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The Two-Way
2:11 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Kazakhstan Says It's Cooperating In Marathon Bombing Case

A collection of fireworks that the U.S. Justice Department says were found inside a backpack that belonged to Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 2:20 pm

The government of Kazakhstan says it's cooperating with U.S. officials in the investigation of the Boston Marathon bombings, a day after two men from the Central Asian country were charged in connection with the blasts that killed three people and wounded more than 250.

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Author Interviews
2:05 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Ethical Fashion: Is The Tragedy In Bangladesh A Final Straw?

Casual clothing detail fashion background made in the USA
iStockPhoto.com

A garment factory that manufactures products for international clothing companies collapsed outside of Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month, killing more than 400 workers and injuring scores of others. It came on the heels of a fire at another factory in November 2012; that incident killed 112 workers.

Factories like these in Bangladesh pump out what author Elizabeth Cline calls "fast fashion," or clothes made on the cheap by big chains such as H&M, Zara, Esprit, Lee, Wrangler, Nike, J.C. Penney and Wal-Mart.

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The Salt
1:29 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Can Salmon Farming Be Sustainable? Maybe, If You Head Inland

These sockeye salmon were raised at a land-based fish farm in Langley, British Columbia.
Courtesy Willowfield Enterprises

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 4:43 pm

Is salmon farming ever sustainable?

For years, many marine biologists have argued that the floating, open-ocean net pens that produce billions of pounds of salmon per year also generate pollution, disease and parasites.

In some places in western Canada, the open-ocean salmon farming industry has been blamed for the collapse of wild salmon populations in the early 2000s — though other research has challenged that claim.

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Movie Reviews
1:20 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Peeling Away The Layers In A 'Portrait Of Jason'

Jason Holliday (nee Aaron Payne) is the soloist in front of the camera in Shirley Clarke's seminal 1967 documentary, Portrait of Jason.
Milestone Film

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 1:51 pm

If reality TV has a redeeming value, it's that it teaches you to be suspicious of claims that you're seeing real people doing real things. This is especially so in an age when memoirs bristle with made-up events, and everyone from the Kardashians to the Obamas orchestrate their media coverage. These days, it's hard to tell whether an article, book or TV show is showing you the real person or only a performance.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
1:02 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

SFJAZZ Center Opening Night On JazzSet

Chick Corea (keyboard) joined the SFJAZZ Collective for the closing performance, an arrangement of his piece "Spain."
Scott Chernis Courtesy of SFJAZZ Center

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 2:16 pm

Noodling gloriously, sax men Joe Lovano and Joshua Redman feel their way into the acoustics of a new space with "Blackwell's Message," named for the irresistible drumming of Ed Blackwell, who parlayed his New Orleans parade beat all over the world. Coincidentally, New Orleans' WWOZ is providing the recording crew and a host for a live webcast and broadcast on NPR Music. We have highlights here.

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Code Switch
12:49 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Crunching The Numbers On Blacks' Views On Gays

Jason Collins, a journeyman NBA center, came out as gay this week in the pages of Sports Illustrated.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 5:06 pm

A relatively high-profile black man came out this week. And with it, a hardy old narrative got another moment in the sun.

When Jason Collins, a journeyman NBA center, announced that he was gay, many commentators who applauded his disclosure still nodded to the idea of heightened opposition to gay rights among black people.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Navy Launches Its First Drone Squadron

A photo of the MQ-8B, provided by Northrop Grumman.
Northrop Grumman

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 4:10 am

The U.S. Navy is inaugurating its first squadron that mixes advanced unmanned drones with conventional aircraft.

The maritime strike squadron, nicknamed the "Magicians," will be officially launched at the Naval Air Station North Island on Coronado, near San Diego.

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Africa
12:35 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

With Robocalls, Eritrean Exiles Organize Passive Resistance

Eritrea's President Isaias Afwerki, shown on a visit to Libya in 2010, has been widely criticized by human rights groups. Eritrean exiles have organized passive protests, calling on people to stay home Friday.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 3:27 pm

Tucked in the northeast corner of Africa, Eritrea is one of the most closed societies in the world, so much so that it's sometimes dubbed the "North Korea of Africa."

President Isaias Afwerki does not tolerate any independent media. The Internet is restricted. Reporters without Borders recently named it 179th out of 179 countries for freedom of expression.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi Makes Brief Court Appearance In Libya

Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi, the second son of former Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi, appears in the court in Zintan city, some 150 km southwest of Tripoli.
Zintan Media Office Xinhua /Landov

Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi, who before the revolution in Libya seemed poised to take his father's place as ruler, made a brief court appearance in Zintan today.

