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Around the Nation
9:43 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Why Are Rihanna And Chris Brown Back Together!?

Pop singer Rihanna recently announced she's back together with recording artist Chris Brown, after an abusive relationship and public breakup. She says he's changed, but many people say this shows just how complicated domestic abuse can be. Host Michel Martin finds out why victims reconcile and whether abusers can really change.

The Two-Way
9:42 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Where In The U.S. Should You Leave 3 Hours Early For A 30-Minute Drive?

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:16 am

This news got our attention, and not just because The Two-Way's home office is in the nation's capital:

Washington, D.C., and its surrounding suburbs are the worst place in the nation to be if you absolutely, positively have to get to an important appointment on time.

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Political Junkie
9:40 am
Tue February 5, 2013

It's ScuttleButton Time!

Ken Rudin collection

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 2:22 pm

So what did you do during the blackout on Super Bowl Sunday? Other than, say, apply some deer antler spray?

For most Americans, it was trying to figure out the ScuttleButton puzzle on Super Bowl Sunday. Actually, it's always difficult trying to solve ScuttleButton while watching the game on Super Bowl Sunday. But now it's time to focus on the new puzzle.

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The Two-Way
9:09 am
Tue February 5, 2013

U.S. Olympic Skier Lindsey Vonn Crashes In Austrian Event

Skier Lindsay Vonn is airlifted after crashing during the women's Super-G event in Schladming, Austria, possibly injuring her knee, on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013.
Luca Bruno AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:36 am

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association says that American skier Lindsey Vonn crashed during the women's world Super-G competition in Austria today and was airlifted to a nearby hospital. Reports indicate she may have a serious knee injury.

The gold-winning Olympian was trailing the race leader by 0.12 seconds, according to the USSA, when she crashed. She was taken for medical treatment by helicopter, which the organization says is 'standard protocol'.

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Obama Calls For Small Package Of Cuts, Tax Changes To Head Off 'Sequester'

President Obama at the White House on Tuesday.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:02 am

(We updated the top of this post at 1:30 p.m. ET.)

Looking to head off deep, automatic spending cuts set to kick in on March 1, President Obama on Tuesday afternoon said that to avoid the negative economic effects that come with "political disfunction," Congress should move quickly to pass "a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms" that won't hurt the economy.

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All Songs Considered
9:02 am
Tue February 5, 2013

New Music From The Knife, Four Tet, Cloud Cult And (Oh Yeah) My Bloody Valentine

Clockwise from upper left: Early photo of My Bloody Valentine, Grouper, The Knife, Ballake Sissoko.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 9:19 am

We had this show all wrapped up last Friday. It was totally in the can! Then My Bloody Valentine dropped its highly anticipated new album over the weekend and threw our previously recorded show into total chaos! But hey, it was worth it. We (and all the other My Bloody Valentine fans out there) have been waiting more than 20 years for this! Hear a new cut from the album and tell us what you think in the comments section.

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The Salt
8:48 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Why Health Officials Want You To Eat More Potassium

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:32 am

It's a real bummer to be told to eat less of something. Especially when it's salt, the ubiquitous ingredient that seems to make everything taste a little better.

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U.S.
8:29 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Ala. Bunker Standoff Ends With Gunman Dead, Boy Alive

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Seigel.

A week-long hostage standoff in Alabama is over. Last week in the southeastern part of the state, a man kidnapped a boy from a school bus and took him into an underground bunker. Authorities had been trying to negotiate his release ever since. Late today, it was announced that the kidnapper is dead and the five-year-old hostage is OK.

Here's the FBI's Steve Richardson giving a statement in Midland City.

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Monkey See
8:28 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Even Balzac Had To Intern

Before he became a founder of realism and an unlikely literary sex icon, the young Honoré de Balzac was proofreading legal filings.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 11:01 am

A young man graduates from college. At his father's insistence, he begins interning at a law firm. But when it comes time to pursue the profession, he refuses: He wants to do something more meaningful. He wants to write.

Sound like your son/cousin/roommate/best friend? It was Honoré de Balzac.

That's right – before he became a founder of realism and an unlikely literary sex icon ("Do not suppose," an Italian count wrote to his wife, "that the ugliness of his face will protect you from his irresistible power"), the young Balzac was proofreading legal filings.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Tuareg Fighters In Mali Arrest Fleeing Islamist Militant Leaders

Malian troops near Hambori, northern Mali are driving toward Gao on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013.
Jerome Delay AP

Here's a turnabout in Mali: ethnic Tuareg rebels once allied with Islamist militants have captured two militant leaders in the northwestern part of the country as they tried to escape into Algeria.

