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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Gift Worth $400 Million To Art Institute Of Chicago Includes Works By Warhol

Andy Warhol's Mona Lisa Four Times, 1978.
Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Edlis/Neeson Collection

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:35 pm

Chicago art collectors Stefan Edlis and Gael Neeson have given a "landmark gift" of pop art to the Art Institute of Chicago, handing over 42 works that were created by Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and others.

After the donation was officially accepted Tuesday night, the museum's president and director, Douglas Druick, told The Chicago Tribune, "This is one of the landmark gifts in our 136-year history."

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Saudi Arabia Shifts Military Campaign In Yemen; Airstrikes Continue

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:49 am

After announcing a more limited military campaign against rebels in Yemen, Saudi Arabia continues to conduct airstrikes that began weeks ago. President Obama says the U.S. has warned Iran, which has condemned the Saudi strikes, not to deliver weapons to rebels in Yemen.

It's unclear what the Saudi-led coalition is planning for the next phase of its military operation in Yemen. The group has said it will protect civilians, ensure the flow of humanitarian aid and secure safe passage for foreigners who want to flee the violence.

NPR's Alice Fordham reports:

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Goats and Soda
6:49 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Why Somali Grandmas And Aid Workers Might Be Short On Cash

A Somali woman counts the cash she collected from a money transfer service in Mogadishu, the capital city.
Farah Abdi Warsameh AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:48 pm

A Somali who's living and working abroad wants to send money to his grandmother in a remote village. A money transfer company gets the cash delivered in a flash.

An aid organization wants to pay its Somali staff. Again, money transfer companies do the job in a country where the banking system shut down in 1991, when the government collapsed.

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Wilding? Ruff Ride? Dog's Road Romp On Tractor Sparks Puns

Don the dog mugs for the camera after his joyride.
Traffic Scotland via Twitter

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:41 am

As soon as the news broke, Traffic Scotland took pains to say it was a serious event, not a joke. But that didn't stop people from putting their own spin on the story of the border collie who took control of a small tractor — which then drove onto a highway Wednesday.

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Shots - Health News
5:56 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Is It Time To Make Medical And Family Leave Paid?

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:54 am

It's been more than 20 years since passage of the landmark Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows workers to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off for medical or family reasons without losing their jobs.

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The Two-Way
5:44 am
Wed April 22, 2015

'Sliver Of Hope' In Freddie Gray Case, Former Baltimore Police Chief Says

Protesters rally after a march for Freddie Gray that ended in front of the Baltimore Police Department's Western District police station Tuesday. Gray, 25, died from spinal injuries on April 19, one week after being arrested.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:28 am

"Enough is enough!" hundreds of people chanted over and over in Baltimore Tuesday night, at a rally for Freddie Gray, a young black man who died in police custody earlier this month. A federal civil rights inquiry was launched Tuesday.

"We've had some other problems with African-Americans dying in police custody and at the hands of police officers here in Baltimore city," says Leonard Hamm, a former commissioner of the Baltimore Police Department who served from 2004-2007.

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Europe
5:44 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Cheers! 170-Year-Old Champagne Recovered From Shipwreck

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
5:44 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Firefighters Extricate Stuck Duck From Fireplace

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Toni Morrison's New Novel Is Best Read With Her Backlist In Mind

Toni Morrison's novels include Beloved, The Bluest Eye and Song of Solomon. She won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1993.
Timothy Greenfield Sanders

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 10:14 am

When we talk about Toni Morrison, we are also talking about what it means to thrive in the midst of well-manicured and eloquent hostility. With God Help The Child, Morrison — America's only living Nobel Prize-winning novelist — has offered us not only her 11th novel, but an opportunity to meditate on the tension between the idea of the artist and the reality of the artist herself.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed April 22, 2015

'Vermilion' Finds New Magic In The Old West

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 12:29 pm

History may be written by the victors, but alternate history is written by anyone with a lust for the past — both established and imagined. Molly Tanzer's imagination is keener than almost anyone's. Her new novel, Vermilion is a work of alt-history that finds a fresh kind of magic in the mingling of fact and fantasy. In the book's wild vision of 1870, the North won the Civil War with the help of a race of intelligent, talking bears. A similarly endowed species of sea lion keeps shop in the streets of San Francisco.

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Politics
4:47 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Democrats Call Lynch Confirmation Delay A New Low In Washington Gridlock

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 3:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
4:30 am
Wed April 22, 2015

European Parliament President Urges Action On Migration Crisis

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
4:29 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Migrants Recall Horrors Of Mediterranean Shipwreck

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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There are more harrowing details emerging from a shipwreck off the coast of Libya last weekend. As many as 900 migrants were said to be onboard; only a handful survived.

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Politics
3:14 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Renewed Trade Debate Puts Presidential Candidates On The Spot

In New Hampshire on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton weighed in on the trade deal without taking sides. "Well, any trade deal has to produce jobs and raise wages and increase prosperity and protect our security," she said.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 12:51 pm

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Business
3:10 am
Wed April 22, 2015

20 Years Ago, Match.Com Revolutionized How To Find A Date

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Whether you get dumped in person or over the Internet, another potential soulmate is only a click away. It so happens that the first online dating site is celebrating a big anniversary.

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Middle East
3:02 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Saudi Strikes In Yemen Wrap Up; Operation Renewal Of Hope Begins

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:26 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Yemen, the poorest country in the Middle East, has become the flashpoint in a conflict between bigger powers who are fighting for influence in the region.

