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3:31 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

In Seaside Cypriot Town, Russians Of Modest Means Cry Foul

The owner of a Russian market helps customers in Limassol, Cyprus. Many middle-class Russians here say their community is being unfairly depicted as a group of money-laundering oligarchs.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:51 pm

Borscht and vareniki are on the menu at Taras Bulba, a restaurant named after Nikolai Gogol's Ukrainian folk hero. It's one of many Russian-owned businesses in Limassol, Cyprus.

Approximately 30,000 Russians live in this city — about a quarter of the population. There are Russian hair salons, supermarkets, schools and even a radio station.

Limassol's mayor, Andreas Christou, studied mechanical engineering in Moscow and speaks Russian fluently. He says Russians came to the city in droves after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

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The Salt
3:28 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Eat Fish And Prosper?

We've all heard that eating fish is good for us. Regularly eating fish has been linked to a host of health benefits – for our hearts, our eyes, and our brains.

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Theater
3:25 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Nora Ephron's 'Lucky Guy' And Tom Hanks Make Their Broadway Debuts

Nora Ephron's final play, Lucky Guy, tells the story of controversial New York columnist Mike McAlary, played by Tom Hanks. (Also pictured: Peter Gerety as John Cotter).
Boneau / Bryan-Brown

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:57 pm

Several years ago, when Nora Ephron handed Tom Hanks an early draft of Lucky Guy, her play about tabloid journalist Mike McAlary, he had a pretty strong reaction.

"I said, 'Well, that guy's sure a jerk!' I used another word besides jerk — I know what you can say on NPR," he says. "And she laughed and she said, 'Well, he kinda was. But he was kinda great, too.'"

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All Tech Considered
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

'Bioshock Infinite': A First-Person Shooter, A Tragic Play

BioShock Infinite revolves around an Aristotelian tragedy with tragic heroes, grounded in a floating city set in 1912.
Courtesy of Irrational Games/2K Games

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 7:19 pm

In a first-person shooter video game, your targets range from zombies to soldiers, aliens or any other variation of "enemy." Most people wouldn't call that art. But BioShock Infinite creator Ken Levine says he's aiming to transform the genre.

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Politics
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Bipartisan Group Of Senators Could Have Immigration Bill Drafted By Next Week

Senators negotiating an overhaul of immigration laws turned to labor and business leaders to devise a new plan for guest workers, but not all of them are ready to commit to the plan those leaders have worked out.

Business
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Electric Car Company Posts Its First Profit While Another May File For Bankruptcy

Two startup automakers with big ambitions for electric vehicles appear to be headed in different directions. Luxury plug-in hybrid maker Fisker has hired a law firm to advise it on a possible bankruptcy, according to multiple published reports. Electric car maker Tesla announced on Monday that it expects to turn its first ever profit in the first quarter.

Religion
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

With New Pope, Catholic Women Hope To Regain Church Leadership Roles

Parishioners partake in the Way Of The Cross procession at the Colosseum on Good Friday in Rome. A group of women Catholics recently made a pilgrimage to Rome to request that women once again be allowed to hold leadership positions in the church.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:45 pm

The newly elected pope's focus on the poor and the marginalized has instilled great faith among many Catholic women. They hope the papacy of Pope Francis will promote a leading role for women in the church.

A group of American nuns and Catholic women recently made a pilgrimage to Rome to make their requests heard.

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Law
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Aryan Brotherhood Group May Be Linked To Death Of Texas Prosecutor

Texas and federal investigators looking into the dual killings of two Dallas prosecutors are questioning the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. The violent "white power" gang originated in the Texas prison system and carries on a number of illegal enterprises. Robert Siegel talks with Kevin Krause, who covers crime for the Dallas Morning News.

Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Texas County On High Alert After Second Law Official Is Killed

Kaufman County, Texas, is coming to grips Monday with the Easter-weekend shootings of the district attorney and his wife at their home — just two months after his top assistant district attorney was gunned down on the way to work. Local, state and FBI investigations are in high gear, and it's not clear whether officials are tying the latest killings to a case last month in Colorado, where the state's prison chief was shot and killed at home.

U.S.
3:17 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

New Visa Would Allow At Least 20,000 Low-Wage Workers To Come To U.S.

The Senate is closer to an immigration plan that includes a new visa program for low-wage workers. The visa plan was agreed to by the AFL-CIO and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and will provide at least 20,000 visas starting in 2015. Robert Siegel speaks with Tom Snyder, manager of the AFL-CIO's Citizenship Now campaign, who helped craft the plan.

