening resources.

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/ornamentals/elpasoplants/index.html (Recommended Ornamental Plants for Far West Texas)

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/lawn_garden/veg.html

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/travis/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/TexasHomeVegetableGardeningGuide.pdf

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable/easy-gardening-series/

(Home Vegetable Gardening).

  Plant warm-season grasses, such as Bermuda, Buffalo, Zoysia and St. Augustine.

Plant hot-weather annuals, such as lantana, moss rose, daisies, sunflowers and marigolds.

Thin fruit on peaches, apricots, and plums to five to six inches apart on the branches.  The result will be larger, better quality fruit.  

If flowers are spent, prune your spring-flowering shrubs and vines to shape them.

  We welcome back Wayne Pacelle, president & CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, and author of The Humane Economy: How Innovators and Enlightened Consumers are Transforming the Lives of Animals.  He explains why an economy focused on more humane behavior - safari photo tours vs game trophy hunting, or human-centered circuses vs 3-ring circuses with elephants, tigers, and bears - is far more successful than an economy centered on inhumane practices.  

http://www.humanesociety.org/about/events/humane-economy/?credit=web_id89991792_web_hpfs2_042716

Aired May 8, 2016

  

  The latest news in vegan nutrition and animal activism:

Another elephant has lost its life in the Cambodian tourist trade.  Read more at https://www.thedodo.com/sambo-elephant-ride-death-cambodia-1756955909.html

The Fish and Wildlife service is required to prepare a recovery plan for Mexican Gray Wolves by 2017.  Only 97 wolves remain in the wild.  Read more at http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2016/mexican-gray-wolf-04-26-2016.html

In the heart of Texas cattle country, Midland Memorial Hospital is encouraging its patients to adopt a plant-based diet for the treatment and prevention of disease.  Hear this report from The Texas Standard:  http://www.texasstandard.org/stories/veggies-in-cattle-country-texas-hospital-formally-promotes-plant-based-diet/

Aired May 8, 2016

  Dave Steele spent 30 years as an employee of Shell Oil, having spent many years searching for hydrocarbon sources across the globe.  He talks to us about the conventional ways of drilling for oil and the unconventional methods, which include hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking."  Is there an advantage or disadvantage to each method?  Plus, he explains why the price of oil is mostly driven by global politics, not by supply & demand.

Aired May 8, 2016

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Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

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West Point has said that 16 black female cadets did not violate any Department of Defense or Army regulations by posing with their fists raised in a photo taken ahead of their graduation from the academy.

No punitive action will be taken against the women after an inquiry found that their gesture was intended to demonstrate "unity" and "pride," a statement from the institution said.

In what is being billed as a "window into the future impacts of global sea-level rise," scientists have documented how the ocean swallowed up five small islands that were part of the Solomon Islands archipelago northeast of Australia.

Writing in the Environmental Research Letters, the researchers say this is the first scientific account of how climate change is affecting coastlines in the Solomons.

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry, who leads the league in scoring, steals and the seemingly impossible shots that he has made a habit of sinking from well beyond the 3-point line, has been named the NBA's Most Valuable Player for the second year in a row.

It's the first time a player has been unanimously chosen for the award.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET.

Texas' lieutenant governor is calling for the resignation of the Fort Worth Independent School District superintendent over guidelines intended to support transgender students.

The National Institutes of Health is overhauling the leadership of its world-renowned Clinical Center, after an independent task force found the center was putting research ahead of patient safety.

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NPR Politics

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Obama Gets All In His Blackness At Howard

9 hours ago

Could gender be a decisive factor in a general-election matchup between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton?

"You know, she's playing the woman's card," Trump told supporters at a rally in Spokane, Wash., over the weekend, reiterating a critique he has used against Clinton since becoming the de facto presidential nominee for the Republican Party. "If she didn't play the woman's card she would have no chance, I mean zero, of winning."

But some experts see Trump's comments about women as a veiled warning for men.