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Shots - Health News
8:06 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Will Your Long-Term Care Coverage Keep Up With Changing Times?

The health services offered in 30 years may not be explicitly covered by the long-term care insurance you buy today.
Pamela Moore iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:39 am

If you're investing to protect yourself from something that may happen 20 or 30 years down the road, you'd like to be confident that your plan will keep pace with the times.

That's a calculation purchasers of long-term care insurance have to make. But a provision in those policies that people rely on to help ensure their coverage will meet their needs decades hence may fall short.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dell Seals $24.2 Billion Buyout Deal; Founder Among Buyers

Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:56 am

"Slumping personal computer maker Dell is selling itself for $24.4 billion to its founder and a group of investors that includes Microsoft," The Associated Press writes, in "the largest deal of its kind since the Great Recession dried up financing for risky maneuvers like this."

The wire service adds that "the complex agreement announced Tuesday will end Dell Inc.'s nearly 25-year history as a publicly traded company. Shareholders are receiving $13.65 per share for their stock. ... Founder Michael Dell will remain the company's CEO and largest shareholder."

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It's All Politics
7:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Lonely And Frustrated: These May Be The Worst Jobs In Politics

Democrats have dominated Rhode Island's Capitol building in Providence for decades. One state Republican says it's an "uphill battle" to sell voters and candidates on the GOP's message.
Myles Dumas iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:56 pm

Politics is filled with thankless jobs.

It's the nature of the business that plenty of people have to work for highly demanding egomaniacs. Among elected officials, few relish having to spend big chunks of their time asking other people for money, one of the essential chores.

There are certain jobs, however, that appear from the outside to be so hopeless that you wonder why anyone agreed to take them on.

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The Two-Way
6:35 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Broader Justification Emerges Of When U.S. Can Kill Americans Who Join Al-Qaida

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:57 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep

American citizens who become leaders in al-Qaida or other terrorist organizations overseas and pose "an imminent threat" to Americans may be killed with drone strikes even when there's no evidence that they have specific plans to attack Americans or U.S. interests, according to a Justice Department memo that surfaced Monday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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Around the Nation
5:53 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Tuba Players Take Valentine's Day Requests

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montage. As one considers the many ways of wooing a beloved on Valentine's Day, the ungainly tuba and its deep bass sound are not the most obviously romantic. Still, a dozen tuba players at the University of Memphis in cute red vests and bow ties are offering a tuba serenade that will at least bring smiles. Their fee includes chocolates, a card, and two classic tunes like "My Girl" and "My Guy."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

(humming)

Asia
5:43 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Osama Bin Laden's Hideout City Plans Makeover

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Abbottabad, Pakistan became world famous in 2011. Osama bin Laden was killed at his hiding place there. Now, the city plans an image makeover. It plans a family-friendly amusement park. The Hazara Heritage Park and Amusement City will include restaurants, mini golf, a butterfly zoo and a lake. A lawmaker tells the Guardian newspapers the park should reassure the world the city is not full of militants and is safe.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:41 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Dramatic End To Alabama Hostage Standoff Took Careful Planning

Law enforcement officials, including some from the FBI, near the scene of the hostage situation in Midland City, Ala., on Friday.
Philip Sears Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:29 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Dan Carsen reports

(We updated the top of this post with new material at 9:50 a.m. ET.)

As more becomes known about how authorities on Monday rescued an almost-6-year-old boy named Ethan from his nearly week-long captivity in an Alabama bunker with a gunman, some fascinating details are emerging.

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Book News: Mary Ingalls May Not Have Gone Blind From Scarlet Fever

Mary Ingalls, the sister of Laura Ingalls Wilder, went blind from illness at age 14.
Wikimedia

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 12:30 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Feb. 4-10: Werewolves, Nano-Horror And Apartheid's Aftermath

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:10 am

Fiction and nonfiction softcover releases from Nadine Gordimer, Michael Crichton and Richard Preston, Anne Rice, Paul Krugman and Charles Murray.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Writing Well Is The Wronged Wife's Revenge In 'See Now Then'

Jamaica Kincaid, author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, lives in Vermont.
Kenneth Noland Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:42 am

On one level, See Now Then, Jamaica Kincaid's first novel in a decade, is a lyrical, interior meditation on time and memory by a devoted but no longer cherished wife and mother going about the daily business of taking care of her home and family in a small New England town. But it is also one of the most damning retaliations by a jilted wife since Nora Ephron's Heartburn. See Now Then reads as if Gertrude Stein and Virginia Woolf had collaborated on a heartbroken housewife's lament that reveals an impossible familiarity with Heartburn and Evan S.