Economy
3:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Stockton Bankruptcy Case Defers Decision On Pensions

An aging sign at City Hall in Stockton, Calif. A judge has ruled that the city is eligible for federal bankruptcy protection.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:41 pm

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein ruled Monday on the most important question facing Stockton, Calif. — whether it could enter into federal bankruptcy protection.

Klein agreed that the city is, in fact, broke.

But he didn't decide the question of whether the city must renegotiate its pension obligations, as some of its creditors had hoped.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Hard Times At Apple: Apology To China Comes As Stock Slides

People line up to enter a newly-opened Apple Store in Wangfujing shopping district in Beijing.
Andy Wong AP

In an unusual move on Monday, Apple CEO Tim Cook apologized to Chinese customers over the company's warranty policy and vowed to improve customer service in the country.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Star Of MTV's 'Buckwild' Found Dead

One of the stars of the MTV reality show Buckwild was found dead Monday in an SUV along with his uncle and a third, as-yet-unidentified person, the Kanawha County, W.Va., Sheriff's Office said.

The bodies of Shain Gandee, 21, his uncle David Gandee, 48, and the third person were inside a 1984 Ford Bronco in a wooded area near Sissonville, W.Va., about 15 miles from Charleston. A statement from the Sheriff's Office said there was no sign of foul play.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Tech Week Ahead: Rumors Of A Facebook Phone

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 3:17 pm

Steve Henn looks at this week's technology news, including a possible Facebook phone announcement on Thursday and a nod to the multiple April Fools' Day jokes on the Internet.

It's All Politics
2:29 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Immigration Overhaul Inches Forward, But Big Hurdles Remain

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., says talk of a bipartisan agreement among eight key senators working on immigration law is "premature."
Susan Walsh AP

It's still far too early to know whether Congress will actually be able to achieve a comprehensive overhaul to the nation's immigration laws. All that's certain at this stage is that lawmakers on both sides of the partisan divide, and in both chambers, continue to act as though they think they can.

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The Two-Way
1:52 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Judge's Ruling Makes Stockton, Calif., Most Populous City To Enter Bankruptcy

A judge accepted the California city of Stockton's bankruptcy application on Monday, making it the most populous city in the nation to enter bankruptcy.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 2:11 pm

Stockton, Calif., is now the most populous city in the U.S. to enter bankruptcy, after a decision by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein on Monday.

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It's All Politics
1:42 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Opposition Research Boot Camp: Learning To Dig For Political Dirt

Opposition research is becoming a given in politics, sometimes even at the local level.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 6:29 pm

Opposition research exists mostly in the political shadows. So perhaps it's fitting that this boot camp is in an generic conference room in a generic airport hotel outside of Washington, D.C.

It's run by private investigator Larry Zilliox, who specializes in opposition research. He allowed me to attend a session, but not to take pictures.

Zilliox is cagey about his clients: "As a general rule, it suits me best not to comment on who I've worked for. Everybody is better off that way."

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Shots - Health News
1:41 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

When anthropologists tallied the use of emotional words through a century of literature, they included many books without clear emotional content — technical manuals, for example, and automotive repair guides.
Steve Debenport iStockphotography

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:18 am

Were people happier in the 1950s than they are today? Or were they more frustrated, repressed and sad?

To find out, you'd have to compare the emotions of one generation to another. British anthropologists think they may have found the answer — embedded in literature.

Several years ago, more or less on a lark, a group of researchers from England used a computer program to analyze the emotional content of books from every year of the 20th century — close to a billion words in millions of books.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Expert: Recent Attacks On Justice Community 'Really Unprecedented'

The home of Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland is surrounded by police tape in Forney, Texas, on Monday. Authorities launched a massive investigation into the weekend killings of McLelland and his wife.
Tim Sharp Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:32 pm

Two county prosecutors fatally shot in Texas. Colorado's top prison official gunned down. And a dozen more members of the U.S. justice community — ranging from police to judges — victims of targeted killings since the beginning of the decade.

What's going on?

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Arizona Rep: Gay Son Hasn't Changed View On Same-Sex Marriage

Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz., being interviewed on Phoenix news station 3TV. Salmon, whose son is openly gay, says he remains opposed to same-sex marriage.
Screengrab via 3TV

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:17 pm

In a weekend interview, Rep. Matt Salmon, a Republican of Arizona, told a local news station that his openly gay son has not changed his position on same-sex marriage.

As you might recall, it was big news when another Republican, Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio, said his son's homosexuality inspired him to change his position on same-sex marriage.