David Padilla spent nearly 20 years turning himself into a model inmate in federal prison. So when Padilla got called to the warden's office last December, he said, the first thought on his mind was, "Did I do anything wrong?"

Padilla's leg started shaking. Then, he got the news he was about to be freed.

This week Hillary Clinton was in Virginia to talk about women, family and workplace issues. She met at the Mug'n Muffin coffee shop with local participants in a program called Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters.

In HIPPY, as it's called, parents receive free books, educational materials and weekly home visits to coach them on how to get their young children ready for school — for example, by reading to them daily.

THE CLAIM

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Staples and Office Depot are calling off their $6.3 billion merger. The decision follows a ruling from a federal judge who said the deal would hurt competition in the office supplies industry.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports that Judge Emmet Sullivan issued a temporary injunction against the merger, saying that federal regulators had presented a strong case that the deal would substantially impair competition in the office supplies market.

Facebook and a top Republican Senator have responded to allegations from the tech website Gizmodo that Facebook is suppressing ideologically conservative news or stories from conservative organizations from its "trending topics" column.

The Food and Drug Administration is re-evaluating its definition of what counts as a "healthy" food.

The change comes as healthful fats — including fats found in nuts — are increasingly recognized as part of a good diet.

Currently, if a food company wants to put a "healthy" claim on its label, regulations stipulate that it must be very low in fat. The specific rules are complex, but, for instance, a snack food can contain no more than 3 grams of fat for a regular-size serving.

This means that many snacks that include nuts don't qualify as healthy.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Arts News

Rapper Kate Tempest has become kind of a sensation, winning awards as both a performer and a poet. In her hit debut album, Everybody Down, she told the story of Becky and Harry, two Londoners in their 20s who are struggling with work, love and drugs.

Now she has expanded that story into a novel called The Bricks That Built The Houses. She tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that when the idea for the story first came to her, she knew it would be both an album and a book.


Interview Highlights

On Becky

"More than most places, Pennsylvania is what lies beneath." That's a line Jennifer Haigh places at the beginning and the end of her latest novel, Heat & Light.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

What role should art play in society, and who's to say? These are just two of the questions Julian Barnes ponders in his slim but by no means slight new novel, which chronicles the tribulations of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich during his decades under the successive thumbs of Stalin and Khrushchev. Like his Booker Prize-winning The Sense of An Ending (2011), The Noise of Time is another brilliant thought-provoker which explores the costs of compromise and how much confrontation and concession a man and his conscience can endure.

The Code Switch Podcast Is Coming! Get A Sneak Peek!

16 hours ago

You've been asking for it. We've been cranking on it. And now, it's happening: the Code Switch podcast!

Check out the trailer and subscribe to our podcast so you don't miss the first episode later this month!

So, what's this podcast all about? Everything you come to Code Switch for: deeply reported, urgent, hard-to-pin-down stories about race and culture. Conversations about the messy ways our identities crash into everything else in our lives, whether we realize it or not.

More NPR Arts News

Bernie Sanders won the West Virginia Democratic primary on Tuesday over Hillary Clinton.

The Vermont senator's victory bolsters his decision to stay in the race even though the delegate math is heavily in Clinton's favor. Sanders won Indiana last week and could win several other states slated to vote this month.

Staples and Office Depot are calling off their $6.3 billion merger. The decision follows a ruling from a federal judge who said the deal would hurt competition in the office supplies industry.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports that Judge Emmet Sullivan issued a temporary injunction against the merger, saying that federal regulators had presented a strong case that the deal would substantially impair competition in the office supplies market.

West Point has said that 16 black female cadets did not violate any Department of Defense or Army regulations by posing with their fists raised in a photo taken ahead of their graduation from the academy.

No punitive action will be taken against the women after an inquiry found that their gesture was intended to demonstrate "unity" and "pride," a statement from the institution said.

For decades, the medical aid group Doctors Without Borders has been known for going places many other aid groups won't. But several times over the past two years its facilities have been hit by airstrikes in Syria, Yemen and Afghanistan. And now the group must adapt to a more threatening world.

