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12:55 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Singer Emeli Sande Shares Her 'Version Of Events'

Emeli Sande's debut album Our Version of Events
Simon Emmett/ Lauren Dukoff The Fun Star

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:14 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 17, 2013.

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

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Middle East
12:46 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Conflict Transforms Syrian English Teacher Into War Photographer

Nour Kelze, a 25-year-old from Aleppo, Syria, was teaching English at a private school when the uprising started two years ago. Since then, she has learned to be a war photographer and has been sending photos to the Reuters news agency.
Stephanie Freid Courtesy of Nour Kelze

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 11:33 am

Syria's war has thrown ordinary citizens into situations they never could have imagined and changed them in ways they never would have dreamed. It's turned carpenters, engineers and doctors into armed rebels. And in Aleppo, it has turned a young female teacher into a war photographer.

We first met Nour Kelze back in October, on our first trip to Aleppo. We asked her to work with us as an interpreter. She agreed but said she also would be shooting pictures.

Kelze, 25, had been teaching English and only recently became a war photographer.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Is Russia Marked For Meteors?

A hole in the ice of Chebarkul Lake where a meteor reportedly struck the lake near Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow
AP

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 6:53 am

Russians might be forgiven for thinking they have a big, fat celestial bull's-eye painted on their heads.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Educators Killed At Sandy Hook School Honored At White House

President Obama with Donna and Carlos Soto, who accepted the Presidential Citizens Medal awarded to their daughter, slain Sandy Hook teacher Victoria Soto.
Shawn Thew EPA /LANDOV

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

It's Out Of Here: Asteroid Whizzes By

An illustration of what asteroid 2012 DA 14 may look like as it approaches Earth.
NASA/JPL-CalTech EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:46 pm

Update at 2:25 p.m. ET. Asteroid Has Passed By:

According to NASA, asteroid 2012 DA14 — a rock thought to be about 150 feet across and the weight of about 318 fully loaded Boeing 747s — just flew past the planet.

So, we're all safe.

Update at 3:43 p.m. ET. A Photograph:

NASA has released this photograph of 2012 DA14:

Our original post and earlier updates:

If you haven't heard by now, then we've got some perhaps unsettling news:

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Airbus Pulls Lithium-Ion Battery Out Of Its A350

A tail of an Airbus long-haul A350 XWB under construction at the European aircraft maker's assembly line in France.
AFP/Getty Images

Boeing's European rival Airbus announced a significant change to its A350-XWB airliner on Friday: It is abandoning plans to use a lithium-ion battery, the same kind that has caused Boeing so much trouble with its 787 Dreamliner.

The A350 is Airbus' version of the Dreamliner — a lighter, more fuel efficient plane made primarily out of a carbon fiber instead of aluminum and steel.

The New York Times explains:

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All Tech Considered
11:37 am
Fri February 15, 2013

DIY Broadband Comes To The English Countryside

iStockphoto.com

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The Record
11:28 am
Fri February 15, 2013

A Brief History Of The Grammy Sales Bump

Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons, winner of Album of the Year at the 2013 Grammy Awards. To date, the band's winning album, Babel, has sold 1,737,000 copies, according to Nielsen Soundscan.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:21 pm

As televised prize-givers, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences are slouches. The dozen prizes given out in a typical Grammy Awards telecast is the lowest of any major awards-show telecast, from the Oscars to the Emmys. NARAS gives out the bulk of its little gramophones in an untelevised ceremony.

But as sales-juicers? The Grammys are unparalleled.

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The Salt
11:18 am
Fri February 15, 2013

How To Make A Chinese New Year-Worthy Potsticker

The finished dumplings, properly fried to a light crisp. The half-moon shape was meant to resemble ancient Chinese currency. Eating the dumplings was believed to bring fortune and prosperity.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 12:59 pm

Even though he estimates he's made hundreds of thousands of them, Scott Drewno says pork potstickers never get old. In fact, they are the food the executive chef of The Source by Wolfgang Puck, a fine dining Asian fusion restaurant in Washington, D.C., says he would take to a desert island.

"They're everything you want in a dish — salty, savory, filling," says Drewno, as he lovingly holds up one of three bowls of ground pork he planned to season and stuff into dumplings before our eyes.

