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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Sat April 27, 2013

Boylston Street Businesses Get Patrons, Loan Offer In Boston

People walk and eat along Boylston Street, near the site of the Boston Marathon bombings, on Wednesday. Businesses in the area have reported strong customer support; they also have an option for federal loans to help them cope with losses.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 3:55 pm

Faced with sharp financial losses stemming from the Boston Marathon bombing attack and the days of forced closure that followed, businesses in the affected Copley Square area can apply for federal help, the Small Business Administration announced Friday.

The news comes as people continue to flock to Boylston Street, to pay their respects to victims of the April 15 attacks and to support stores and restaurants that were open for the first Saturday since the bombings and the ensuing manhunt.

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The Two-Way
11:19 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Iraq's Sunnis Form Tribal Army, As Sectarian Violence Builds

Iraqi anti-government gunmen from Sunni tribes in western Anbar province march during a protest in Ramadi, west of Baghdad, Friday.
Azhar Shallal AFP/Getty Images

Sectarian tensions are fueling violence and protests in Iraq, where more than 170 people have been killed since Tuesday, when government forces clashed with Sunni Muslim protesters at a demonstration camp in Hawija, near Kirkuk.

That incident left at least 23 dead, outraged Iraq's Sunni minority, and stoked fears among some Iraqis that their country is heading for a new civil war. Several deadly attacks have been staged on Iraqi soldiers and police this week.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Sat April 27, 2013

U.S. Citizen Faces Trial In North Korea

North Korea has accused an American tourist of committing crimes against the state and trying to bring down the country's regime, according to the North's official news agency.

The KCNA said Saturday that 44-year-old Kenneth Bae, imprisoned since November, confessed to the crimes and would be facing judgement in a North Korean court. He is identified in the report by his Korean name, Pae Jun Ho.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:22 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Who's Carl This Time?

Transcript

CARL KASSELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kassell. And here's your host, from the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thanks everybody. Thank you. We have got a really fun show for you today. We have actor and one-time Obama adminstration member, now game show host Kal Penn will be joining us later. I'll ask him how it feels to finally hit the big time.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:22 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Limericks

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Or click the Contact Us link on our website, waitwait.npr.org.

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The Salt
9:53 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Don't Call It 'Turkish' Coffee, Unless, Of Course, It Is

Throughout the region that was once the Ottoman empire, people make coffee pretty much the same way: using coffee beans ground into a fine powder, then boiled in a little brass pot that the Turks call a cezve.
maxpax/via Flickr

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:46 pm

When I was in Istanbul in March, I stopped by a tiny cafe called Mandabatmaz, near Taksim Square. Ten Bulgarian tourists were inside, waiting for demitasses of rich, strong coffee "so thick even a water buffalo wouldn't sink in it," according to a translation of the cafe's name.

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The Two-Way
9:17 am
Sat April 27, 2013

New Arrest Reported In Connection To Ricin Letters Case

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 4:13 am

Federal agents who are investigating poison-laced letters that were sent to President Obama and others have arrested Everett Dutschke, of Tupelo, Miss. The Daily Journal of Tupelo reports that the arrest occurred around 1 a.m. Saturday.

In addition to the president, letters containing the poison ricin were sent to Sen. Roger Wicker and a Mississippi state judge.

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET. Charges Filed, Court Date Set

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The Two-Way
9:14 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Several Arrests In Deadly Bangladesh Factory Collapse

Rescue workers evacuate a survivor found in the garment factory building that collapsed Wednesday in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Sat., April 27, 2013.
Ismail Ferdous AP

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 2:36 pm

Bangladeshi authorities have arrested at least seven people in connection with this week's deadly building collapse outside Dhaka, the capital. Several garment factories, shops and a bank were housed inside.

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It's All Politics
9:07 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Plan Would Force Public Companies To Reveal Political Giving

iStockphoto.com

The 2012 election was the most expensive in history, but there remain some gaping holes in our knowledge about who paid for what. The Securities and Exchange Commission is considering a proposal to add more transparency in future elections, but it won't happen without a fight.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sat April 27, 2013

$600K For A Cup Of Coffee: Apple's Cook Is A Hit At Auction

A Lot Of Beans: A charity auction of a cup of coffee with Apple CEO Tim Cook has garnered bids topping $600,000. In this file photo, a pot of beans sits in a Starbucks store.
Sajjad Hussain AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:21 pm

The bidding hasn't closed yet, but a charity auction of a cup of coffee shared with Apple CEO Tim Cook has already attracted offers of more than $600,000 — more than 10 times its estimated value of $50,000. Cook is one of several celebrities taking part in the auction, which benefits the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.

