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The Salt
1:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Journey To Java's 'Tempeh Village': Where Soybean Cakes Are Born

Preparing the soy beans to be fermented
Anthony?

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:50 am

For centuries, Asia has been home to sophisticated vegetarian cultures. In recent years, Americans have gradually discovered cooking with meat substitutes like tofu and an Indonesia soybean cake called tempeh.

Tempeh is known for being versatile. There's an almost endless variety of ways to cook it. My favorite is perhaps one of the simplest: Cut it into thin slices, cover it in spices and crushed coriander seeds, and pan-fry it in a little oil until it's golden brown.

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Research News
1:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Why Not Apologizing Makes You Feel Better

Illustration by NPR

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:50 am

To err is human.

So is refusing to apologize for those errors.

From toddlers and talk show hosts to preteens and presidents, we all know people who have done stupid, silly and evil things, then squared their jaws and told the world they've done nothing wrong.

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Asia
1:15 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Pakistan's Ambitious Program To Re-Educate Militants

Pakistani men who worked for the Taliban attend a class at Mishal, an army-run rehabilitation center in Pakistan's Swat Valley, on July 5, 2011. This and similar centers are trying to re-educate men taken in by the Taliban, who ruled Swat before the military drove out the insurgents in 2009.
Farooq Naeem AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:50 am

A Pakistani army officer named Col. Zeshan is giving a tour of a jihadi rehabilitation center secreted in the hills of northwest Pakistan's Swat Valley.

"This place was also captured by the Taliban," he says, walking me around the heavily guarded complex. "The army took over this place from them ... when the war was going on."

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Science
4:28 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

Somewhere Over The Brainbow: The Journey To Map the Human Brain

More than 100 years ago, Golgi staining on nerve cells opened the gates to modern neuroscience. Scientists recently developed the Technicolor version of Golgi staining, Brainbow, allowing more detailed reconstructions of brain circuits.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 7:55 pm

During the State of the Union, President Obama said the nation is about to embark on an ambitious project: to examine the human brain and create a road map to the trillions of connections that make it work.

"Every dollar we invested to map the human genome returned $140 to our economy — every dollar," the president said. "Today, our scientists are mapping the human brain to unlock the answers to Alzheimer's."

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Performing Arts
3:22 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

For Female Magicians, The First Trick Is Being Accepted

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:28 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan talks to female magician, Dorothy Dietrich, on the struggles of being a female in a male dominated magic world.

Author Interviews
3:08 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

An Unlikely Explorer Stumbles Into Controversy

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 11:03 am

The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption.

Author Monte Reel illuminates the little-known tale of the 19th century explorer in his new book Between Man and Beast: An Unlikely Explorer, the Evolution Debates, and the African Adventure That Took the Victorian World by Storm.

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History
3:08 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

Living Memories From The Last Days Of Alcatraz

Alcatraz, the infamous prison, still captures the imagination 50 years after it closed. Those who did time there, however, don't have to wonder.
Leigh Wiener Courtesy Devik Wiener

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:28 pm

Fifty years ago, the notorious Alcatraz prison shut its gate behind guard Jim Albright as he escorted the last inmate off the island on March 21, 1963.

"As we're going out, I know, when I come back from this trip, I don't have a job, I don't have a home anymore," Albright remembers. "I didn't want the island to close, I didn't want to leave. I liked it there."

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The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

A New Search For 9/11 Victims' Remains

People pass the World Trade Center construction site in New York. Debris from the fallen towers will be sifted for victims' remains beginning Monday.
Mark Lennihan AP

About 60 dump trucks full of debris from the fallen World Trade Center will be sifted for victims' remains beginning Monday. The debris was collected for the past two and a half years from construction sites in the neighborhood.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

'Egypt's Jon Stewart' Questioned For Five Hours

Television satirist Bassem Youssef waves to supporters as he enters Egypt's state prosecutors office to face accusations of insulting Islam and the country's Islamist leader in Cairo on Sunday.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:34 pm

After nearly five hours of questioning, the satirist known as the "Egyptian Jon Stewart" was released on bail Sunday.

Bassem Youssef is charged with insulting Islam and President Mohammed Morsi. He's among the most prominent critics of Egypt's Islamist president to be called in for questioning recently, prompting concerns that the president is cracking down on his detractors and members of the opposition.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Texas District Attorney, Wife Found Dead At Home

This undated photo taken from the Kaufman County, Texas, website shows Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland. McLelland and his wife were found killed in their house on Saturday.
AP

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 12:36 pm

The FBI, Texas Rangers and local police are investigating the killings of a Texas district attorney and his wife, who were found dead on Saturday. The slayings come two months after an assistant district attorney for the same county was shot dead in a parking lot a block from his office.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Immigration Reform Gets One Step Closer To A Bill

From left, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-NY, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Michael Bennett, D-Colo, arrive at a news conference after their tour of the Mexico border with the United States on Wednesday in Nogales, Ariz. The senators are part of the "Gang of Eight," a larger group of legislators collaborating on changes to immigration.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 11:37 pm

A final deal on a changing immigration laws is at hand but still incomplete, according to two of the bipartisan "Gang of Eight" senators collaborating on it.

On NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday, Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York and Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona discussed a new agreement on a low-skilled worker program as a positive sign of progress, but both said there is more to be done.

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Movie Interviews
8:03 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Cristian Mungiu: Metaphor Or Not, 'Hills' Has Eyes For Romania's Past

Director Cristian Mungiu on the set of his new film, Beyond the Hills. As in his earlier 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, the filmmaker focuses on two young women adrift in the post-Soviet wilderness of Romania.
Sundance Selects

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:28 pm

Cristian Mungiu became the poster boy for the Romanian New Wave when his film 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days took the top prize at the Cannes International Film Festival in 2007. Like that film, Mungiu's latest turns an unblinking camera on two troubled young women in a dysfunctional society. Beyond the Hills is now opening in theaters across the U.S.

Like its predecessor, Beyond the Hills was a prizewinner at Cannes: Its two young stars shared the best actress prize last year, and Mungiu won best screenplay.

The story he tells is disturbing.

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The Two-Way
5:34 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Cause Of Exxon Oil Spill In Arkansas Under Investigation

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:18 pm

Authorities are investigating what caused an Exxon Mobil pipeline to rupture in Mayflower, Ark., Friday. The oil spill caused 22 homes to be evacuated, according to an Exxon statement.

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Europe
5:33 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Pope Francis Delivers First Easter Sunday Mass

After celebrating Mass along with more than 250,000 faithful, Pope Francis delivered a plea for peace in his first Easter Sunday message to the world, decrying the seemingly endless conflicts in the Middle East and on the Korean Peninsula.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 4:19 pm

Pope Francis celebrated his first Easter Sunday Mass praying for world peace and urging a diplomatic solution to the standoff on the Korean peninsula.

Only two weeks after his election, the first pope from the developing world continues to make his mark on the Catholic Church.

St. Peter's Square was bedecked with flowers and packed with joyous pilgrims and tourists as Pope Francis celebrated Easter Mass.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun March 31, 2013

In Alice McDermott's 'Charming Billy', Love Turns To Grief

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 8:12 am

Harold Augenbraum is the executive director of the National Book Foundation.

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Middle East
4:35 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Syrian Rebels' Gains Could Be Due To Influx Of Weapons

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The struggle for Syria continued this past week. Since the conflict has now moved beyond the two-year mark, hopes for a political solution have ebbed and flowed with no clear end in sight while tens of thousands of people have died. This week, the violence continued even on the campus of the main University of Damascus when a mortar attack killed at least 10 students at an outdoor cafe.

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Sports
4:35 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Charging Toward Men's Final Four

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

Half of the Final Four in the men's NCAA tournament is set, and four other teams play Sunday. Host Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Mike Pesca about what it took a couple of these teams to get here.

The Salt
3:42 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Italy's Chocolate Easter Eggs: Big, Bold And Full Of Bling

In 2012, an Italian chocolatier presented Benedict XVI, now pope emeritus, with a 6.5-foot-tall chocolate Easter egg weighing some 550 pounds.
L'Osservatore Romano AP

In Italy, there are no Easter egg hunts, no marshmallow Peeps and definitely no jelly beans.

Instead, there are chocolate eggs — massive, elaborately decorated, beautifully wrapped chocolate Easter eggs that now fill shop windows across the country. The sweet treats are considered Italians' food gift of choice at this time of year. And each one comes with a surprise tucked inside.

"You want something that really gives a big effect," says Rome-based food writer Elizabeth Minchilli.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Hiding In Plain Sight

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 8:25 am

On-air challenge: You will be given some words. For each one, you provide a four-letter word that can follow the first to complete a familiar two-word phrase. The four letters of the second word can always be found inside the first word. For example, given "personal," the answer would be "loan."

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Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

In A New Memoir, Maya Angelou Recalls How A 'Lady' Became 'Mom'

Maya Angelou and her mother, Vivian Baxter. Although it took years, Angelou and her mother eventually developed a close and loving relationship.
Random House

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:40 pm

Maya Angelou has lived a life so expansive and extraordinary that, even after seven autobiographies, she still has more stories to tell. Her latest book, Mom & Me & Mom, explores her relationship with her mother, Vivian Baxter. When Angelou was young, Baxter sent Angelou and her brother away to be raised by their grandmother; years later, she called them back to live with her again, the start of a sometimes fractious but eventually loving relationship.

