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Shots - Health News
7:19 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Teen Girls' Yen For Indoor Tans Sparks Battle Over Risks

Almost one-third of white high school girls say they seek out indoor tans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:50 am

Teenage girls remain big fans of tans.

So a report in JAMA Internal Medicine that found about a third of white high school girls indulge in indoor tans wasn't exactly startling. What was a bit startling was how the tanning industry responded, saying, in effect, that we should be worrying more about skin cancer in middle-aged men, not girls.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Not Funny: Clerk Critically Injured In Hasselhoff Sign Theft

One of the promotional images for Cumberland Farms' "Iced Hoffee."
Cumberland Farms' Facebook page

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:22 am

What's been a relatively amusing trend in New England — the theft in the past year of more than 550 advertising signs featuring actor David Hasselhoff — isn't funny anymore.

A clerk who works at a Cumberland Farms convenience store in Shelton, Conn., "remains in critical condition after falling while trying to stop an SUV from driving away with stolen David Hasselhoff signs," The Hartford Courant says.

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Middle East
6:54 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Syrian Government Accused In Gas Attacks On Civilians

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

35-Year Sentence For Bradley Manning

U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade, Md., on Tuesday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 12:31 pm

Update at 10:18 a.m. ET. 35 Years:

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who was responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, was sentenced by a military judge to 35 years in prison Wednesday, according to reporters covering the trial at Fort Meade, Md. He'll get about 3 1/2 years' credit for time he's already spent behind bars.

More details (added at 10:30 a.m. ET):

-- Manning is also to be dishonorably discharged.

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Business
6:17 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Lowes Reports Earnings On The Heels Of Home Depot

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Home Depot says it has had "one of the best quarters in its recent history." It credits the recovery in the housing market. Main rival Lowes also benefited from the housing recovery, and strong demand for home refurbishings.

Parallels
5:30 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Japan Projects A More Assertive Image To The World

A Japanese tank fires during an annual training exercise at the foot of Mount Fuji in on Tuesday.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 12:22 pm

Japan's military held large-scale exercises at the foot of Mount Fuji on Tuesday as Minister of Defense Itsunori Onodera cited "deepening uncertainties" in the region as justification for expanding the role of Japan's armed forces at home and abroad.

Onodera said Japan's military would increasingly be called upon to participate in international peacekeeping operations and bilateral activities with allies.

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The Record
5:28 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Marian McPartland, 'Piano Jazz' Host, Has Died

Marian McPartland.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 2:23 pm

Marian McPartland, who gave the world an intimate, insider's perspective on one of the most elusive topics in music — jazz improvisation — died of natural causes Tuesday night at her home in Long Island, N.Y. She was 95.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Wed August 21, 2013

School Clerk In Georgia Persuaded Gunman To Lay Down Weapons

Laterrica Luther holds the hand of her 6-year-old nephew, Jaden Culpepper, as students from the Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy arrive on buses to waiting loved ones in a Walmart parking lot in Decatur, Ga., on Tuesday. A gunman had entered the students' school earlier in the day. No one was hurt.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:45 am

Tuesday's terrifying incident at an elementary school near Atlanta — in which a gunman with an assault rifle and other weapons entered the building — ended with no one being hurt after a school clerk apparently spent about an hour talking to the young man. She says she persuaded him to put down his gun and surrender.

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The Two-Way
5:24 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Book News: Barnes & Noble Founder Pulls Plug On Buyback Plan

A Barnes & Noble store in Bethel Park, Pa.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 7:19 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Raymond Carver And His Editor Re-Imagined In 'Scissors'

Stephane Michaka is a French writer.
Elisa Pone Random House

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 6:04 pm

The legendary minimalist short story writer Raymond Carver distilled the last decade of his life in his poem "Gravy." "Gravy, these past ten years," he writes. "Alive, sober, working, loving, and being loved by a good woman."

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The Two-Way
4:41 am
Wed August 21, 2013

New Reports Of Chemical Weapons In Syria; Many May Be Dead

Free Syrian Army fighters man an anti-aircraft gun on the back of a truck in Deir al-Zor on Tuesday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:14 am

(We most recently updated this post at 9:10 a.m. ET.)

"Two Syrian pro-opposition groups are claiming that dozens of people were killed Wednesday in a poisonous gas attack near Damascus," NPR's Jean Cochran reported earlier this morning on our Newscast. The groups are blaming the attack on government forces, she said.

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Remembrances
3:31 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Crime Novelist Elmore Leonard Dies At 87

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Elmore Leonard, sometimes called the Dickens of Detroit, created some of the most memorable characters in modern crime fiction. The 87-year-old writer died after suffering a stroke several weeks ago. Until then, he had never stopped writing. His first book, published in 1953, was a Western. Later, he turned to crime novels and left an indelible imprint on that genre. NPR's Lynn Neary has this remembrance.

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Around the Nation
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Efforts Continue To Remove San Diego Mayor From Office

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There are alarming reports from Syria this morning of a chemical weapons attack near the capital. Syrian opposition activists say government forces have killed hundreds of people in air raids and shelling on rebel neighborhoods close to Damascus and a sizeable number of people, they claim, have died from poison gas. Those claims have not been confirmed and the Syrian government has strongly denied the accusations.

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Business
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

U.S. Retailers Vow To Upgrade Bangladesh's Safety Standards

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Some of America's biggest retailers announced new steps yesterday aimed at improving safety standards in Bangladesh's troubled garment industry. Wal-Mart and the Gap were among the companies that formed a group called the Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety after the deadliest accident ever in the garment industry.

