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Middle East
5:23 am
Fri September 6, 2013

White House 'Exhausts' Diplomatic Options On Syria

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A single sentence sums up President Obama's challenge in winning congressional support for a strike on Syria. Congressman Elijah Cummings said it yesterday on NPR's TELL ME MORE.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

REPRESENTATIVE ELIJAH CUMMINGS: Let me tell something. When you've got 97 percent of your constituents saying no, it's kind of hard to say yes.

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Around the Nation
5:21 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

The Two-Way
5:20 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Book News: Sushmita Banerjee, Indian Author Who Fled Taliban, Shot Dead

Author Sushmita Banerjee poses at a 2002 news conference announcing the launch of the movie Escape From Taliban, which is based on her memoir A Kabuliwala's Bengali Wife.
Sebastian D'Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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It's All Politics
5:18 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Q&A: How To Do Political Coverage Better In The Twitter Age

Reporters watch the final minutes of the presidential debate between President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney last October in Denver.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Curious about how social media sped up news cycles, amplified trivial events on the trail and enabled Washington's "worst tendencies" during the 2012 presidential race, one of the nation's top young political reporters decided to take a deeper look.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After Tragedy, Lost Live On In 'Maid's Version' Of The Story

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

For readers new to Daniel Woodrell's work, The Maid's Version is a perfect introduction and an invitation to read more. It's a short book — almost a novella at a mere 164 pages — but there are lifetimes captured here. Woodrell sets the story in his beloved Missouri Ozarks, and he writes with clear-eyed observation, introducing the reader to characters whose lives are shaped as much by their rural landscape as by the moral ambiguities — the collective lies, constraints and collusions — that form the necessary glue holding their community together.

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Around the Nation
4:59 am
Fri September 6, 2013

It Could Soon Be Drone Hunting Season

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

It may soon be drone hunting season. Deer Trail, Colorado, is considering a plan to issue hunting licenses for drones. It's a protest against federal surveillance. And even though the proposal has not passed, the Denver Post says 983 people applied. Now, you'd think the federal government would laugh off this notion that there would ever be a drone over Deer Trail. Instead, officials have warned against shooting them.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
4:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Report: 'Iran Plots Revenge' If U.S. Strikes Syria

A U.S. Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet prepares to launch from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz earlier this week in the Red Sea. The ship is among U.S. military assets in the region.
Nathan R. McDonald UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 7:31 am

"The U.S. has intercepted an order from Iran to militants in Iraq to attack the U.S. Embassy and other American interests in Baghdad in the event of a strike on Syria," The Wall Street Journal reports.

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Parallels
4:39 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Istanbul, Madrid, Tokyo Vie For Olympics, But Is It Worth It?

Fireworks at closing ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:47 am

The International Olympic Committee will decide Saturday on the host of the 2020 Summer Games. Istanbul, Madrid and Tokyo are vying for the honor.

As our reporters noted on Morning Edition, these are all world-class cities with strong selling points, but they also face some serious challenges.

Istanbul

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Middle East
3:22 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Assessing Role Extremists Play In Syrian Opposition

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 9:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All this week, we've been following the debate in Congress, where many question the wisdom of striking Syria. Senator John McCain is a leading voice for doing more, making sure airstrikes and other measures actually help the rebels there.

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Europe
3:20 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Obama Uses G-20 Summit To Gather Support On Syria

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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National Security
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Secretary Napolitano Finishes Up At Homeland Security

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today is Janet Napolitano's last day as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Napolitano is leaving Washington D.C., heading for California, to become at the end of this month, president of the University of California System. NPR's Brian Naylor sat down with Napolitano yesterday for a look back at her tenure as head of one of the government's largest and most complex departments.

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Around the Nation
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Rural County Wants To Secede From California

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk next with a man who wants to secede from his state. The Board of Supervisors of a northern California county voted this week to take their county out of California. Michael Kobseff is one of the supervisors who voted yes in Siskiyou County with an eye to joining other counties in northern California, as well as southern Oregon, to form their own state. He's on the line. Welcome to the program, sir.

MICHAEL KOBSEFF: Thank you.

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Politics
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Primary Election For NYC Comptroller Heats Up

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When Eliot Spitzer, the former governor of New York who quit in disgrace, entered the race for the lower profile job of New York City comptroller, that sleepy contest was suddenly front page news. Many observers started writing political obituaries for Spitzer's opponent. But with just days to go, the race is not too close to call, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Eliot Spitzer is the first to admit he's made a few mistakes.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAMPAIGN AD)

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Parallels
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

India's New Central Banker Steps Into A Perfect Storm

Raghuram Rajan, the new head of the Reserve Bank of India, has his work cut out for him. India's economic growth has crashed, its currency has plunged and prices are up.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:54 pm

Raghuram Rajan, the new governor of India's central bank, swept into office this week infusing a sense of optimism.

He announced hard-headed measures Wednesday that remove uncertainty that has characterized the Reserve Bank of India's moves.

By Friday, Indian equities and the rupee were clawing back.

But analysts say the exuberance — and honeymoon with the suave MIT-trained economist — is unlikely to last.

After decadelong high growth rates, India is now the sick man of Asia.

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Economy
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Fed Watches Friday's Jobless Data For Signs To End Stimulus

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Let's try to figure out what today's unemployment report means. NPR's John Ydstie has been following the story. He's in our studios. John, good morning once again.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: OK. What are the numbers first?

YDSTIE: Well, 169,000 new jobs were added to payrolls in August, according to the government report.

INSKEEP: OK.

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Business
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Bidding War Breaks Out For Small Strip Of Land

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Bidding War.