The coffee klatch, currently valued at $605,000, will take place at Apple's headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. And the price may rise even higher — the auction closes on Tues., May 14.

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Fresh Air Weekend
7:13 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: David Sedaris And Matthew Weiner

Mad Men's sixth season, which premiered April 7, revolves around (from left) Henry Francis (Christopher Stanley), Bobby Draper (Mason Vale Cotton), Betty Francis (January Jones), Gene Draper (Evan and Ryder Londo), Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka), Megan Draper (Jessica Pare) and Don Draper (Jon Hamm).
Frank Ockenfels AMC

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 10:21 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
6:47 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Taliban Says It Will Begin Spring Offensive Sunday

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 1:06 am

The Taliban will launch their annual spring offensive on Sun., April 28, the group said Saturday.

In a press release, the Taliban said that the offensive will target "America, NATO and their backers for the gratification of Allah Almighty, independence of Afghanistan and establishing in it an Islamic government while we humbly raise our hands towards Allah Almighty for its success and hope for a favorable and triumphant end."

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Just In Time For Poetry Month, Four Fantastic Books Of Verse

Andreas Rentz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 7:52 am

April is National Poetry Month, and what better way to celebrate than with new poetry releases? Here are four of this month's highlights — a new translation, a "best of" collection, a "collected works" worth revisiting and a camera-eye view of the world.

The Divine Comedy

The season premiere of Mad Men opened with John Ciardi's 1954 translation of Dante's Inferno:

Midway in our life's journey, I went astray
from the straight road and woke to find myself
alone in a dark wood.

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Arts & Life
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Poet Kazim Ali On Poetry In Everyday Life

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

April is National Poetry Month. And throughout the month, WEEKEND EDITION is speaking with younger poets about the importance of poetry in daily life. This morning, we hear from translator and poet Kazim Ali.

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Author Interviews
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Siblings, Seafarers And 'Secrets' In Moviemaker's Novel

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Brendan, Cordelia and Eleanor Walker were suspicious from the first. They may be young — Cordelia is 15, Brendan is 12 and Eleanor is 8 — but they have enough worldly experience to know that when a real estate agent says a place is charming and rustic, she means that it's small and has wild bears in the backyard. So when the siblings first hear about the house at 28 Sea Cliff Avenue in San Francisco, they're skeptical. And their caution is quite warranted; the Kristoff House, as it's called, turns out to hold secrets, magic, skeleton pirates and a behemoth who looks like Mick Jagger.

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Theater
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

When Tonys Tap Faves, Look For These Names

Tom Hanks is one to watch at Tuesday's Tony nominations; he's making his Broadway debut in Norah Ephron's final play, Lucky Guy.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 4:42 pm

Nominations for the Tony Awards, Broadway's annual honors, will be announced April 30. Among the shows eligible: loud London transplants like Matilda the Musical, a new play by David Mamet, a revival of David Mamet, two revivals of Clifford Odets and a revival of the '70s musical Pippin.

Lots of Hollywood stars have made the trek to Broadway this season, ranging from Scarlett Johansson in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof to Tom Hanks in Norah Ephron's last play, Lucky Guy.

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Author Interviews
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

'Country Girl' Edna O'Brien On A Lifetime Of Lit, Loneliness And Love

Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

When Edna O'Brien wrote The Country Girls in 1960, the book was acclaimed by critics, banned by the Irish Censorship Board and burned in churches for suggesting that the two small-town girls at the center of the book had romantic lives. Oh, why be obscure? Sex lives.

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World
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Bombing Suspects' Chechen Roots Weigh Heavy On Nation' Refugees

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 3:01 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Tsarnaev brothers are among tens of thousands of Chechens whose families have sought asylum abroad after two brutal wars with Russia. About 10 percent of the entire Chechen population now lives in Europe. France has one of the largest communities. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley spoke with Chechens in Paris to see how they're reacting to the attack in Boston.

AICHAT: (Foreign language spoken)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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Around the Nation
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

At Bush Library, A Chance To Become The Decider In Chief

President George W. Bush leads his National Security Council in the Situation Room of the White House on Oct. 12, 2001. At the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, this Situation Room has been rebuilt with the original furnishings.
The White House Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:12 pm

The Situation Room is one of the most mysterious and important rooms in the White House. It's where Lyndon Johnson made decisions about the Vietnam War; where Bill Clinton learned about the bombing of the USS Cole; and where George W. Bush gave the order to begin the Iraq War.