Facebook and a top Republican Senator have responded to allegations from the tech website Gizmodo that Facebook is suppressing ideologically conservative news or stories from conservative organizations from its "trending topics" column.

NASA announced Tuesday the discovery of an unprecedented number of planets beyond our solar system — astronomers have confirmed the existence of 1,284 new worlds orbiting distant stars.

These planets beyond our solar system — exoplanets — were discovered with the help of NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, which launched in 2009.

The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, says it will not allow an admitted student to wear a Muslim headscarf. The woman's family is considering legal action, according to a Muslim advocacy group.

In a statement Tuesday, Citadel President John Rosa says, "Uniformity is the cornerstone of this four-year leader development model." Through a "relinquishing of self," the lieutenant general says, "cadets learn the value of teamwork to function as a single unit."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Food and Drug Administration is re-evaluating its definition of what counts as a "healthy" food.

The change comes as healthful fats — including fats found in nuts — are increasingly recognized as part of a good diet.

Currently, if a food company wants to put a "healthy" claim on its label, regulations stipulate that it must be very low in fat. The specific rules are complex, but, for instance, a snack food can contain no more than 3 grams of fat for a regular-size serving.

This means that many snacks that include nuts don't qualify as healthy.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The office hallway could be in Anytown, America, with its gray walls, bad lighting and piles of photocopy paper. That is, except for this distinguishing feature: an unknown man, armed with a weapon, who popped into view.

"Do I want to shoot this guy?" I asked the law enforcement trainer beside me.

The reply came fast: "Well, he's got a gun."

My weapon: a Glock equipped with a laser, not live ammunition — and thank goodness for that.

By last count, the Justice Department estimates about 80,000 U.S. inmates live in some kind of restricted housing.

That means being confined to a cell for about 22 hours a day.

"You are going to eat, sleep and defecate in a small room that's actually smaller than the size of your average parking space," said Amy Fettig, a lawyer who runs the Stop Solitary campaign for the American Civil Liberties Union. "And you're going to do that for months, years and sometimes even decades on end."

Fettig said solitary confinement is brutal and expensive.

More than two years ago, Justice Department officials held a news conference to unveil criminal charges against BP and several executives in connection with the largest oil spill in U.S. history.

But the Department of Justice task force created to hold the company and responsible individuals to account has a track record that's spotty at best.

On Friday, a federal jury in New Orleans acquitted the highest-ranking BP executive charged in connection with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion, after just five days of trial.

It's been just two months since the Justice Department indicted Sen. Robert Menendez on bribery and conspiracy charges. But lawyers in the case already seem to be, well, getting under each other's skin.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Supreme Court has dealt a blow to U.S. immigration officials in a closely watched case by ruling that a broad state anti-drug law may not be enough to justify deportation.

By a 7-2 vote, the court ruled that a Tunisian man convicted of carrying pills in his sock should not have been removed from the U.S. for that reason.

Prosecutors usually spend their energy putting criminals behind bars, not urging their release. But racial disparities in the system and the huge costs of locking up so many people are pushing some government officials to call for a new approach.

One of them is the woman who now runs day-to-day operations at the Justice Department. Sally Yates says she's hardly soft on crime: "I'm a career prosecutor."

#NPRreads is a feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you three reads.

From Carrie Johnson, who covers the Justice Department:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

David Clarke, the sheriff in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin doesn't think federal involvement in policing is going to change much. His reaction to the new White House report on 21st century policing, and what he told the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday, is that it's "heavy on federal involvement, federal control" but "it's not going to change the behavior of many law enforcement agencies or the behavior of many of the individuals of color that we come in contact with on the street that end up in deadly confrontations."

Lawmakers working on fixes to the justice system say that unrest in places like Ferguson, Mo., and Baltimore is pushing them to act.

"The whole idea of a young man dying in police custody, the confrontations with police, the looting and burning of innocent minority owned businesses," Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn said on the Senate floor this month. "The question arises, what can we do?"

