NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
10:53 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Canada Bids Its Penny Goodbye; Should The U.S.?

Canadian pennies. They're not going to be put into circulation anymore.
Fred Greenslade Reuters /Landov

Canada is changing its change.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:33 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Europol Uncovers Match-Fixing Scheme, Questions 'Integrity' Of Football In Europe

The European Union police organization, Europol, uncovered a massive match-fixing scheme that they say presents "a big problem for the integrity of football in Europe."

As the AP reports, the Europol investigation found "more than 380 suspicious matches — including World Cup and European Championship qualifiers and two Champions League games — and found evidence that a Singapore-based crime group is closely involved in match-fixing."

Read more
All Songs Considered
10:32 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Question Of The Week: Which Songs Get You Through The Winter?

Fleet Foxes were among the many artists listeners say they turn to to survive the winter months.
Sean Pecknold

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:26 pm

Read more
Political Junkie
10:18 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Ed Koch, New York City And The Politics Of Resentment And Race

Koch served as mayor for three terms (1978-89).
Ken Rudin collection

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 2:19 pm

For anyone who lived in New York during his tenure — and even if you didn't — Ed Koch was a larger-than-life figure, a feisty, combative and mostly-successful mayor who, for better or worse, dramatically changed the city and left his mark in the history books.

But how will history judge him?

Read more
Music Reviews
10:02 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Yo La Tengo: Decades In And Far From Fading

Yo La Tengo's new album is titled Fade.
Carlie Armstron Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:19 am

Yo La Tengo wouldn't seem to be very rock 'n' roll, given that it's a very stable and long-lasting operation. Since 1991, the lineup has consisted of a married couple — drummer Georgia Hubley and guitarist Ira Kaplan, along with bassist James McNew — and all three play additional instruments as needed. Yo La Tengo has been with the same label, Matador, since 1993. But if the band lacks rock dramatics, I would argue that it knows as much about the modes and manners of rock 'n' roll as anyone who has ever played the music.

Read more
Planet Money
9:43 am
Mon February 4, 2013

A Union Vote For Chinese Workers Who Assemble iPhones

Workers at a Foxconn plant in Shenzhen, China, in 2010.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:12 am

The Chinese workers who assemble iPhones, iPads and tons of other electronic devices may soon be able to elect their own union representatives, the FT reports.

Labor unions technically do exist in Chinese factories, but they're typically controlled by management and the government. So a union run by democratic vote of the workers would be a huge shift.

Read more
Politics
9:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Political Chat: Gun Control And The Senate

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:51 am

The debate over gun control continues to dominate the headlines. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate doubles the number of African-American members by welcoming William 'Mo" Cowan. He replaces John Kerry. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Republican strategist Ron Christie and Keli Goff, political correspondent for The Root.

Music
9:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Kidjo Urges Malian Musicians To Fight Ban

Singer Angelique Kidjo of Benin performs during the opening concert for the soccer World Cup at Orlando stadium in Soweto, South Africa, June 10, 2010.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:17 am

Singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo was born in Benin, West Africa. Today, she lives in New York City and is widely considered Africa's greatest living diva.

For Kidjo, music provides an outlet for both activism and pleasure. "Those two things are part of my stability," she tells NPR's Michel Martin. "I need that. No human being has endless compassion, you need to replenish yourself, and I know that if I didn't have music, I'd go crazy."

Read more
Education
9:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

African Americans Fly High With Math And Science

Barrington Irving , a 23-year-old Jamaican-born pilot, at a news conference at Opa-locka Airport Wednesday, June 27, 2007, ending a three-month journey he said would make him the youngest person to fly around the world alone.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:48 am

This Black History Month, Tell Me More is taking a look at African Americans in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) who are inspiring future generations.

Today, Barrington Irving shares how his sky high dreams became a reality. A chance encounter in his parents' bookstore put him on a path that would make him the youngest person and first African American to fly solo around the world.

Read more
Television
9:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Super Bowl Ads: Winners And Losers

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:51 am

Some people enjoy the Super Bowl commercials more than the football game. Host Michel Martin and Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans run through the best and worst ads; from senior citizens making late night trips to Taco Bell to nerds getting really sloppy kisses.

The Salt
9:27 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart claims that 11 percent of the produce in its stores now comes from local farms.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:21 am

When Wal-Mart calls, Herman Farris always finds whatever the retailer wants, even if it's yucca root in the dead of winter. Farris is a produce broker in Columbia, Mo., who has been buying for Wal-Mart from auctions and farms since the company began carrying fruits and vegetables in the early 1990s.

During the summer and fall, nearly everything Farris delivers is grown in Missouri. That's Wal-Mart's definition of "local" — produce grown and sold in the same state. In winter, it's a bit tougher to source locally.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:16 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Reports: 'American Sniper' Chris Kyle Died While Trying To Help Fellow Veteran

Chris Kyle, retired Navy SEAL and bestselling author of the book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, in April 2012. He was killed Saturday.
Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:56 am

More is being learned today about former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle and the man accused of killing the decorated Iraq War veteran.

Read more
Europe
8:45 am
Mon February 4, 2013

For Greeks, Painful Cuts Keep Tearing At The Social Fabric

Georgia Kolia, 63, has two adult children, both unemployed. She works as a volunteer distributing loaves of bread at the Agia Zonis Orthodox church soup kitchen for the poor in Athens, Greece, in April 2012.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

Greeks are feeling the squeeze. The social repercussions of three years of austerity measures imposed by international lenders are hitting hard. Thousands of businesses have shut down, unemployment is nearly 27 percent and rising, and the once dependable safety net of welfare benefits is being pulled in.

With further cutbacks and tax hikes about to kick in, Greece's social fabric is being torn apart.