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Boston Bombing Jury To Hear More Testimony Before Sentencing Tsarnaev

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

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NPR Story
3:01 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Young Black Man In Baltimore Dies 1 Week After A Police Confrontation

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 4:09 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:01 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Bradley's 'China Mirage' Portrays A Long-Running U.S. Mistake In Asia

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Back At Base
1:52 am
Wed April 22, 2015

National Guard Members Struggle To Keep Civilian Careers

Rida Sihab Mansour, a staff sergeant in the National Guard, stands with the uniform he wears when he serves on the honor guard at military funerals. He says he's positive that his guard commitments are making it more difficult to build a career.
Katie Schoolov KPBS

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 3:47 pm

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Parallels
1:50 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people.
Alessandro Fucarini AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 12:22 pm

Italian prosecutors say the ship carrying hundreds of migrants that sank over the weekend most likely crashed against a cargo ship that had come to its rescue.

Merchant ships are often called on to help rescue migrants on vessels attempting to cross the Mediterranean. So when a distress call went out late Saturday evening from the overloaded migrant vessel, commercial vessels in the region responded.

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Parallels
1:49 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Last Armenian Village In Turkey Keeps Silent About 1915 Slaughter

Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year.
Photo 12 Photo12/UIG/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:45 am

A hundred years ago this week, the Ottoman Empire began the killings and forced marches of Armenians in what most historians call the first genocide of the 20th century.

Turkey staunchly denies that label, saying the deaths — estimated by historians at around 1.5 million — were part of widespread ethnic fighting in a civil war.

Regardless of the label used, the result was destruction of virtually every Armenian community in the Ottoman Empire, which collapsed after the war. What was left of the country transitioned into the modern-day Republic of Turkey.

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Sweetness And Light
1:48 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Bruce Jenner's Long History Of Clearing Hurdles

Decathlon gold medalist Bruce Jenner throws the javelin during an Olympic competition in Montreal on July 30, 1976.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:03 am

In an interview airing Friday on ABC, Bruce Jenner is expected to announce that he is transgender, though he has made no such acknowledgment.

As the public awaits his presumed revelations, Jenner is still invariably and glibly identified by his paternal connection to the Kardashian clan. It's presented almost anecdotally that he won the gold medal for the Olympic decathlon — the 10-event classic of track and field athleticism — in 1976. But back then, he was a glorified champion and called "the world's greatest athlete."

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Jazz Night In America: Wednesday Night Webcasts
6:15 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Akua Dixon At Central Brooklyn Jazz Festival

Akua Dixon.
Jose Iorio Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 4:49 pm

It's not as if there were ever clear paths for cello players beyond the European classical tradition, but Akua Dixon made one for herself. The New York City native found work in the pit band of the Apollo Theater, the multi-racial Symphony of the New World, and the bands of many jazz musicians — including drummer Max Roach's Double Quartet. As she developed her jazz chops, she also started her own string quartet, featured prominently on her new self-titled album. Akua Dixon also features her crafty arranging for strings over jazz standards and Afro-Latin grooves.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Remembering Pat Dowell, Longtime Film Reporter For NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:33 am

Pat Dowell, a freelance film reporter for NPR, died on Sunday. Dowell had been dealing with health issues for some time, but her death came as a surprise. She was 66 years old.

Pat was a freelancer for us for close to 30 years. Before that, she was a film critic for a number of publications and first appeared on our air in that capacity in 1974, when she talked to then-All Things Considered host Susan Stamberg about the TV series Rhoda and feminism.

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The Salt
4:33 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

Pappy Van Winkle bourbons at Bourbons Bistro in Louisville, Ky. The spirit was pricey even before a heist at the distillery.
Noah Adams/for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:56 am

Finally, the great Kentucky bourbon mystery has been solved.

Back in 2013, more than 200 bottles of aging Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a locked, secure area of the Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, Ky. Even before the heist, the bottles were rare — some fetched as much as $1,000 in private sales.

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Law
4:25 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 8:58 am

Bob Ball is a real estate investor in Portland, Ore., but that's just his day job. For the past 20 years, he has also been a volunteer cop.

"When I was new, it was the best time of my life. I got to go out there and wear a white hat and help people and make a difference in my community, one little piece at a time," Ball says. "That's a very, very fulfilling thing to do."

This is real police work. On one occasion, Ball had to pull his gun on a guy threatening a woman with a knife.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

In Sentencing Phase, Prosecutors Say Tsarnaev Is 'Unrepentant And Unchanged'

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is "unrepentant and unchanged."

That's what a prosecutor told jurors on Tuesday as they weighed whether the 21-year-old convicted in the bombings that killed three people and left 264 others wounded should get the death penalty.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports that the prosecution presented jurors with four large portraits of the victims and one photo of Tsarnaev giving the middle finger to a security camera in his jail cell.

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It's All Politics
3:33 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

In Latest Outbreak Of Bipartisanship, Senate Compromises On Trafficking Bill

Sen. Mitch McConnell (right) walks with Sen. John Barrasso to a news conference about the compromise Tuesday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 7:53 pm

A logjam over an anti-human trafficking bill has finally broken in the Senate. Senate negotiators reached a deal after a long impasse over language on abortion funding. The compromise clears the path to a confirmation vote for attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch — a vote Republicans had delayed until after the trafficking bill gets resolved.

It took about six weeks, but the Senate deal on human trafficking was the latest outbreak of bipartisanship in a month that's seen compromises on Iran, Medicare and education.

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