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The Two-Way
7:31 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Manti Te'o: Story Attributed To Parents Hard To Reconcile With Hoax Report

Manti T'eo.
Jonathan Daniel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:53 pm

If you're trying to make sense of the news that Notre Dame football star Manti Te'o now says he was the victim of a hoax and that the woman he thought was his "girlfriend" never existed and never died, you'll want to read an Oct. 12 story published by the South Bend Tribune.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Jobless Claims At Five-Year Low; Home Building Hit Five-Year High In 2012

Going up in Chicago: Row houses under construction.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:53 pm

There were 335,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, down 37,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

That's the lowest total for any one week since January 2008.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Electric Bikes Make Auto Show Appearance

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Walk a street in Beijing and you'll likely hear a whirring noise as an electric bicycle glides past. They're common in China. One auto maker wants to make them more common here. The makers of tiny Smart cars put an electric bike on display at the Detroit Auto Show. People at that show can also find bikes with pedals, like the Toyota Prius-branded bike.

Around the Nation
5:43 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Michigan Man Reels In Giant Goldfish

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. I have goldfish. They're small. On the other hand, my goldfish don't live in a lake, or at least one has gotten very, very big.

Fishing at Lake St. Claire, Michigan last weekend, Mark Martin reeled in a goldfish big enough to mount on his wall. Most likely dumped by a former owner, it weighed more than three pounds and is nearly 15 inches long. It might be a record catch, if Michigan kept records on goldfish.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:23 am
Thu January 17, 2013

In Algeria: Some Hostages May Have Escaped

Algerian men look at national newspapers headlining the terrorist attack and kidnapping in Amenas at a news stand in Algiers on Thursday.
Ouahab Hebbat AP

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 2:57 pm

Events are happening quickly at the gas facility in eastern Algeria where Islamist militants seized a large group of hostages — perhaps as many as 41 of them foreigners who apparently include some Americans — on Wednesday.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu January 17, 2013

New World, Old Evil In Tracy Chevalier's 'Runaway'

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 7:35 pm

Tracy Chevalier's 1999 masterpiece, Girl with a Pearl Earring, was a tour de force, revealing the painter Vermeer through the eyes of his 16-year-old maid. A publishing sensation, the novel set the pattern for Chevalier's subsequent work: meticulously researched historical fiction, filled with gritty detail yet rendered in luminous prose.

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Business
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

How Is The Housing Industry's Recovery Faring?

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Federal Reserve, yesterday, released its latest snapshot of the state of the U.S. economy. Retail and auto sales were up slightly over the year before, as was activity in the all important housing sector. Real estate sales were seen as steady or improved across much of the country.

For more on housing prices and economic recovery, we turn this morning, as we often do, to David Wessel. He's economics editor of The Wall Street Journal. Good morning.

DAVID WESSEL: Good morning, Renee.

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Business
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

New Rules Issued For Mortgage Servicing Companies

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Consumer Protection Financial Bureau is unveiling today the second half of its new mortgage rules. It will outline how the mortgage industry must manage loans that are delinquent or in the process of being foreclosed.

NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports that these rules, among other things, aim to make it easier for borrowers to communicate with the people handling their mortgages.

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Business
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Gun Makers Worry Revamped Laws Will Hurt Bottom Line

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 1:15 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

You heard the president acknowledge that in some parts of the country - and more specifically, some congressional districts - gun ownership is stronger than in other parts of the country. He would need allies in those places to overcome or persuade the gun industry and its lobbying groups. Industry officials are ready to fight.

As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, some of the proposals, especially a ban on assault weapons, could take a bite out of gun-makers' revenue.

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Business
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with another ominous sign from Europe.

We've told you, in recent days, how car sales in the United States have really surged as people finally had some money to spend or finally made a long delayed purchase.

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Business
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: outsourcing.

When an American-based company noticed that somebody had been logging onto their computer system from China, day after day, they worried it was hackers so they called in some telecom risk experts from Verizon.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And what they discovered was surprising. The activity from China was all being done with the logon of one of the firms' top software developers. Turns out the unnamed employee was outsourcing his job to several Chinese consulting companies.