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Around the Nation
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Colorado Gold Mine Bucks Closing Trend

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's stay in Colorado to hear about another business traditional to the West - gold mining. After peaking a couple of years ago, the price of gold has fallen dramatically, which has forced many gold mines to close. Bucking that trend is the largest mine in Colorado - and it's expanding aggressively, taking the long view. From Colorado Public Radio, Ben Markus reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF BULLDOZER)

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Television
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Al Jazeera Offers Americans An Alternative For News

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Among the news organizations following every development in Egypt is Al Jazeera. And now they are making a bit of news of their own. Al Jazeera America went on air yesterday afternoon, entering the crowded and competitive world of cable TV news in the United States. The new network is available in about 45 million households.

But as NPR's David Folkenflik reports, there are many people inside the industry skeptical that its promise of thoughtful and serious news coverage will woo American audiences.

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Business
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Math Class: Oreo's Double Stuf Doesn't Measure Up

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is a bit of confectionery math: one plus one equals 1.86.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now you may remember the minor scandal that was kicked up when it was proved that Subway's foot-long sandwiches were actually less than a foot long.

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Business
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Earnings Report On Home Depot And J.C. Penney

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some home improvement.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Home Depot says it had one of the best quarters in recent history. The number behind that claim, a 17 percent jump in earnings this past quarter. The company credited the recovering housing market in the U.S. and said spending by both contractors and regular customers was up.

Middle East
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Since Crackdown In Egypt, Muslim Brotherhood's Support Wanes

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Middle East
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Egypt's Political Crisis Is Creating Economic Trouble

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The crisis in Egypt has been devastating for that country's economy, and especially for businesses in Cairo. Shops that usually stay open late into the night are closing early because of a curfew imposed by the military. Many foreign companies have stopped operations altogether. For the time being, economists say that Egypt can avoid collapse with the help of a multi-billion dollar aid package from Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries.

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Middle East
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

U.S. Discusses What To Do With Aid To Egypt

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The political crisis in Egypt could be on the verge of yet another dramatic turn: A judge in Cairo just ordered that former dictator Hosni Mubarak be released from jail.

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National Security
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Britain Tried To Stop NSA Material From Being Published

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:27 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Museum Raises Money To Save 'Rosie The Riveter' Plant

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Rosie the Riveter, with one of the most famous clenched fists in American history, embodied the message of hardworking women during World War II: We Can Do It. Now a nonprofit is hoping to carry on that legacy. In a little more than a month, the historic Michigan factory where Rosie and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers could face the wrecking ball. That's unless the Yankee Air Museum can raise enough money to salvage part of that massive plant.

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The Two-Way
2:41 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Kodak Reinvents Itself As Judge Approves Bankruptcy Exit

Guy Solimano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:54 am

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Allan Gropper has approved Kodak's plan to emerge from court oversight. That paves the way for it to be a much smaller company focused on commercial and packaging printing.

The plan received the judge's approval on Tuesday, and the company hopes to put it into effect as soon as Sept. 3, reports Kate O'Connell of member station WXXI in Rochester, N.Y.

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The Salt
1:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Young Farmers Break The Bank Before They Get To The Field

Eva Teague, 31, is trying to start her own pig farm in Colorado but is running into financial obstacles typical of many young farmers trying to break into the business.
Luke Runyon KUNC/Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 11:29 am

As the average age of the American farmer has crept up to 60, fewer young people are filling in the ranks behind them. That's prompted some to ask if young people even want to farm anymore.

The quick answer is yes, just not in the same numbers as they used to. And surveys indicate many of them don't want to farm in conventional ways.

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Sweetness And Light
1:05 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Tennis Fans: A Stadium Roof Is Coming. So Is Regis Philbin

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

The ugliest, most ill-conceived physical addition to sports scenery was the construction, a few years ago, of the Arthur Ashe tennis stadium at the U.S. Open. Typical U.S. supersize. We'll be bigger than everyone else, so there.

Alas, in the upper reaches of this charmless behemoth you need a GPS to find the players somewhere down there at sea level. Worse, should it rain, which it has a wont to do in New York, there are no players on the court and you get wet.

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Sports
1:04 am
Wed August 21, 2013

With An Urban Face-Lift, Vintage Bike Polo Picks Up Speed

Jacob Newborn takes a shot past Lodewijk Broekhuizen (left) during a bike polo practice session in Milwaukee.
Morry Gash AP

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:54 am

Several vintage sports have seen resurgence among young people lately: roller derby, kickball and even bocce ball. But one century-old sport hasn't just found new fans; it's getting an urban makeover.

Welcome to hardcourt bike polo. On a hot, sunny day in Roseville, Minn., the second day of the 2013 North American Hardcourt Bike Polo Championship is about to begin.

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Millennials and The Changing Car Culture
1:03 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Why Millennials Are Ditching Cars And Redefining Ownership

Zach Brown's preferred mode of transportation is his skateboard. Brown, 27, is an artist and actor who doesn't own a car.
Courtesy of Zach Brown

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:30 am

Part of a series of stories produced in collaboration with Youth Radio on the changing car culture in America.

You might think there's one place in America you absolutely need a car: Los Angeles. You'd be wrong.

"I have been in L.A. without a car for two years now," says Alyssa Rosenthal, a makeup artist.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:02 am
Wed August 21, 2013

At 1963 March, A Face In The Crowd Became A Poster Child

Edith Lee-Payne doesn't remember having her photo taken at the March on Washington. What she does remember about that day, she says, is being "glad to be standing with people who wanted to make things right."
Rowland Scherman

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 2:47 pm

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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