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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

The Movie Chris O'Dowd Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey in a scene from the 1987 movie Dirty Dancing.
Archive Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 7:41 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
3:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

For Toms River, An Imperfect Salvation

Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 12:03 pm

In 1953, the Swiss chemical company Ciba came to Toms River, N.J. By all accounts, the community was delighted to have it. The chemical plant for manufacturing textile dye brought jobs and tax revenue to the small town on the Jersey shore. The company invested in the town's hospital and donated land for a golf course.

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Business
3:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Goldman Sachs Hopes To Profit By Helping Troubled Teens

About half the juvenile offenders released from prison on Rikers Island in New York return within a year, New York City Department of Corrections Commissioner Dora Schriro says.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 5:07 pm

In the New York City prison system, the outlook for juvenile offenders is bleak. They're falling through the cracks, being arrested repeatedly, and being re-released onto the same streets only to be picked up again.

The criminal justice system is failing these 16- and 17-year-olds, says Dora Schriro, the commissioners of the city's Department of Corrections.

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History
3:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Marking Forgotten Slave Burial Sites, Online

Ben Harmon, Sandra Arnold's great-grandfather, was born a slave. He was buried on a former plantation in Tennessee and served as the inspiration for Arnold's project.
Courtesy of Sandra Arnold.

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 5:07 pm

It all started on a former plantation in Tennessee. That's where Sandra Arnold's great-grandfather, Ben Harmon, who was born a slave, is buried next to his wife, Ethel. Their final resting spots are clearly marked, gravestone and all, but next to them, Arnold noticed an entire area of unmarked slave graves. She wondered if they could be family, too.

Her research started on that plot, then expanded to the state of Tennessee. Eventually, Arnold learned that it wasn't uncommon to find unmarked slave burial places across the country.

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Around the Nation
3:01 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Where's George?: The Trail Of $1 Bills Across The U.S.

A group of hobbyists has been tracking the movement of stamped "Where's George?" $1 bills across the country.
Prince Roy Flickr

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:08 pm

When you hear the words "social network" you probably think of Facebook or Twitter. But years before either of those websites — when most of us weren't using the Internet at all — a smaller, stranger community was emerging around something called WheresGeorge.com, a 15-year-old subculture that's dedicated to the $1 bill.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Ex-President Musharraf Returns To A Different Pakistan

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf greets supporters upon his arrival at Karachi airport in Pakistan on Sunday.
S.I. Ali AP

After four years of self-imposed exile, Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf has come home. His plan is to run for office and reclaim political influence, but death threats and legal battles complicate his return.

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The Two-Way
12:58 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

100 Hours On The Supreme Court's Sidewalk: Camping Out For A Seat To History

More than two dozen people bundled up to camp out before the U.S. Supreme Court for a seat to watch oral arguments in a same-sex marriage case on Tuesday.
Elise Hu NPR

Overnight temperatures are dipping below freezing and the forecast calls for snow, but cold, boredom and discomfort haven't stopped more than 30 Supreme Court die-hards from camping out for a seat to history.

"I just really wanted to be part of this moment, so I had been planning to come down for months," said Darienn Powers, a college student who came to Washington from New York. "No matter what, it's worth it to be in there and really experience what's going on."

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Sun March 24, 2013

U.K. Police Investigate Death Of Exiled Russian Oligarch

Russian tycoon Boris Berezovsky talks to the media on Aug. 31, 2012, after losing his case against Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich in London. Berezovsky was found Saturday dead at his home in Britain.
Sang Tan AP

Boris Berezovsky, the Russian oligarch who made headlines in 2000 after falling out with President Vladimir Putin and moving to the U.K., was found dead at his home on Saturday. He was 67.

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The Salt
9:59 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Backyard Chickens: Cute, Trendy Spreaders Of Salmonella

Backyard chickens can be a great hobby. They can also spread disease.
iStockphoto.com

Backyard chickens have become a coveted suburban accessory, one that packages cuteness, convenience and local food production in one fluffy feathered package.

But animal husbandry can be a nasty business, a fact that's often glossed over by poultry partisans like Martha Stewart and New Yorker writer Susan Orlean.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Syrian Opposition Leader Resigns In Frustration

Ahmed Moaz al-Khatib took on the presidency of the Syrian National Council after it was formed in November.
AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 1:55 pm

Update at 3:52 p.m. ET.: Kerry Reacts

Speaking in Baghdad, Secretary of State John Kerry responded to news of Khatib's resignation, saying it "is not a surprise."