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Movie Interviews
11:11 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Kushner's 'Lincoln' Is Strange, But Also Savvy

Tony Kushner based his screenplay for Lincoln in part on Doris Kearns Goodwin's biography of the president, Team of Rivals — but he read many other histories and biographies, in addition to Lincoln's own writings.
DreamWorks/Twentieth Century Fox

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 15, 2012.

Tony Kushner spent years writing the screenplay for Steven Spielberg's film Lincoln, but that wasn't the only heavy lifting he had to do. It also took some effort to overcome Daniel Day-Lewis' reluctance to play the title role.

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Movie Interviews
11:11 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Wes Anderson, Creating A Singular 'Kingdom'

Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Edward Norton and Bruce Willis star in the film — the story of a 12-year-old girl and boy who merge their imaginative worlds on an island off the coast of New England.
Focus Features

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 8:38 am

This interview was originally broadcast on May 29, 2012.

Director Wes Anderson has many credits to his name — The Royal Tenenbaums, The Darjeeling Limited, Bottle Rocket and Fantastic Mr. Fox among them — but Moonrise Kingdom was his first film to open the prestigious Cannes Film Festival.

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Theater
11:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

A New View Of Newton In 'Isaac's Eye'

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:14 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Anyone who's taken a high school science class knows the name Isaac Newton. You remember this tale: He's sitting under a tree, an apple falls on his head, he figures out gravity, or so the story goes. Not really true.

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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Fri February 15, 2013

After Outrage, Benjamin Netanyahu's Ice Cream Budget Melts Away

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu heads the weekly cabinet meeting in his office on February 10 in Jerusalem, Israel.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 7:42 am

It is perhaps one of the more frivolous stories out of the Middle East; still, it's tasty, so we'll tell you about it: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has angered his opponents by budgeting 10,000 Shekels ($2,716) to buy ice cream for his household.

As The Guardian reports, the news came at an inconvenient time for Netanyahu's coalition government: They had just proposed an austerity budget that cut benefits for public workers.

The Guardian adds:

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The Checkout: Live
10:17 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Orrin Evans: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Pianist Orrin Evans performs at 92Y Tribeca as part of WBGO's The Checkout Live concert series.
John Rogers johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 10:20 am

The pianist Orrin Evans splits much of his time between Philadelphia, where he grew up, and New York, a much larger jazz scene where he gigs often. A hard-charging player, seasoned with the harmonic touch of fellow Philadelphian McCoy Tyner, Evans is in high demand in a lot of places. Last year saw him release his 19th album as a bandleader or co-leader, Flip the Script. It's a trio recording, a format which both intimidates and excites him; here, he takes up the three-man challenge anew.

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Author Interviews
10:16 am
Fri February 15, 2013

'Immortal' Cells Of Henrietta Lacks Live On In Labs

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 11:03 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Dec. 13, 2010.

The HeLa cell line — one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research — has played a part in some of the world's most important medical advances, from the polio vaccine to in vitro fertilization.

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Food
10:16 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Sometimes, Food Additives Are Pretty Innocuous

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 11:03 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
10:16 am
Fri February 15, 2013

How To 'Thrive': Short Commutes, More Happy Hours

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"Many of us spend more than half our waking hours at work," writes Buettner. So he recommends you find the right job, limit your workweek to 40 hours, take vacations and go to happy hour for some satisfying socializing.

Richard Hume

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 11:03 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 19, 2011.

Many people believe that happiness comes from money or youth or beauty, but Dan Buettner would respectfully disagree. Buettner visited some of the happiest places on Earth and argues that the real keys to happiness lie in fundamental, permanent changes to the way we live.

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Around the Nation
10:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

The State of Indian Country: Global Tribes?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Religion
10:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Keeping The Faith In The Catholic Church

Earlier this week, Pope Benedict XVI announced that he would be retiring from his position, but he's not the only prominent Catholic stepping down. Host Michel Martin speaks with top Catholic lobbyist and policy adviser, John Carr, about his own retirement and what's next for him and the Church.

Barbershop
10:02 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Who Really Benefits From Raising Minimum Wage?

President Obama argued for raising the minimum wage in his State of the Union address, but will it really help keep up with the cost of living? And the manhunt for Christopher Dorner kept the country on its toes for a week. Now that it's over, what questions remain? Host Michel Martin and the guys weigh in.