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Africa
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Mali Update

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In West Africa, the push to prevent militant Islamists from expanding beyond their base in northern Mali is shifting into a ground war. French and Malian troops are now directly engaging al-Qaida linked rebels in combat. They've surrounded a desert village that jihadists overran when they began pushing south toward Mali's capital. This escalates the battle that began last week, when France sent in fighter jets to attack the rebels.

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Africa
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Algeria Update

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 12:05 pm

In southern Algeria, Islamist militants are holding scores of Western hostages who were kidnapped from an oil refinery. The militants say the kidnappings are in retaliation for French intervention in the Mali crisis.

Around the Nation
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

FBI Arrests Dozens In Garbage Pickup Case

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news. Thirty-two people from New York and New Jersey are charged with using threats of violence to control garbage pickup routes.

Authorities say many have ties to the mob, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Organized crime has a long history of infiltrating the trash collection business in New York and New Jersey. It's also the official family business of America's most famous TV gangster, Tony Soprano.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE SOPRANOS")

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Author Interviews
3:37 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Part 2: 'Conscious Capitalism'

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Steve Inskeep continues his conversation with Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, who in 2009 denounced President Obama's proposed health care law. Mackey's new book is Conscious Capitalism.

NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Obama Calls On Congress To Act To Reduce Gun Violence

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama says he's done what he could on his own. Yesterday he signed 23 executive orders related to gun control. They will allow federal agencies to strengthen the existing background check system and improve the tracking of stolen guns. The big ticket items, like universal background checks and a ban on assault weapons and high capacity clips, will need congressional action.

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NPR Story
3:27 am
Thu January 17, 2013

FAA Grounds Boeing's New Jetliner In The U.S.

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Still more trouble for Boeing's newest passenger jet, the 787, known as the Dreamliner. The FAA has grounded all U.S.-owned 787s because of safety concerns. This follows an earlier move by Japan doing the same. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports for today's Business Bottom Line.

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Shots - Health News
1:48 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Bad Flu Season Overshadows Other Winter Miseries

People line up at a Duane Reade pharmacy in New York behind a sign announcing the recent flu outbreak.
Andrew Kelly Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Dr. Beth Zeeman says she can spot a case of influenza from 20 paces. It's not like a common cold.

"People think they've had the flu when they've had colds," Zeeman, an emergency room specialist at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, Mass., tells Shots. "People use the word 'flu' for everything. But having influenza is really a different thing. It hits you like a ton of bricks."

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Losing Our Religion
1:46 am
Thu January 17, 2013

On Religion, Some Young People Show Both Doubt And Respect

NPR's David Greene leads a discussion about religion with a group of young adults at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington, D.C.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

This is the second of a two-part discussion. Read Part 1.

A third of young adults in this country say they don't identify with any organized religion. NPR's David Greene wanted to understand why, so he met with a group of men and women in their 20s and 30s, all of whom have struggled with the role of faith and religion in their lives.

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Losing Our Religion
1:46 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Making Marriage Work When Only One Spouse Believes In God

Peyer says that even though she and her husband believe different things when it comes to God, they have found ways to accept and support each other's beliefs.
Leah Nash for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

Maria Peyer and Mike Bixby are one of those couples who just seem made for each other. They hold hands when they sit and talk. They're happy to spend the morning cooking brunch with their children in their home in southern Washington.

Bixby and Peyer have known each other since they were young, but got married only a few years ago.

"It just hadn't been the right time, until it was. God bless Facebook," says Peyer.

"She Facebooked me, and asked if I remembered her, and then it just went from there," Bixby says.

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Theater
1:45 am
Thu January 17, 2013

A Cooler Roof For A New 'Cat'

In Rob Ashford's new production of the classic play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Scarlett Johansson plays an earthier version of restless sex kitten Maggie.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:11 am

There are certain classic American plays that are revived on Broadway every decade or so, to let a new generation of actors and audiences discover them. Tennessee Williams' 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, running through March 30, is one of those iconic plays.

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Shots - Health News
4:53 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Schedule Of Childhood Vaccines Declared Safe

Some parents have worried that kids get too many vaccinations too quickly. A review of all the available research suggests those concerns are misplaced.
Dmitry Naumov iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

Childhood vaccines for diseases like measles, polio and whooping cough have repeatedly been proved safe and effective. Even so, some parents still worry that the schedule of vaccinations — 24 immunizations by the age of 2 — can be dangerous. That worry is likely misplaced, according to a yearlong review of all available scientific data.