"It's almost inevitable, in the transition of a group such as the opposition, for these kinds of changes to take place as it evolves," he said.

Here's more from his comments:

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The Picture Show
7:34 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Drawing Artistic Inspiration From C-SPAN's Talking Heads

(Left to right) Sketches of Henry Kissinger, Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama
Courtesy of Michael McCutcheon

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 11:49 am

A few months ago, Reid Cherlin, a GQ magazine contributor and former White House spokesman for President Obama, was sent a link to a website with what he says was "a sort of grotesque sketch" of his face.

It was the website of Michael McCutcheon, a 73-year-old retiree who draws sketches of all of the guests on C-SPAN's morning programming. Cherlin was a guest on C-SPAN last year, a pretty normal thing for D.C. pundits.

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Sports
6:05 am
Sun March 24, 2013

On Scraping By And The Close-Game Science

In the NCAA men's basketball tournament Saturday, Marquette escaped with a 2-point win over Butler. What does it take to win a close game? Grit and determination? Luck? Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca, who was at the game.

The Two-Way
5:43 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Secretary Of State Kerry In Baghdad, With Concern Over Syria

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Baghdad Sunday on an unannounced visit following President Obama's Mideast tour.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 11:46 am

Secretary of State John Kerry is on an unannounced trip to Baghdad Sunday, and according to an official, the buzzword of the trip is "engagement."

NPR's Michele Kelemen, who's traveling with Kerry, tells our Newscast Desk that Syria is on his agenda:

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PG-13: Risky Reads
4:05 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Beyond Teen Spirit: Learning From Kurt Cobain's Mistakes

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:00 am

Nicole J. Georges' latest book is Calling Dr. Laura.

My mother picked me up from school in early April 1994. I was barely a teenager, lips stretched over braces as I focused my attention on the radio dial, seeking an alternative station when my mom delivered some news: "Oh, your buddy died."

"Who is 'my buddy?' "

"Uhhh ... whatshisname ... the screaming, you know, the blonde. ..."

She was talking about Kurt Cobain.

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Arts & Life
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Where To Sit To Keep A Big Dinner Interesting

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here's a scenario you have probably faced.

ALEX CORNELL: Sometimes you go to dinner with a lot of people you know, but then there's some friends from out of town and you end up sitting next to the, you know, the roommate of the friend who doesn't know anyone...

MARTIN: Who you're never going to see again.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Finding The Answers Within

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

On-air challenge: You'll be given clues for some five-letter words. In each case, the letters of the answer can be found consecutively somewhere inside the clue. For example, given "Some teenagers' language," the answer would be "slang"(hidden inside "teenagerS' LANGuage").

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Author Interviews
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Love, Roughhousing And Fifth Position In 'Brothers Emanuel'

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 7:40 am

The brothers in the Emanuel family are known for their success and for their chutzpah. The youngest is Ari Emanuel, a high-powered Hollywood agent. The HBO show Entourage actually based a character on Ari, and that character is a bit, well, blunt — threatening, for example, to rip out someone's tongue and serve it to his son's pet lizard.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Former Bush Aide Pushes 'Conservative Case' For Gay Marriage

Ken Mehlman, then chairman of the Republican National Committee, speaks during a meeting at the Capitol Hilton in January 2006 in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

One hundred thirty-one prominent Republicans have signed a pro-same-sex marriage legal brief that is clearly at odds with the House GOP leadership and the party's platform in the most recent election. Because of the prominence of the signers, the brief stands out among the more than 150 friend-of-the-court briefs filed in two same-sex marriage cases to be argued at the U.S. Supreme Court this week.

The man who rounded up the group is Ken Mehlman, the former political director for the George W. Bush White House.

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Asia
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Musharraf Returns To Pakistan Amid Threats

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 3:59 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pakistan's former military ruler Pervez Musharraf has returned home after four years of self-imposed exile in Dubai and London. Security was unusually tight as he arrived at Karachi Airport today. The Pakistani Taliban has issued threats to kill the former president. And a Pakistani court has named Musharraf for possible involvement in the 2007 assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. Joining us now from Islamabad is NPR's Julie McCarthy. Hi, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Hi.

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Europe
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

New Bells Chime With Modern Pitch At Notre Dame Cathedral

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:15 am

For its 850th anniversary, Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris is getting new bells. Nearly all of its bells date from an 1856 renovation. Experts say the 19th century bells toll off key. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports the new bells will join one original bell, known as Emmanuel, which remains in the south tower.