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Poetry
12:20 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

'Poems To Learn By Heart': The Merits Of Memorizing Verse

Caroline Kennedy's other works include of A Family of Poems: My Favorite Poetry for Children and A Patriot's Handbook.
Disney Hyperion Books

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 11:17 am

Caroline Kennedy's latest book comes with an agenda: to encourage a return to poetic memorization and recitation that both families and schools once considered routine.

In Poems to Learn by Heart, Kennedy stresses the importance of memorizing poetry and presents a collection of poems that she believes everyone should internalize.

"I think there's something in it for all ages," she tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I realized this shouldn't be just for kids because older people are the ones that are really working on keeping their memories going strong."

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All Songs Considered
12:09 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

We Get Mail: What To Do When You've Burned Out On Your Favorite Music

Listen enough, and you can even grow tired of Jeff Buckley's music. Once burnout sets in, how do you rekindle a musical love?
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:04 pm

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Digital Life
11:58 am
Thu May 2, 2013

A Look Ahead At The Future Of Tech

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:14 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. Technology's already changed our lives in ways we couldn't have imagined just a few years ago, and now seems ready to reinvent our future. As we continue our series of conversations looking ahead, we've invited Farhad Manjoo to join us - he's Slate's technology columnist and a frequent guest on this program - on the latest gadgets, on the business of consumer electronics and on how we've adapted our lives, our jobs and our manners to all these changes.

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Latin America
11:58 am
Thu May 2, 2013

From Arab Spring To Burgeoning Brazil: A Reporter's New Beat

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:10 pm

After years in the Middle East, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro has started the next chapter of her reporting life in Brazil. From her base in Sao Paulo, she'll focus on the country's environmental wealth, efforts to curb crime and the preparation for the World Cup and Olympic Games.

The Checkout: Live
11:40 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Boom Tic Boom: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Allison Miller.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:38 pm

Drummer Allison Miller, a go-to choice for jazz heavies and arena-level singer-songwriters alike, has made time to cultivate her own working band in the past few years. Boom Tic Boom features some of her favorite female instrumentalists in pianist Myra Melford and violinist Jenny Scheinman, as well as a long-running partner-in-crime in bassist Todd Sickafoose, and it interprets her jaunty tunes with plenty of headroom for any onomatopoeia from her percussion palette.

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Massive Spire Lifted To Top Of New WTC Building

The 408-foot spire was hoisted onto a temporary platform at the top of One World Trade Center on Thursday.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:12 pm

Construction workers applauded Thursday as a crane raised the flag-draped spire of One World Trade Center to the top of the skyscraper.

When they install the spire at a later date, it will cap the structure at a symbolic 1,776 feet. The Port Authority says the spire, which acts as a fixture for various antennas, will bump the 104-story building to be the tallest in the Western Hemisphere, reports New Jersey's The Star-Ledger.

However, as the newspaper reports:

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Thu May 2, 2013

'Warren Is In The House,' Buffett Says As He Joins Twitter

Twitter.com/WarrenBuffett

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 11:33 am

Warren Buffett, the billionaire investor known as the "oracle of Omaha" and renowned for making lots of money for both himself and his Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, joined Twitter on Thursday.

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Live At The Village Vanguard
11:22 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Miguel Zenón Quartet: Live At The Village Vanguard

Luis Perdomo.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 2:09 pm

Ever since he started becoming one of the best alto saxophone players in the world, Miguel Zenón has drawn influence from his upbringing in Puerto Rico. Folk melodies, forms and rhythms have inspired many of his technically astounding yet immediately gratifying works. So it makes sense that he's giving back. He's launched an initiative called Caravana Cultural, presenting free jazz concerts and lectures on the island. His latest album Oye!!! was recorded live in San Juan with Puerto Rican musicians.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:53 am
Thu May 2, 2013

What Do You Get Valery Gergiev For His 60th Birthday?

Conductor Valery Gergiev, who turns 60 today.
Marco Borggreve courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 11:03 am

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Thu May 2, 2013

VIDEO: Could Tommy Lasorda Be Any Less Impressed By PSY?

As PSY danced, former Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda (sitting, in the blue shirt) looked on with a quizzical expression.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:42 am

Our guess is that legendary Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda isn't into that whole "Gangnam Style" thing.