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Around the Nation
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Gathering Of Presidential Lineage Celebrates U.S. History

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Descendents of famous American political figures, both Democrats and Republicans, white and black, coming together in a small Ozarks town this weekend. The Missouri Cherry Blossom Festival in Marshfield is hosting the descendents of more than 30 past presidents, including relatives of the country's founding fathers and one of the country's most famous slaves.

From member station KSMU, Jennifer Davidson reports.

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Around the Nation
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Cambodian Americans Celebrate New Year, But Honor Grim History

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Today in Long Beach, California, Cambodian-Americans are celebrating their new year with traditional foods, dance and songs. But the festivities also coincide with the anniversary of the Cambodian genocide. During the Khmer Rouge's reign of terror between 1975 and 1979, cities were emptied and nearly one-fourth of the population was executed, starved or worked to death. Doualy Xaykaothao reports.

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Commentary
4:48 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Athlete Brings New Meaning To 'Taking One For The Team'

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:43 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Does Syria's Alleged Use Of Chemical weapons 'Cross The Line?'

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. This week the calls for U.S. intervention in the Syrian civil war got a bit louder. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told reporters that U.S. intelligence sources now believe with, quote, varying degrees of confidence that the Assad regime has used chemical weapons in Syria.

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NPR Story
4:43 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Congress Acts On Flight Delays, What's Next?

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The first great sequester showdown has ended and the White House says President Obama will sign a bill that effectively ends furloughs for air traffic controllers. The House yesterday approved the measure, which was passed by the Senate Thursday night, and the action comes after a week of flight delays that angered air travelers and set off a flurry of finger-pointing in Washington, D.C. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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NPR Story
4:43 am
Sat April 27, 2013

George Jones: Remembering One Of Country Music's Greats

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Author Interviews
3:04 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Through Art And Industry, Chicago Shaped America

The term "third coast" refers to American cities that sit on the Great Lakes shoreline, like Chicago.
Jeff Haynes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 7, 2013 8:16 am

After World War II, America became a superpower. New York experienced a global rise; Los Angeles was sprawling. But in a new book, Thomas Dyja writes that "the most profound aspects of American Modernity grew up out of the flat, prairie land next to Lake Michigan" — Chicago.

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Music Interviews
3:04 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Singing Sisters Reconsider The Everly Brothers

The Chapin Sisters' new tribute album is titled A Date With the Everly Brothers.
Seth Thomas Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

The Chapin Sisters are a critically acclaimed duo, with tinges of folk, country and pop in their songs. For their latest project, Lily and Abigail Chapin looked to another famous set of singing siblings: Don and Phil, The Everly Brothers.

Lily Chapin says the genesis of their new tribute album, A Date with The Everly Brothers, was a creative workaround of sorts. The duo was once a trio featuring another Chapin sister, Jessica; the three siblings grew up singing three-part harmonies together. Several years ago, Jessica left the group to start a family.

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Bloomberg Aims His Money At Gun Control Opponents

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at a news conference at City Hall on April 25. The billionaire mayor has been spending from his personal fortune to provide a "political counterweight to the NRA," his policy adviser says.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 1:57 pm

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg seems determined to become the formidable adversary the National Rifle Association has never had.

The billionaire mayor is spending from his personal fortune to help defeat lawmakers who voted against gun control proposals last week and to prop up those who supported the measures.

Bloomberg's first target is a Democratic senator facing a tough fight for re-election in 2014: Mark Pryor of Arkansas.

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Middle East
3:03 am
Sat April 27, 2013

Egyptian Activists: Our Religion Is None Of Your Business

Egyptian Christians gather around four coffins during a funeral service at the Saint Mark Coptic cathedral in Cairo on April 7. Religious violence this month has killed three Muslims and at least six Christians.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Sat April 27, 2013 6:17 pm

Since Egypt's revolution began, tensions among Egypt's Muslims and Christians have only increased. Earlier this month, it once again turned deadly. Tit-for-tat killings left three Muslims and at least six Christians dead.

That and other religious violence is prompting a public debate about religious identity in Egypt. One group of young Egyptians wants to remove religious labels from national ID cards.

'Where The Trouble Starts'

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