Nowhere are cutbacks more visible and painful than in health care.

Read more
The Record
8:41 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The Roots Of Beyonce's Super Bowl Spectacular

Beyonce performs during the Super Bowl halftime show Sunday night.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:38 am

One of the Twitter hashtags devised by rabid Beyonce fans before last night's Super Bowl halftime show was religious in nature: #praisebeysus. Praise Beysus! This bit of hyperventilating resonated in interesting ways. Strutting into the very center of America's biggest television spectacle, the 31-year-old superstar intended to secure her place in the musical pantheon next to recent Super Bowl-approved legends Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen and Prince.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:37 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Experimental Tuberculosis Vaccine Fails To Protect Infants

Nurse Christel Petersen inoculates a child in the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative study in 2011.
Rodger Bosch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:03 pm

Researchers are disappointed in the results of a long-awaited study of the leading candidate vaccine against tuberculosis, one of humankind's most elusive scourges.

But, pointing to more than a dozen other TB vaccines in the pipeline, they say they're not discouraged.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:09 am
Mon February 4, 2013

VIDEO: 'Today You Can See That I'm Alive,' Says Malala, Girl Shot By Taliban

Malala Yousafzai in a video released Monday.
Storyful

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 7:52 am

Read more
Monkey See
6:56 am
Mon February 4, 2013

That Was A Great Blackout Last Night

Kicker David Akers of the San Francisco 49ers waits during a power outage that occurred in the third quarter that caused a 34-minute delay during Super Bowl XLVII.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:38 am

Great blackout last night, right?

It's been clear for some time that substantially more people watch the Super Bowl than have the slightest interest in watching the actual football game. That's why there's such hubbub over the halftime show and the commercials — it gives non-football types something to pay attention to instead of football.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:35 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Lights Out, It Was A Memorable Super Bowl

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs waits on the field after the half the lights went out in the third quarter of Sunday's Super Bowl against the San Francisco 49ers in New Orleans.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:45 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca on the Super Bowl

There was a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.

A last-minute drive that could have won the game for San Francisco.

An MVP performance by Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:33 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Book News: Myanmar Celebrates As Censorship Recedes; And Oh Those Seussian Hats

A sea of Seuss hats at an event at the Library of Congress in 2010.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:56 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:23 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Royal Recovery: Remains ID'd As Those Of King Richard III

An enlarged image of the skull identified as that of King Richard III. Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, is pointing to a detail.
Rui Vieira PA Photos /Landov

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:10 pm

Remains found under what's now a parking lot in the English city of Leicester have been confirmed to be those of King Richard III, researchers at the University of Leicester announced Monday.

Read more
Business
5:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Canadian Government Retires Its Penny

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

The Canadian mint stops distributing pennies on Monday. Canada stopped making one-cent coins last year to cut costs, since each penny cost 1.6 cents to make. Most stores will round out change to the nearest five cents.

Around the Nation
5:08 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Twitter Lit Up When Superdome Lost Power

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you can imagine, Twitter was on fire during the Super Bowl. But the Twitterverse really lit up when the lights went out at the Superdome. Predictably, someone created a Twitter account named SuperBowlLights, and there were tweets like this: Only need half the lights anyway, as only half the teams are playing - that's just mean. Many people tweeted that it must have been Beyonce who knocked out the lights with her electric half-time show

Around the Nation
3:39 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Hostage Situation Weighs On Midland City, Alabama

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

It's been almost a week since the first reports that a man had shot and killed a school bus driver, snatched a five-year-old boy off the bus and is holding him hostage in an underground bunker. Grief and the slow pace of negotiations with the suspect have frayed nerves in the close-knit, rural community.

Business
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the product spots that went viral during the Super Bowl was not seen on television and did not cost millions of dollars.

And that brings us to today's last word in business: Oreo.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Oreo took advantage of last night's stadium blackout to tweet an image of the cookie submerged in darkness with the caption: You Can Still Dunk in the Dark.

Sarah Hofstetter is president of the ad agency 360i.

Read more
Business
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

SodaStream Criticized For West Bank Plant

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 6:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's think about the Super Bowl once again. Last night was big for the Ravens and for an Israeli company called SodaStream. It ran its first Super Bowl ad.

The original spot it hoped to air was rejected. And as NPR's Larry Abramson reports, there are much bigger controversies facing that company.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
Economy
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

U.S., E.U Bilateral Trade Deal 'Is Within Our Reach'

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with talk of a free-trade zone.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: All right. With both sides of the Atlantic suffering economic woes, there is new interest in a free-trade zone between the United States and the European Union.

As Teri Schultz reports, the idea has come up before and hasn't gone anywhere.

Read more
Europe
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Violence At Both Ends Of Political Spectrum Threatens Greece

A protester holds a petrol bomb during clashes with riot police after a demonstration against new austerity measures outside the parliament in Athens, Greece, on Nov. 7.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 6:33 pm

Escalating political violence from both the left and right is raising fears of political instability in debt-burdened Greece. The conservative-led government is cracking down on leftist groups, vowing to restore law and order.

But the opposition says authorities are trying to divert people's attention from growing poverty and despair.

Take the latest explosion in Athens — a firebomb at a crowded suburban mall last month that slightly injured two security guards.

Read more
Middle East
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Syrian Opposition Leader Holds Talks With Russia, Iran

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 6:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Read more
Africa
3:38 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Algerian Militants Wanted To Create 'Giant Fireball'

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 10:09 am

It now appears that the militants who stormed a gas plant in Algeria last month, resulting in the deaths of dozens of hostages, ultimately wanted to create a giant fireball by blowing up the plant. They just couldn't figure out how. David Greene talks to Adam Nossiter of The New York Times, who recently went to the plant and gathered accounts of some former hostages.

Pages