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Music
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Black Singer Soars In Hmong Language

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:51 am

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Business
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Overseas Labor Abuses Prompt Business Shutdown

Host Michel Martin talks to Loretta Tofani, who closed her furniture store after discovering poor working conditions at the Chinese factories that supplied her business. She talks about how she made her decision, and about the factory building collapse in Bangladesh.

The Two-Way
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

After Socking The Rockies, Snowstorm Moves East

A snowplow clears slush from the parking lot of Creighton Prep in Omaha, Neb., on Thursday after a spring storm dumped slush and snow on parts of Nebraska and Iowa.
Nati Harnik AP

Arbor Day celebrations have come and gone, but winter weather is gripping the Plains and Upper Midwest. The storm that dumped snow in the Rockies a day earlier is threatening to blanket parts of the region with up to 8 inches of snow on Thursday.

The National Weather Service warns: "Significant accumulations of snow continue to be reported across portions of southeast Minnesota and northeast Iowa, with over 15 inches already in Dodge Center, (Minn.)."

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Africa
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Africa's Jewish Heritage In Cape Verde

You may not know much about the country of Cape Verde; it's a group of islands off the coast of West Africa. But you may be surprised that many Cape Verdeans have Jewish ancestry. Host Michel Martin speaks with Carol Castiel, founder of the Cape Verde Jewish Heritage Project, about efforts to restore Jewish burial grounds in the country.

Race
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Does Italy Have A Racism Problem?

The recent appointment of Italy's first black Cabinet minister was greeted with racist comments from a handful of political leaders. That has raised questions about whether the nation has a broader problem with bias. Host Michel Martin gets the latest from NPR's Sylvia Poggioli.

National Security
9:57 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Interrogations Without Torture

In the aftermath of the Boston bombings, some critics said investigators should have used harsh interrogation techniques with the surviving suspect. Host Michel Martin speaks with counterterrorism expert and former FBI Agent Joe Navarro about how attitudes about torture have evolved, and what really are the most effective ways to interrogate.

The Two-Way
9:39 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Charges Possible In Death Of Ky. 2-Year-Old Shot By Brother

The home in Kentucky's Cumberland County where a 2-year-old girl was shot by her 5-year-old brother with a gun he'd been given as a gift. Investigators say the shooting Tuesday was accidental, but there is a chance some charges might be filed.
Dylan Lovan AP

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:23 am

The heartbreaking death of a 2-year-old Kentucky girl who was shot and killed Tuesday by her 5-year-old brother with a rifle he had been given as a gift might lead to criminal charges.

The Lexington Herald-Leader writes that "Kentucky State Police said Wednesday it is too early to say whether charges will be filed in the case of a 5-year-old boy who accidentally shot and killed his 2-year-old sister."

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The Salt
9:37 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Grocery Home Delivery May Be Greener Than Schlepping To The Store

Amazon Fresh delivery man Tim Wilkie totes food to a house on Mercer Island, Wash.
Joe Nicholson AP

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:20 am

Home grocery delivery sounds like a frill for people too lazy to schlep to the store. But having food delivered can be more environmentally friendly than driving to the store, researchers say.

Having groceries delivered can cut carbon dioxide emissions by at least half, compared to driving to the store, according to a new study. That's because the delivery truck offers the equivalent of a "shared ride" for the food.

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The Two-Way
9:36 am
Thu May 2, 2013

It's A 'Tale Of Two Popes' As Benedict Returns To Vatican

The helicopter carrying Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI lands at the Vatican on Thursday.
Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:08 am

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI moved back to the Vatican and his new retirement residence Thursday, where he will live side by side with the reigning pontiff, Pope Francis.

The arrangement makes history because Benedict, 86, is the first pope to voluntarily step down as head of the Roman Catholic Church in more than 700 years.

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All Songs Considered
8:47 am
Thu May 2, 2013

First Watch: Kurt Vile, 'Never Run Away'

Courtesy of the artist

Kurt Vile is sometimes known as a shredder, which isn't exactly right. His guitar playing is accomplished, but it doesn't blow your hair back so much as wrap it gently in a worn, sun-bleached kerchief.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Send Your Haiku To Mars! NASA Seeks Poets

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took this close-up of the red planet Mars in 2007, when it was just 55 million miles away.
NASA UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 11:33 am

Galactic poet?

Here's how to become famous.

Send your work to Mars!

NASA is raising awareness for its upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft with its Going to Mars project. The MAVEN spacecraft is scheduled for launch this November, to study the Red Planet's upper atmosphere; the craft will examine why Mars lost its atmosphere, and how that catastrophe affected the history of water there.

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