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3:18 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Bank Robberies On The Decline As Risk Outweighs The Rewards

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jack Nicas, staff reporter at the Wall Street Journal, and why bank robberies have been on the decline.

Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Congress May Not Let Postal Service End Saturday Mail Delivery

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it plans to end Saturday delivery later this year. The Postal Service lost more than $15 billion in fiscal year 2012 and it is under great pressure to reduce those losses.

Shots - Health News
3:07 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Defying Expectations, GOP Governors Embrace Medicaid Expansion

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, favors a federally subsidized expansion of Medicaid in his state.
Carlos Osorio AP

Top-ranked archrivals Michigan and Ohio State faced off Wednesday night on the basketball court for the second time in this season (Michigan won in overtime to split the series).

But both states' Republican governors have something more in common this week than an intense distaste for their neighboring state's athletic team.

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It's All Politics
3:00 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

NRA's 'Anti-Gun' List Includes Some Not-So-Obvious Names

The Kansas City Royals professional baseball team is among more than 500 groups and individuals listed by the NRA as "anti-gun."
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:12 pm

What do the Kansas City Royals, C. Everett Koop, Jack Nicholson and the United Methodist Church all have in common?

Turns out the Major League Baseball team, the former surgeon general, the actor and the denomination's general board and church society are all enemies of firearms, and as such have made it onto the National Rifle Association's list of "National Organizations With Anti-Gun Policies."

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All Songs Considered
2:50 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

James Hunter's Well-Worn Soul Bursts With Life

Geoff Woods Courtesy of the artist

James Hunter has spent his life learning how to tell soul's stories in fresh and personal ways. Born in 1962 in Essex, England and mentored early on by Van Morrison, he embarked on a career with many ups and downs before breaking through in America in his forties. Now the Grammy-nominated Hunter has made his first album in the States, where the music he loves was born.

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National Security
2:38 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Media Reports Reveal CIA's Drone Base In Saudi Arabia

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

The details of a secret U.S. drone base in Saudi Arabia, used to launch targeted killings and surveillance missions into Yemen, were revealed Wednesday in several American media outlets. Audie Cornish speaks with Karen DeYoung, national security correspondent for The Washington Post, who authored one of the articles on the program

Games & Humor
2:36 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Monopoly Fans Dump Iron Token For New Cat Piece

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

On a lighter, much lighter economic note, fans of Monopoly have spoken. After a month of online voting, one of the iconic game's playing pieces is being replaced. Goodbye Iron, hello Cat, which won after polls closed at 11:59 P.M. Tuesday.

As NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, the new feline will arrive on Monopoly boards by fall.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: For some, the news has been absolutely traumatizing. Walk the streets of New York City and you'll hear cries of distress over the death of the Iron.

Evan Forster hates cats.

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Shots - Health News
2:28 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Debate Rages On Even As Research Ban On Gun Violence Ends

More than 400 guns, including these three, were turned in during a Dallas gun buyback program in January. But determining the effectiveness of such programs is difficult due to limits on gun-related research.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

The characteristics of gun violence in the U.S. are largely unknown because key federal health agencies have been banned from conducting such research since the mid-1990s.

President Obama, however, wants to change that.

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Music Interviews
2:28 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Anat Cohen: Bringing The Clarinet To The World

Jazz clarinetist Anat Cohen has a new album out called Claroscuro.
Jimmy Katz Anzic Records

Clarinetist Anat Cohen is one of a handful of Israeli jazz musicians making a mark on the American jazz scene. She's been voted Clarinetist of the Year six years in a row by the Jazz Journalists Association, and her most recent album, Claroscuro, showcases the range of her talents and musical influences, from New Orleans-style jazz to Israel to Latin music — particularly that of Brazil.

Cohen says that the clarinet's somewhat old-fashioned reputation may be the result of the very thing that attracts her to the instrument.

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It's All Politics
2:27 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

From Oil Fields To REI, Interior Nominee Has Outdoorsy Cred

REI CEO Sally Jewell delivers remarks Wednesday after being nominated by President Obama to be the next secretary of the interior.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:19 pm

President Obama's choice to take over at the Department of the Interior comes from the business world. Sally Jewell is the CEO of outdoor equipment supplier REI.

"For Sally, the toughest part of this job will probably be sitting behind a desk," the president said when introducing his nominee Wednesday. "I suspect she'll want to get out of the office quite a bit."