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Sports
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Defending Women's Champs Baylor To Battle Cardinals' Tough Defense

Baylor's Brittney Griner goes up to dunk in a second-round game of the NCAA women's college basketball tournament against Florida State on Tuesday in Waco, Texas. On Sunday, Baylor faces Louisville.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 12:52 pm

The NCAA women's basketball tournament's Sweet 16 round continues Sunday, with No. 1 overall seed Baylor taking on No. 5 University of Louisville. Baylor is the defending national champion, and is widely considered the team to beat in this tournament.

Baylor has been one of the most successful women's programs in the nation since head coach Kim Mulkey's first national championship in 2005. The Lady Bears have lost only one game in the past two seasons, and Brooklyn Pope, the lone graduate student on the roster, says they're mentally tougher in 2013.

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Around the Nation
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Coming Out: A Gay Mormon Navigates Family, Faith And Sexuality

Courtesy of Jamison Manwaring

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 2:11 pm

Jamison Manwaring says he wants marriage and kids — but that will be difficult for him because he's a gay Mormon.

Manwaring grew up in Idaho Falls, Idaho, the youngest of eight children in a devout Mormon family. According to the Mormon church, same-sex attraction is itself not a sin but yielding to it is.

After coming home from a two-year mission at 21, Manwaring was determined to find a wife and get married. He dated women "vigorously," but his attraction to men would not go away.

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Music Interviews
3:39 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Bridging Arabic And Western Music With An Unusual Instrument

Classically trained Lebanese trumpeter Ibrahim Maalouf plays a four-valved trumpet, an innovation he credits to his famous father.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:25 pm

Ibrahim Maalouf plays a four-valve trumpet — most just have three. The extra valve, attached to the button a trumpeter pushes down, allows the Lebanese musician to play quarter-tones — the notes between notes that characterize Arabic "makams."

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Health Care
3:40 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Three Years On, States Still Struggle With Health Care Law Messaging

Joy Reynolds of San Diego looks at the newspapers on display at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on June 29, 2012, following the Supreme Court ruling on President Obama's health care law.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

It is hard to imagine that after three years of acrimony and debate we could still be so confused about President Obama's Affordable Care Act.

Is it actually possible Americans know less about Obamacare now than they did three years ago? Apparently that is the case, and the news comes just as the most sweeping effects of the law are about to kick in.

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Movie Interviews
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Why Actor James McAvoy Almost Turned Down 'Trance'

In director Danny Boyle's upcoming film Trance, James McAvoy plays Simon, an art auctioneer whose gambling problem pushes him into an awkward relationship with a group of criminals.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

Scottish actor James McAvoy stars in the new heist thriller Trance. It's the latest film from director Danny Boyle, best known for the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire.

In Trance, McAvoy plays Simon, an art auctioneer with a gambling problem who ends up mixed in with a gang of criminals.

Although the 33-year-old has been dying to work with Boyle for years, he says he almost didn't take the part.

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Author Interviews
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

'Game Over': Mixing Sports and Politics

The New Press

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:27 pm

The uneasy confluence of sports and politics is featured in a new book by The Nation's Dave Zirin, called Game Over: How Politics Has Turned the Sports World Upside Down.

During the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War, athletes routinely made their political views known. In some cases, that isolated them from sports fans. In other cases, their influence led to real change. But in recent decades, those voices fell silent. Some say the siren's call of endorsement deals made them gun-shy about speaking their minds.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

The Movie Saoirse Ronan Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Alicia Silverstone (from left), Brittany Murphy and Stacey Dash in Clueless.
Elliot Marks AP

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Business
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

How Samsung Became An Industry Giant

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

Quick trivia question: Name a global superpower technology company, that is the world's biggest seller of smartphones headed by a charismatic CEO surrounded by a cult of personality. I'm guessing most of you just said Apple, right? You would be wrong. The answer is Samsung.

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Around the Nation
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

For One Military Family, DOMA Decision Will Hit Close To Home

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

Same-sex couples in the military will be watching closely now that the U.S. Supreme Court is considering the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Anxiously awaiting a decision are Army lieutenant colonel Heather Mack and her wife, Ashley Broadway, who've been together for 15 years and have two children. They say repealing DOMA would help many enlisted same-sex military couples, who don't receive funds to move non-military spouses from one base to the next.

Remembrances
2:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Remembering Legendary Music Producer Phil Ramone

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 4:25 pm

Music producer Phil Ramone, who worked on albums by Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto, has died at the age of 72. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan looks back at some of the huge records that benefitted from his magic touch.

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