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Iraq
4:56 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Why Is Violence Ramping Up In Iraq?

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Across Syria's eastern border, Iraq is nearing the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led international invasion. The war that ended the repressive regime of Saddam Hussein is over but the killing is not. Insurgents sprang up under U.S. occupation and sectarian and ethnic rifts left thousands dead. Though the bloodshed peaked about six years ago, the death toll there is still stunning. Last month across the country it reached 246. And we're learning this morning about more violence in Iraq.

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Sports
4:48 am
Tue February 5, 2013

European Authorities Probe Soccer Corruption

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rene Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The world's most popular sport is under investigation for corruption. European police say they've found evidence of a vast criminal network that fixed hundreds of soccer matches. The conspiracies are alleged to span continents and involve players, team officials, league staff and serious criminals. Investigators say they're looking at teams competing for places in soccer's biggest tournament, the World Cup.

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Asia
4:36 am
Tue February 5, 2013

India Criticized For Changing Rape Laws To Hastily

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In New Delhi, prosecutors called their first witness to the stand in the trial of five men accused of a gang-rape and the murder that's horrified India and the world. The victim's male companion, who was beaten and left for dead alongside her, appeared in court in a wheelchair to testify.

Indians are eager to see justice done, but as NPR's Julie McCarthy reports, the realities of government and the courts are dampening expectations.

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Business
4:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Reports: Dell To Become Private Company

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:56 am

A $24.4 billion buyout that would take computer maker Dell private was announced Tuesday. The group negotiating to buy the company includes private equity firm Silver Lake, Microsoft and Dell's founder Michael Dell.

Business
4:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

S&P To Face Fraud Suit Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The U.S. Justice Department plans to file a civil suit this week accusing the credit rating company Standard and Poor's of fraud. Standard and Poor's is the company that famously downgraded U.S. debt in 2011. This investigation focuses on S and P's actions before the financial crisis. The civil action accuses S and P of fraudulently inflating the ratings of mortgage investments, setting them up for the crash that lead to the great recession. The investigation is the focus of today's Business Bottom Line, and here's NPR's Jim Zarroli.

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Business
4:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

FCC Proposes Public WiFi Network

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The federal government has proposed an ambitious plan to build public WiFi networks throughout the country. The idea is to boost innovation and make the Internet cheaper and more accessible.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Federal Communications Commission wants to do this by acquiring wireless spectrum from television broadcasters, including certain airwaves and set them aside for public use.

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National Security
4:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

DOJ Paper: When Its OK To Kill Americans In Al-Qaida

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President Obama's administration is trying to work out its legal rational for a controversial policy. It's the killing of American citizens suspected of terrorism. A newly obtained Justice Department document lays out a rational. That document argues the United States has authority to target Americans who are senior al-Qaida figures even without evidence they are about to carry out a specific attack.

NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson is here to talk about this document. Carrie, good morning.

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Politics
4:26 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Obama Speech Expected To Flesh Out Climate Proposals

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama delivers his State of Union address a week from today. That speech is expected to expand on proposals the president put forth at his inauguration. One surprise in his inaugural address was a call to do more on climate change - that after a campaign that mostly ignored concerns about the environment. NPR's Ari Shapiro looks at what environmental groups are expecting now.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: President Obama's inaugural address spent a full eight sentences on climate, more than any other subject.

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NPR Story
4:10 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Texas Court Of Inquiry To Decide If Prosecutor Lied

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 11:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In Texas, a court of inquiry has been convened to consider prosecuting a Texas judge. He's Ken Anderson. He used to be the district attorney in Williamson County, Texas, and he could face criminal charges for concealing exculpatory evidence. That's evidence that could clear a defendant of guilt. The inquiry concerns his conduct during what has become an infamous case - the prosecution and conviction of Michael Morton. Morton was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to life in prison for murdering his wife. NPR's Wade Goodwin reports.

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