Middle East
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Kerry Lands In Baghdad With Syria In Mind

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 6:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry touched down in Baghdad today on an unannounced trip 10 years after the U.S.-led invasion toppled Saddam Hussein. U.S. troops have left but there's plenty for the top U.S. diplomat to do. NPR's Michele Kelemen is traveling with Secretary Kerry. She joins us. Michele, why take this trip now?

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Religion
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

For Evangelical Leader, Gay Marriage 'Outside Of God's Design'

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 11:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

This week, the Supreme Court begins hearing arguments in two cases that could determine the future of gay marriage in this country. In a few moments, NPR's Nina Totenberg brings us the story of a prominent Republican from the George W. Bush administration who's now working against many in his own party to legalize gay marriage.

But first, another point of view from one of the country's leading evangelical Christian leaders.

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Law
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Parent Navigates Personal Grief In Broader Gun Debate

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 6:05 am

Tom Mauser's son, Daniel, was killed at Columbine High School in 1999. Mauser, who has been an outspoken advocate for gun control since then, speaks with host Rachel Martin.

U.S.
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

New York Ads Resurrect Stereotypes For Former Teen Mom

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 2:15 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

GLORIA MALONE: I was a teen mother. I must identify myself as a teen mom. And before I got pregnant, I was honors and AP student. I was involved in the chorus and drama. I was starting to run on the track team. So in every sense, I was the, quote-unquote, person that teenage pregnancy doesn't happen to.

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Law
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Weighing The Effect Of Colorado's New Gun Laws

The state of Colorado passed three new gun measures this past week, going above and beyond federal law. Republicans have said the new laws infringe on the rights of gun owners. But at a signing ceremony last week, Democrats said the new laws would save lives.

Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
3:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

Battling Suicide In A 'Gun State' Means Treading Carefully

In Wyoming, a gun is used in about three-quarters of all suicides. Nationally, guns are used about 50 percent of the time.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 3:58 pm

Wyoming has the highest per capita suicide rate in the nation. Guns are also a big part of everyday life: The state has one of the highest rates of gun ownership.

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The Two-Way
2:37 am
Sun March 24, 2013

No. 1 Gonzaga's Been Dumped: Here's What Else You Should Know

Carl Hall No. 22 of the Wichita State Shockers dunks the ball in the first half while taking on the Gonzaga Bulldogs during the third round of the NCAA men's basketball tournament in Salt Lake City Saturday.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 5:54 am

Saturday's NCAA men's basketball shocker? Wichita State toppled Gonzaga, 76-70. Gonzaga is the first top-seeded team to be eliminated, and it's the first time Wichita State is heading to Sweet 16 since 2006, The Associated Press reports. The AP adds:

"Wichita State had the Zags down 13 early. Though Gonzaga (32-3) fought back, the barrage of 3s was too much for the small school from Spokane, Wash."

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Buried In Grain
10:03 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

Documents: Investigating A Grain Bin Accident

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 4:54 am

Explore the documents from the 2010 Mount Carroll, Ill., incident that describe what happened when two young employees died inside a grain bin and detail workplace safety violations found by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Buried In Grain
10:03 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

Fines Slashed In Grain Bin Entrapment Deaths

Friends and classmates of Wyatt Whitebread, Alex Pacas and Will Piper watch as rescuers work to free the boys from the bin (center) full of thousands of bushels of corn. Only Piper survived.
Alex T. Paschal AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 3:58 pm

The night before he died, Wyatt Whitebread couldn't stand the thought of going back to the grain bins on the edge of Mount Carroll, Ill.

The mischievous and popular 14-year-old had been excited about his first real job, he told Lisa Jones, the mother of some of his closest friends, as she drove him home from a night out for pizza. But nearly two weeks later he told her he was tired of being sent into massive storage bins clogged with corn.

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Buried In Grain
10:03 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

Should Grain Bins On Farms Be Regulated, Too?

Two young workers died in flowing corn at this commercial grain storage complex in Mount Carroll, Ill., in 2010. OSHA regulates 13,000 commercial grain bins like these. But grain bins on 300,000 family farms are largely exempt from OSHA regulations.
John W. Poole NPR

The commercial grain industry responded to a record number of grain entrapments and deaths in 2010 with more safety videos, publications and training programs.

"Have tragic incidents still happened? Yes," says Jeff Adkisson, who heads the Grain and Feed Association of Illinois. "Are we working to reduce them further? Absolutely."

Randy Gordon, president of the National Grain and Feed Association, sees no need for additional regulations. "The [occupational safety and health] standards, we think, are very adequate to address this danger," he says.

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