The real estate market has been heating up in some popular locations - like the Hamptons.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And this week, two Wall Street types competed for a narrow lot bordering both of their properties there. And when we say narrow, the strip of land is almost 1,900 feet long - 1900 feet long and one foot wide.

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Business
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

G-20 Fears An End To Fed's Quantitative Easing

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Leaders of the world's largest economies complete their summit in St. Petersburg, Russia today.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports this meeting has been marked by a growing divide between the most highly developed nations and emerging economies.

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Business
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Millennials Force Car Execs To Rethink Business Plans

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's focus like a laser on this next story. For the last month, NPR and Youth Radio have been reporting on the changing relationship between the millennial generation and the automobile.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: When I try to imagine my dream car, I draw a blank and then I reach for my phone.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: The symbol of freedom isn't the car anymore.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: I'm not sure that any car company really understands this generation of buyers.

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Middle East
3:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Strikes On Syria Could Send Ripple Effects Across Region

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 8:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Sports
2:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Olympic Committee To Announce 2020 Summer Games Host

Tokyo's 2020 candidate city logo.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:22 pm

Saturday in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the International Olympic Committee will announce the host of the 2020 Summer Games. The committee is choosing from among Istanbul, Madrid and Tokyo. The contenders all have strong selling points, but each also has serious issues clouding its bid.

Violent Crackdown Hangs Over Turkey's Bid

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Business
1:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Rates Come Down On Jumbo Mortgage Loans

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:40 am

There is something new and different for home mortgages: Jumbo loans are being made at lower interest rates than traditional home loans. That's kind of like a first class airplane ticket being cheaper than riding in coach.

At first this seems crazy. For as long as anybody can remember, homeowners have had to pay a premium to get jumbo loans. That's because they're not guaranteed by the federal government. If they're not guaranteed, they're riskier, so they cost more in interest payments.

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Shots - Health News
12:54 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After A Decade, Congress Moves To Fix Doctors' Medicare Pay

I think I see the problem.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:59 am

Hear the words health care and Congress, and you think fight, right?

And you'd be forgiven, particularly because the House has now voted some 40 times in the past two years to repeal or otherwise undo portions of the Affordable Care Act.

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StoryCorps
12:53 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Remembering A Boss Who Led A Team To Safety On Sept. 11

Connie Labetti, 52, was able to escape one of the World Trade Center buildings on Sept. 11, 2001, thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:46 am

Connie Labetti worked on the 99th floor of the south tower — the second World Trade Center tower to be hit on Sept. 11, 2001.

She made it out of the building thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio. He, however, did not survive. Fazio was one of 176 Aon employees who died that day. He was 57.

"He's the reason I'm here, there's no question about it," 52-year-old Labetti says. "Most of us survived that day because of him."

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Movie Reviews
10:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Dentist, Heal Thy Sister (And Vice Versa)

Reach Out And ... What Was It Again? Josh Pais and Rosemarie DeWitt are a brother and sister with serious life changes to negotiate in Touchy Feely.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:40 pm

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The Two-Way
5:45 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

The Other G-20 Drama: Obama And Brazilian President Rousseff

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff attends the first working meeting of the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:49 pm

While everyone has been focused on Syria, including the dramatic meeting of two world leaders at odds over the situation, there was another bit of drama unfolding Thursday at the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia:

President Obama was late to dinner apparently because he was busy trying to smooth over a conflict with Brazil.

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The Salt
4:41 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Was Your Chicken Nugget Made In China? It'll Soon Be Hard To Know

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:52 am

Here's a bit of news that might make you drop that chicken nugget midbite.

Just before the start of the long holiday weekend last Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture quietly announced that it was ending a ban on processed chicken imports from China. The kicker: These products can now be sold in the U.S. without a country-of-origin label.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

German Police Raid Christian Sect For Alleged Child Abuse

View of the village of Klosterzimmern near Deiningen, Germany on Friday. The village is home to the religious community 'Zwoelf Staemme' ('Twelve Tribes').
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:31 am

Two communities affiliated with a U.S.-founded Christian sect have been raided by German police, who removed 40 children after allegations of abuse.

Officials say they acted after receiving evidence of ongoing child abuse at the two communities in Bavaria belonging to the Twelve Tribes, according to Germany's Spiegel Online.

According to the BBC, more than 100 officers were part of the operation to remove the children, who were placed in temporary foster homes.

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Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

'Smitten Kitchen' Author On Learning To Love Kale

Food blogger Deb Perelman was initially a kale skeptic — until this Kale Salad With Pecorino And Walnuts changed her mind.
Deb Perelman

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Kale has experienced a renaissance in recent years. Once relegated to the sidelines as a mere garnish, the green now appears on 400 percent more restaurant menus than it did four years ago.

But not everyone has bought into the gospel of the vitamin- and mineral-rich green. Even Deb Perelman, who writes the blog and cookbook Smitten Kitchen, was initially a kale skeptic.

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Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Swing Your Partner: W.Va. Circles Back To Square Dancing

A couple takes to the floor in Harmon, W.Va., in 2012. West Virginia is trying to revitalize its square-dance tradition.
Jessie Wright-Mendoza for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Square dancing, once a pillar of small-town life, is making a comeback in West Virginia. A statewide project is trying to help communities preserve and promote this part of their cultural heritage.

Marlinton, W.Va., is one of the towns taking up the cause. Its square dances can gather a crowd, but residents still worry about attracting the attention of the next generation.

If you go to a square dance in Marlinton, there are some rules to follow. First of all, leave your stereotypes at the door, says Becky Hill, who works on The Mountain Dance Trail initiative.

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Arts & Life
4:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What Elevated Kale From Vegetable To Cultural Identifier?

Of all the healthy foods you could eat, what inspires some people to wear kale T-shirts and sport kale stickers? Why do some people see kale as a part of their identities?

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