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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
2:07 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

The Movie Gillian Anderson Has 'Seen A Million Times'

A scene from the animated film Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa.
Dreamworks AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 3:25 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama In Oklahoma: 'You Are Not Alone'

President Obama is greeted as he tours a tornado affected area on Sunday in Moore, Oklahoma.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama toured the devastation in Moore, Okla. Sunday afternoon, comforting some victims and pledging federal support. He said that he came to city as a representative of the American people.

"I'm just a messenger here," Obama said, "letting everybody know that you are not alone."

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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Four Rockets Strike Hezbollah Strongholds In Lebanon

Lebanese men inspect destroyed cars after two rockets exploded in Shiah, a southern suburb of Beirut, on Sunday.
Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:39 am

Four rockets hit areas of Beirut, Lebanon that are controlled by Hezbollah on Sunday. The attacks came hours after the leader of the militant group, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, vowed to continue its fight to keep Syrian president Bashar Assad in power.

As the AP reports, Lebanon and Syria have a similar sectarian divide. The wire service reports:

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Justice Department Told News Corp. About Fox Subpoena In 2010

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:29 pm

Fox News officials professed indignation and surprise last week over the search of reporter James Rosen's records amid a federal leak investigation

But prosecutors told Fox's parent company of a subpoena nearly three years ago.

Prosecutors issued a subpoena for Rosen's phone records and got a judge to sign off on a sealed warrant for his emails back in May 2010.

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Books
8:35 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Women Who Inspired Other Women With 'Mary Tyler Moore'

The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in 1970.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:26 am

In the '60s, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural — think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than four decades years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

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The Two-Way
8:30 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Japan's ANA Puts Its 787 Dreamliners Back In Service

All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 Dreamliner takes off from Chitose airport in Hokkaido, northern Japan, for Tokyo's Haneda airport on Sunday.
Jiji Press AFP/Getty Images

Japan's All Nippon Airways put its fleet of Boeing 787s back in service Sunday. If you remember, the Dreamliners were grounded for four months after two separate airplanes had issues with their batteries overheating.

The BBC reports that the first Dreamliner flight landed at Tokyo's Haneda airport after a short flight from Sapporo today. The BBC adds:

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Women Who Inspired Other Women With 'Mary Tyler Moore'

The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in 1970.
AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 8:22 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. A new book about the Mary Tyler Moore Show focuses on the women behind the scenes of the show that's still inspiring women today.

The Two-Way
7:26 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Report Raises Questions About Rutgers' New Athletic Director

Julie Hermann talks to the media after being introduced as Rutgers University athletic director on May 15, 2013 in Piscataway, New Jersey.
Rich Schultz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 9:58 am

Struggling to emerge from the shadow of Mike Rice — the men's basketball coach fired after video showed him assaulting his players — Rutgers hired Julie Hermann, a new athletic director the school hopes would make things better.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:01 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Why Jazz Musicians Love 'The Rite Of Spring'

Flutist Hubert Laws is one of many jazz artists to have recorded an adaptation of themes from The Rite of Spring.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:05 am

A 100-year-old ballet, composed by a Russian for a French audience, has become something of a jazz standard.

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The Two-Way
5:44 am
Sun May 26, 2013

As Recovery Continues, Obama Heads To Oklahoma

Southmoore High School senior Jake Spradling hugs a classmate as they get ready to attend their commencement ceremony in Oklahoma City on Saturday.
Charlie Riedel AP

President Obama is scheduled to visit the city of Moore, Okla., today, to survey the devastation left behind by by a monster EF-5 tornado.

The AP reports:

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Middle East
5:13 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Syrian Opposition Faces Expanding, Volatile Conflict

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:38 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Portnoy's Complaint': A Surprisingly Therapeutic Birthday Present

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 9:41 am

Lucas Mann's latest book is called Class A: Baseball in the Middle of Everywhere.


ADVISORY: This essay contains sexual content and strong language that some readers may find offensive.

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From Our Listeners
5:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Compromise' And 'The F'

iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 3:25 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read The Art of Compromise by Lindsey Appleford of Boerne, Texas, and Claudia Who Found the F by Sean Enfield of Denton, Texas. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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Three-Minute Fiction
5:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Art Of Compromise

iStockPhoto.com

"It's just not here," Erin announced as she rifled through the last cookbook. She held the book apart by its front and back covers, gave the fanned pages a shake. "If I could just remember the magazine I found the recipe in, maybe I could get a copy off the internet." Erin worried her lower lip between her teeth as she often did when trying to recollect a memory just out of mind's reach. It was a habit Jeremy still found endearing.

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Three-Minute Fiction
5:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Claudia Who Found The F

iStockPhoto.com

July 25th, the sun washes over Blossem, and the Texas heat seeps into my blood stream. Every day prior to this, it only beat against my flesh, turning me darker shades of tan and giving the illusion that I was actually my mother's daughter and not just a light-skinned replacement. Today, though, as I head to work, I could feel the rays moving with my blood, and I could see my skin glow.

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Author Interviews
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Brilliant Minds' Behind 'Mary Tyler Moore'

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:08 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural - think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than 35 years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

Read more
Politics
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama Administration Turns Attention Toward Africa

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was in the capital of Ethiopia this weekend. He was attending the 50th anniversary summit of the African Union, and he was laying the groundwork for President Obama's trip to Africa in the next month. Our East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner is in Addis Ababa. He joins us now. Hi, Greg. Thanks for being with us.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, you spent the day with the secretary. How was he received?