Before Jewell took the reins at REI, she worked in the financial industry at Washington Mutual. Before that, she was an engineer in the oil business, with Mobil.

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NPR Story
2:27 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

South Dakota Tribes Accuse State Of Violating Indian Welfare Act

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. He was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.
John Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 9:35 am

For years now, council members of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe in South Dakota have watched as the state's Department of Social Services removed children from the reservation and placed many of them in white foster homes, far from tribal lands. Many of the children were later adopted, losing their connection to their families and heritage.

"I've seen it firsthand," says Brandon Sazue, chairman of the Crow Creek tribe.

Sazue says the state has long overstepped its authority.

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Music News
2:19 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

The 'Ancient Vibration' Of Parlor Music, Revived By Two Generations

Lena Hughes recorded one album of Southern parlor music before her death in 1998.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 7:29 am

Sometime in the mid-1960s — no one's really sure when — Lena Hughes walked into a recording studio, probably in Arkansas. What we do know is that she recorded 11 tunes on the guitar.

"It's kind of like listening to 1880," folklorist Howard Marshall says. "You kind of get a wonderful, ancient vibration."

Marshall wrote a book about traditional music in Missouri, called Play Me Something Quick and Devilish.

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The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Game On! Rare 1865 Baseball Card Sold For $80,000

The Library of Congress' version of the rare Brooklyn Atlantics baseball card.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 9:46 am

Update at 8:06 p.m. ET. Card Sells For $80,000

The nearly 150-year-old Brooklyn Atlantics baseball card that was was discovered late last year in a photo album bought at a yard sale has sold for $80,000 — $92,000 if you count the auction house's buyer's premium.

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Though Forecast Is Tricky, Northeast Could Face Record-Breaking Snow Storm

The NAM model shows one of the more severe resolutions, with up to 50 inches of snow in some parts of New England.
Wright Weather via Twitter

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 7:24 pm

Areas from New York to Maine could be in store for a record-breaking nor'Easter, this weekend.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the forecast is tricky, but "the coming storm looks to be as close to a meteorologist's worst nightmare as can be imagined."

The paper continues:

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U.S.
1:59 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

As Drought Intensifies, 2 States Dig In Over Water War

Harlan County Lake, the Republican River's main reservoir in Nebraska, dropped 10 feet during the summer drought and hasn't recovered.
Grant Gerlock

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:28 pm

Epic water battles are the stuff of history and legend, especially in the West. And as a severe drought drags on in the Midwest, a water war is being waged over a river that irrigates agriculture in Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas.

It's that last border crossing where this water war is under way. Kansas has gone to the Supreme Court to argue that Nebraska uses too much water from the Republican River, and that there's not enough left for Kansas farmers.

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Around the Nation
1:52 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Shooting Of 'American Sniper' Raises Questions About PTSD Treatment

Chris Kyle, a retired Navy SEAL and best-selling author of American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, was killed at a gun range near Glen Rose, Texas, on Feb. 2.
Paul Moseley MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

Police in Texas have charged Eddie Ray Routh, a 25-year-old U.S. Marine reservist, with capital murder. Arrest records indicate that Routh had been twice taken to a mental hospital in recent months, and had told police he was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Mothra? No, It's Just A Robot Exoskeleton Controlled By A Moth

That's a moth controlling that robot. But don't worry.
Institute of Physics

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 7:24 pm

What could go wrong?

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Citing Uncertainty, Pentagon Will Not Deploy Aircraft Carrier To Persian Gulf

Aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman in the Atalntic Ocean.
U.S. Navy Getty Images

The uncertainty surrounding the Pentagon's budget means it will not deploy a second aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced today.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that Panetta is also proposing pay cuts for troops. Tom filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The recommendation by Secretary Panetta mean that those in uniform could get a 1 percent pay hike next year, instead of 1.7 percent. But a final decision would rest with Congress.

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All Songs Considered
12:54 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Hear Lisa Hannigan Cover Nick Drake For A New Tribute Album

Lisa Hannigan performs in one of several live concerts for a new tribute album, Way to Blue: The Songs of Nick Drake.
Courtesy of the artist

Veteran producer Joe Boyd says he'd long resisted putting together some sort of tribute album for his late friend, the legendary folksinger Nick Drake. But he finally decided to make one when Boyd realized that the recordings could be captured in a live concert. "In my opinion, the only way to make a tribute record work is to get everyone together in the same place so there's a unity of sound and spirit," he tells us in an email.