The Two-Way
9:59 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Venezuelan Government Releases Chávez Photos, Says He's On Breathing Tube

A handout picture made available Friday by the Venezuelan Ministry of Communications and Information shows Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and his daughters Rosa Virginia (right) and Maria Gabriela reading an edition of Cuban daily Granma, as he recovers from cancer surgery. It was reportedly taken on Thursday.
EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 11:34 am

The Venezuelan government has released photographs of ailing President Hugo Chávez, who has not made a public appearance since he left for Cuba in December.

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Race
9:36 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Why Do People Sympathize With Christopher Dorner?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we've heard President Obama's State of the Union speech, but what about the state of Indian Nations? We'll hear more about the message from Indian Country in just a few minutes.

But first we turn to Los Angeles, where the hunt for former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner is now over. Dorner's remains have now been positively identified after they were removed from the mountain cabin that burned down after a fiery standoff with authorities.

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Grad Who Sued Over C+ Grade Flunks In Court

Megan Thode, who lost her case against Lehigh University.
Donna Fisher/The Morning Call MCT /Landov

The latest person to sue a university over a "bad" grade has failed to make her case.

As the Allentown, Pa., Morning Call reports, "a Northampton County judge on Thursday rejected the claims of a Lehigh University graduate suing over her C+ grade, a verdict that upheld the school's insistence that she earned the mark she got."

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All Songs Considered
8:44 am
Fri February 15, 2013

New Music By Wormed: In Space, No One Can Hear You Growl

Wormed.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 2:43 pm

In its quest to become the world's most brutal, ugly and offensive death-metal act, a young band should ask itself three questions: "How fast can the drummer blast-beat?" "How many unspeakable acts can we cram into three minutes, lyrically speaking?" "Are the riffs-per-second an accurate measure of how brutal we truly are?" I'm only sort of kidding. These exercises in ridiculousness are par for the course, though their excess is not unrewarded. Enter Wormed.

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The Two-Way
8:38 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Why Did So Many Russian Drivers Get Such Great Meteor Videos?

One of the dashcam videos recorded Friday when a meteor appeared over Russia.
RussiaToday

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 9:58 am

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Law
8:34 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Attorney Advocates For Poor As Immigration Debate Continues

Jose Pertierra is an immigration lawyer from Cuba. He is well-known for defending Elian Gonzalez and works on behalf of refugees.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

As Washington debates changing the immigration system, the demand for immigration attorneys has already jumped, even without new laws in place.

Lawyers such as Jose Pertierra, a veteran immigration attorney, are trained to interpret the law, but Pertierra sees his role as much more.

Every Thursday at 6 p.m. for the past 10 years, Pertierrra is here — on the set of the Spanish language TV studios of Univision in Washington, D.C., near Capitol Hill. He does a segment on immigration where he answers viewers' questions.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
8:23 am
Fri February 15, 2013

It's All Politics, Feb. 14, 2013

Charles Dharapak DPA/Landov
  • Listen to the Roundup

Mr. Speaker, The Podcast of the United States! NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving dissect President Obama's State of the Union address, make the obligatory and sophomoric quench-filling jokes about Marco Rubio and look at what seems to be the makings of a filibuster against Defense Secretary-nominee Chuck Hagel.

Monkey See
8:12 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Justin Timberlake, LL Cool J And The Presidency

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show was taped while Stephen and I were still recovering from live-blogging the Grammy Awards on Sunday night, so that was still fresh in our minds. Trey and Glen saw the show as well, so we spend some time this week talking about the awards, the performances, and whether we learned anything. You will experience my new way of tormenting Stephen, and perhaps you'll want to join in!

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:53 am
Fri February 15, 2013

A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem

Courtesy of Fake Is The New Real

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 12:26 pm

Let's pretend. Let's pretend that politics doesn't matter, politicians don't matter, history doesn't matter, nostalgia doesn't matter, emotion doesn't matter, habit doesn't matter, romance doesn't matter, prejudice doesn't matter — all that matters is good old rational, mathematical, look-at-the-numbers common sense.

And now let's look at the Electoral College.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Fri February 15, 2013

'Cruise From Hell' Was A Mix Of 'Survivor' And 'Lord Of The Flies'

After finally getting off the Carnival cruise ship Triumph, this passenger waited for a ride early Friday in Mobile, Ala.
Mark Wallheiser EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:22 pm

As they finally came off the Carnival cruise ship Triumph late Thursday and early Friday in Mobile, Ala., passengers from the ill-fated cruise told stories that call to mind TV's Survivor and literature's classic Lord of the Flies, the Los Angeles Times writes.

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