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National Security
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Ex-Obama Adviser On Plan To Limit Drones: Why Did We Wait?

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

President Obama gave a major speech Thursday intended to narrow the scope of the U.S. fight against terrorism. He addressed the administration's much-criticized drone program. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Adm. Dennis Blair, who was Obama's top intelligence adviser from 2009 to 2010, and a vocal critic of the administration's drone campaign.

The Deadly Tornado In Moore, Okla.
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Tornado Upends Okla. Doctor's Practice With Patients In Need

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

Dr. Keith Layne's practice was destroyed in the tornado that hit Moore, Okla. Now the family practice doctor is scrambling to treat patients while worrying about their mental and physical health.

Around the Nation
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

How To Rebuild: Advice From One Disaster-Hit City To Another

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 6:03 am

Host Rachel Martin speaks with John Janssen, who was a City Council member in Greensburg, Kan., when that small town was devastated by a tornado in 2007. He offers his advice for residents of Moore, Okla.

National Security
4:55 am
Sun May 26, 2013

What's Changed Since U.S. Last Moved Detainees To Yemen

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

Host Rachel Martin talks with Greg Johnsen, author of The Last Refuge: Yemen, al-Qaeda, and America's War in Arabia. They discuss President Obama's plan to restart prisoner transfers of Yemeni detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison.

Sunday Puzzle
4:30 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Investigating The Crime Scene

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 1:21 pm

On-air challenge: Today's theme is "C.S.I." — as in the name of the long-running TV show. You're given three words starting with the letters C, S and I. For each set, give a fourth word that can follow each of the original words to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

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All Tech Considered
4:11 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Spy Novel Meets Game In Flawed (But Beautiful) New E-book

The Thirty-Nine Steps, the spy thriller that introduces the valiant, veld-trained Richard Hannay, has been reborn as an interactive. The new e-book/game is a production of The Story Mechanics.
Courtesy The Story Mechanics

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 4:58 am

This is the first in an occasional series of e-book reviews, co-produced by NPR Books and All Tech Considered, focusing on creative combinations of technology and literature.

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A Blog Supreme
4:03 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Rites Of Swing: Jazz And Stravinsky

Cover art to Phil Woods' Rights Of Swing, 1961.
Candid Records

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:00 am

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Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

A Spy's Son Grapples With A Lifetime Of Secrets

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:13 am

When Scott Johnson was a kid, he wasn't really sure what his dad did; he was either a teacher, a diplomat or a foreign service officer.

But one morning, when Johnson was 14, his father decided to tell him his real job: He was a spy for the CIA.

At first it was exciting, but as Johnson grew older, he began to wonder just how much his father was keeping from him. He tells the story of their complicated relationship in a new memoir called The Wolf and the Watchman.

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The Salt
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Picnicking Through The Ages

An illustration of noblemen enjoying a picnic, from a French edition of The Hunting Book of Gaston Phebus, 15th century.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 1:56 pm

Whether a shepherd, an explorer, a hunter or a fairgoer, people have been eating outside since the beginning of time.

"The dictionaries confirm the word 'picnic' first surfaced in the 18th century, so we were picnicking before we had the term," says research librarian and food historian Lynne Olver, who runs the Food Timeline website.

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History
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Orphaned' By World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers

Paratrooper William John McLean II died on his son's second birthday. William McLean III is now 70.
Courtesy of William McLean III

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:48 pm

Memorial Day commemorates those who died serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. For some Americans, the day revives their few and fading memories of their fallen fathers. Those who lost a father in World War II are considered "war orphans." These are the stories of three of those children who have lived nearly all their lives without their dads.

A Voice From Heaven

Geraldine Conway Morenski holds onto a few distant memories of her dad: picking her up out of her crib, laughing, playing with her in the backyard.

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Around the Nation
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Indianapolis Speedway Needs Boost, But With Taxpayer Funds?

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has approved $100 million in bonds to repair the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 11:24 am

Sunday is the 97th running of the Indianapolis 500, which draws hundreds of thousands of fans to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. While it's an economic boon for the area, the 104-year-old track needs renovations — and just how it's getting the money is rubbing some Hoosiers the wrong way.

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Around the Nation
3:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Rebuilding Storm-Damaged New Jersey, One Boardwalk At A Time

People walk on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J., on Friday. The Jersey Shore beaches officially opened for the summer, after rebuilding following the destruction left behind by Superstorm Sandy last fall. The storm caused $37 billion of damage in the state.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 12:00 pm

When Hurricane Sandy swept through New Jersey last year, it destroyed many homes and businesses. It also obliterated the boardwalks that are the center of social and economic life in the towns.

In the months since, many of these towns have rushed to rebuild their boardwalks, but not everyone thinks the money has been well spent.

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Code Switch
3:48 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Job Searching While Black: What's Behind The Unemployment Gap?

A man interviews for a job in Detroit. The unemployment rate for black Americans in Michigan was 18.7 percent in 2012, more that twice the rate for whites in the state.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 4:04 pm

In the classic American story, opportunity is always in front of you. You finish school, find a job, buy a home and start a family; it's a rosy dreamscape.

But that world is one-dimensional. Income inequality is just about as American as baseball and apple pie. And though the economy has improved in the past few years, the unemployment rate for black Americans, now 13.2 percent, is about double that for white Americans.

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