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Bud's Latest Clydesdale Star Named 'Hope' By Fans

She's now known as Hope.
Budweiser

The Clydesdale foal who starred at the start of Budweiser's popular Super Bowl ad this week has a name.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Wed February 6, 2013

AC Milan VP Unleashes Another Racism Scandal, Referring To Player With Slur

Paolo Berlusconi looks on during the Serie A match between AC Milan and FC Internazionale Milano in 2012.
Claudio Villa Getty Images

The vice president of the soccer club AC Milan, who is also Silvio Berlusconi's younger brother, has unleashed another racism scandal.

During a political rally, Paolo Berlusconi referred to one of his players, Mario Balotelli, by using the "N" word.

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Politics
11:23 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Shifting Strategy: Narrowing Down The GOP Field

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Brown sits this one out in the Bay State, Menendez says it ain't so, and Kerry steps in at State. It's Wednesday and time for a ...

SECRETARY JOHN KERRY: Big heels to fill...

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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Economy
11:07 am
Wed February 6, 2013

The Squeeze: Higher Costs And Smaller Paychecks

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 11:31 am

The economy may be on the rebound, but life is getting tougher for some people in the middle class. With rising gas prices, insurance costs, and higher payroll taxes, people are feeling squeezed. Host Michel Martin asks if there's any financial relief in sight.

Politics
11:07 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Shutting Down Black Markets For Guns

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, rising gas prices, rising insurance costs, and rising payroll taxes - Happy New Year, middle class. We'll talk with NPR's senior business editor Marilyn Geewax in just a few minutes about all the things that are squeezing the middle class right now - as if you hadn't noticed.

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Beauty Shop
11:07 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Does Having Guns Make Women Safer?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, I'm happy I have a chance to tell you more about two women who made or are making an impression, one by speaking up, one by choosing not to. That's coming up later in the program.

But, first, it's time for the Beauty Shop. That's where we get a fresh cut on the week's top issues with our panel of women writers, journalists and commentators.

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Can I Just Tell You?
11:07 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Bravery By Speaking Up Or Keeping Quiet?

fifteen-year-old Malala Yousefzai relaxes. The Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban on Oct. 9 2012 has made her first video statement since she was nearly killed, released Monday, saying she is recovering.
Courtesy of Malala Yousefzai AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 3:31 pm

Finally today I want to talk about - and I want you to hear - the voices of two women: one who is really at the beginning of her life, one whose life has just come to its end. One I had the privilege to meet. One I have not — at least not yet. But they are both women who stand for something.

And here is the first:

"Today you can see that I'm alive."

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Your Money
11:07 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Skip The Flowers And Jewelry For Your Valentine

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Oh, Mama! World's 'Oldest' Bird Has Another Chick

Wisdom (left) and her mate on their nest last November at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge.
Pete Leary USFWS

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Pete Leary is proud to announce that Wisdom the Laysan albatross, who at age 62 (or so) is the "oldest known wild bird" in the world, has hatched another chick.

Wisdom's latest offspring "was observed pecking its way into the world" on Sunday at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in the North Pacific Ocean, the agency says.

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Afghanistan
10:52 am
Wed February 6, 2013

U.S., Afghanistan At Odds Over Weapons Wish List

Afghan soldiers conduct an artillery training exercise in the northwest province of Badghis in July 2012.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:12 pm

The U.S. and the international community have pledged $16 billion to support Afghan security forces after NATO troops complete their drawdown at the end of 2014. That money covers the cost of troops and equipment.

But just what equipment will be provided? Afghan military officials want big-ticket planes, tanks and other conventional weapons.

The U.S., however, says the Afghans need to get their strategic priorities in order, and focus less on prestige hardware and more on weaponry and equipment suitable for counterinsurgency warfare.

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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Assassination Of Opposition Figure Leads To Protests In Tunisia

A Tunisian protester jumps amid smoke after police fired tear gas during a rally outside the Interior ministry to protest after Tunisian opposition leader and outspoken government critic Chokri Belaid was shot dead.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 12:25 pm

The birthplace of the Arab Spring is seized with mass protests today: Tunisians took to the streets to denounce the assassination of Chokri Belaid, the country's leading opposition figure.

As the BBC reports, Belaid was the secular opponent of the moderate Islamist government and he "was shot in the neck and head on his way to work" Wednesday morning.

CNN reports:

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