From the moment she was taken into custody in 2012, outside a building that stores enriched uranium in Oak Ridge, Tenn., Sister Megan Rice has argued she has been driven by one thing — a desire to spread a message.

"And we all know that nuclear energy is linked inextricably with nuclear weapons," Rice told a group of activists in remarks captured on YouTube.

Prosecutors accused her of violating the Sabotage Act, intending to hurt the government's ability to wage war or defend itself.

A lawyer for John Hinckley told a federal judge Tuesday that it's time to grant the thwarted presidential assassin the power to leave a psychiatric hospital and live full time with his elderly mother in Virginia.

"Every witness agrees that he's ready and every witness agrees that the risk of danger is decidedly low," lawyer Barry William Levine argued.

The new U.S. attorney general said she watched the scenes of riots on the streets of Baltimore last week, her first day in office as the country's top law enforcement officer.

"I would have to say that my first reaction was profound sadness, it truly was," Loretta Lynch said.

But after meeting with community leaders and clergy Tuesday, and hearing their frustration over the death of a 25-year-old man who suffered a spinal injury in police custody, Lynch said her sadness hardened into resolve.

Two federal sources tell NPR that the Justice Department is preparing to launch a broad investigation into possible discriminatory policing in Baltimore.

The officials spoke anonymously because no formal announcement has been made, though the Associated Press says that could come as soon as Friday. The probe follows a request from city leaders and members of Congress.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

FBI Director James Comey says the bureau issued a bulletin on one of the two assailants at a Prophet Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, just three hours before the attack earlier this week.

Comey told reporters Thursday that the FBI had sent an Intel Bulletin to local law enforcement with a photo of Elton Simpson, his license plate number and other information without stating directly that he was heading to Garland.

Veteran prosecutor Raymond Hulser has been promoted to lead the Justice Department's Public Integrity Section, the unit that goes after corrupt public officials including lawmakers, judges and military contractors.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Outside an apartment building on Broad Street, along the county line in Philadelphia, birds outnumber the rush-hour traffic.

"It's nice and quiet compared to other neighborhoods which I lived in," said Tyrone Peake, 52.

In 1981, when he was just 18, Peake was arrested with a friend for trying to steal a car to take a girl home after a long weekend.

"No, we never got the car," Peake said. "We broke the ignition column and then the cops came."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

"Hey," the attorney general said as he walked into his final meeting with senior staffers Friday morning. "Let's do this one last time."

After more than six years running the Justice Department, Eric Holder took a seat at his polished wooden table and prepared to close the door on an institution where he'd spent countless hours since September 1976.

Hearing the words of a 24-year-old victim of human trafficking — and her struggle to wipe away her conviction on prostitution charges — inspired New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen.

That young victim, who was featured in an NPR story in February, endured years of rapes and brutal assaults by pimps who forced her into prostitution.

"I'm not ever going to forget what I've done or what I've gone through. But at the same time, I don't want it thrown in my face every time I'm trying to seek employment," she said. "I don't want to have to explain myself every time."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Senate voted Thursday, 56-43, to approve the nomination of Loretta Lynch to serve as U.S. attorney general, ending a more than five month-long political impasse that had stalled her bid to become the first black woman to lead the Justice Department.

Lynch, 55, grew up in the shadow of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, where her family had preached for generations. Most recently, she prosecuted terrorists, mobsters and white collar criminals as the top federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, a district that covers 8 million people.

The man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981 is making a new push for freedom.

John Hinckley Jr. was found not guilty by reason of insanity and confined to a mental institution for shooting the president, Press Secretary James Brady and two law enforcement officers. Now he's asking a federal judge to allow him to live full time with his mother in Virginia.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Robyn Gritz spent 16 years at the FBI, where she investigated a series of major national security threats. But she says she got crosswise with her supervisors, who pushed her out and yanked her security clearance.

For the first time, she's speaking out about her situation, warning about how the bureau treats women and the effects of a decade of fighting terrorism.

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