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The Salt
4:29 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Jihadi Fighters Win Hearts And Minds By Easing Syria's Bread Crisis

A man makes bread as residents, background, stand in line in front of a bakery during heavy fighting between Free Syrian Army fighters and government forces in Aleppo, Syria, on Dec. 4, 2012.
Narciso Contreras Associated Press

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

In Syria, the staple of most meals is a thin, round, flat bread that we would probably call pita.

Back in November, as fierce fighting raged across Syria, people started to run out of this bread. Government forces were attacking bakeries in rebel-held areas and cutting off electricity so mills couldn't grind flour. By late last year, Syrians were desperate.

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U.S.
4:26 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Violence-Riddled Chicago Hopes Gun Proposals Will Help Shield It

Community leaders and family members of murder victims attend a press conference Jan. 3 at St. Sabina Church in Chicago to make a plea for stronger gun regulations.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

As President Obama unveiled his gun control proposals Wednesday, he highlighted mass shootings at schools in Colorado, Virginia and Connecticut. He also mentioned another group of children, not in school — the ones on the street corners of Chicago.

Chicagoan Annette Holt was at the White House during Obama's address. Her teenage son, Blair, was shot to death five years ago on a Chicago bus as he shielded a fellow student from a spray of bullets.

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Politics
4:00 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Interior Secretary's Legacy Defined By Issues Of Oil

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar speaks at the dedication for the Southwest's first urban wildlife refuge on the southern edge of Albuquerque, N.M., on Sept. 27, 2012. Salazar has announced that he'll leave his post in late March and return to Colorado.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

The Department of the Interior is huge — more than 70,000 employees manage a half-billion acres of public land, mostly in the West. The department does everything from operate national parks to administer Native American social programs and manage wild horses.

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Manti Te'o Girlfriend Story Was A Hoax; Linebacker Says He Was Taken In

The sports website Deadspin says the story of Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o losing a girlfriend to leukemia is a hoax.
Mike Ehrmann Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 7:35 am

Manti Te'o, the Notre Dame linebacker who nearly won the Heisman Trophy this season, is at the center of what Deadspin reports is a "hoax," in which the story of a girlfriend — and her tragic death — was fabricated. The site is questioning the existence of a girl Te'o has said inspired him to new heights. We'll update this post with new information as it emerges.

Update at 9 p.m. Notre Dame News Conference

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It's All Politics
3:57 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

The Decades-Old Gun Ban That's Still On The Books

Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officer Jay Phillippi looks over a fully automatic Thompson machine gun that was turned in during a "Gifts for Guns" program in Compton, Calif., in 2005.
Chris Carlson AP

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

When President Obama laid out his proposals Wednesday to reduce gun violence, he included a call for Congress to ban "military-style assault weapons."

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Media
3:57 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Oprah Interview Adds To Armstrong's Complicated Media History

Lance Armstrong speaks at a press conference of the 100th Milan-San Remo Cycle Race on March 20, 2009.
Vittorio Zunino Celotto Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

After a career of alternately charming, manipulating and strong-arming the media, former cycling champion Lance Armstrong is turning for redemption to a televised interview with Oprah Winfrey.

Winfrey has said viewers of her talk show on her cable channel OWN on Thursday and Friday nights will witness Armstrong confess that he cheated. But, she warned that people will be surprised in the way in which he confesses.

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Politics
3:11 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

N.Y. Rep. McCarthy: 'We Have To Break The Myth Of The NRA'

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. If there is even one life that can be saved, then we've got an obligation to try - those words today from President Obama, as he unveiled a far-reaching package of new gun control measures. They fall into two categories: those that require congressional approval, and those that don't.

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Business
3:11 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Troubles Continue For 787 Dreamliner With Groundings In Japan

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 5:16 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

There are new and bigger troubles today for the Boeing 787, the airplane known as the Dreamliner. Late today, the FAA grounded the U.S. fleet of 787s for safety checks. The grounding and inspection order will likely be implemented around the world. The move comes after two serious battery-related problems occurred on two different Dreamliners in the past 10 days. Here's NPR's Wendy Kaufman.

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