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The Salt
12:43 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Chili Bomb

Chili Bombs with a side of Totally Unnecessary Cheese Sauce.
NPR

The problem with chili has always been this: When you try to eat it with your hands, you get terrible burns and weird looks from the snooty side of your family at the 2007 Chillag Family Reunion. Speaking of which — why don't you guys just go back to your solid gold houses and your Harvard "utensils" and leave me alone? I am who I am.

Anyway, the great Wiener and Still Champion in Evanston, Ill., has solved this problem with the Chili Bomb. It's chili, mixed with melted cheese, wrapped in cornbread and fried.

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

A State Apart And, Politically, A World Away

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:13 pm

There's a reason President Obama chose Colorado to hold a rally this Wednesday in favor of gun control.

Among the states this year, Democratic-controlled Colorado has passed the toughest new restrictions on gun rights, requiring universal background checks and banning magazines that hold more than 15 rounds of ammunition.

But if certain liberal wishes have come true in Colorado — recall that it was one of two states last fall that voted to legalize marijuana — things look very different next door in Kansas.

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Politics
12:27 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

The Politics Of The Guest-Worker Program

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO agreed on a plan for a new system to import temporary workers. NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving discusses the politics of the business-labor immigration deal. Rusty Barr, owner of Barr Evergreens, shares how he uses the guest-worker program.

The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Once Again, Polls Show Attitudes Toward Guns Returning To Pre-shooting Levels

Guns on display at a show in Chantilly, Va., in July 2012.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /Landov

The day after last December's mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School we wrote that:

"The tragedy in Newtown, Conn., will surely spur pollsters to ask Americans again about guns, gun ownership, gun laws and the Second Amendment.

"If recent experience is a good guide, public opinion may not shift too much."

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Electric Car Maker Tesla Will See First Quarterly Profit

A Tesla Model S drives outside the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif., on June 22. The electric car was named Automobile of the Year by Automobile Magazine and Car of the Year by Motor Trend.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 12:57 pm

Tesla Motors, the car company on a mission to change the auto industry, announced late Sunday that it's finally turning a profit this quarter.

The company said it will deliver 4,750 of its flagship Model S, its much-lauded four-door, luxury sports sedan. That amount exceeds its earlier estimates of 4,500 cars sold this quarter.

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Remembrances
12:03 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Listening Back To An Interview With Phil Ramone

Phil Ramone in New York in 1997.
Ken Weingart Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. We're going to remember the record producer and engineer Phil Ramone who died Saturday at the age of 79. He won 14 Grammys. He started his career as an engineer, recording singers like Lesley Gore, Dusty Springfield and Dionne Warwick. He went on to produce recordings by Paul Simon, Billy Joel, Barbara Streisand, Ray Charles and Tony Bennett as well as the original cast recording of Stephen Sondheim's "Passion."

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Opinion
12:00 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Op-Ed: The Iraq War's Lessons For Syria

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 6:23 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now Syria and Iraq on the Opinion Page this week. As we reconsider the 10 years since the invasion of Iraq, Washington Post editor Jackson Diehl says we should learn from that costly experience as we consider the civil war in Syria. About absent U.S. intervention, he argues, Syria could produce a much worse humanitarian disaster than Iraq. The tragedy of the post-Iraq logic embraced by President Obama, writes Diehl, is that it has ruled out not just George W. Bush-style invasions, but also more modest interventions.

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Author Interviews
11:54 am
Mon April 1, 2013

In Digestion: Mary Roach Explains What Happens To The Food We Eat

iStockphoto.com

For all our talk about food, we don't like to think much about it after we put it in our mouths. But Mary Roach — whose latest book is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal — did just that. Gulp takes a close look at the human digestive system, from the mouth on down, and Roach writes that she wants readers to say not, "This is gross," but instead, "I thought this would be gross, but it's really interesting. OK, and maybe a little gross."

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Shots - Health News
11:44 am
Mon April 1, 2013

What's In A Name? More Drugs For Babies If It's GERD

Frequent spitting up affects about half of babies under six months, but it's usually not gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:00 am

Say your one-month-old baby is spitting up and crying a lot. Your usual bag of infant-soothing tricks hasn't worked, and you're worried that there's something wrong with her.

So you head to the pediatrician, who tells you that your otherwise healthy child has gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Would receiving this medical diagnosis make you more interested in giving her drugs than if you never heard the word "disease"?

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All Songs Considered
11:27 am
Mon April 1, 2013

How To Never Miss Another Concert

Don't miss Merchandise in your town ever again.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:11 am

I love live music. But figuring out who's coming to town and when and where isn't so easy. I could go to every club's website to compile a list of upcoming shows, but that'd be cumbersome. Newspaper listing are often incomplete, don't look ahead and certainly don't filter or highlight who's in town based on my musical tastes.

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