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The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Grain Deaths Fall In 2012 But Industry Share Grows

John Poole NPR

A new report from grain safety researchers at Purdue University says eight people died while trapped in grain last year, another steep drop from the record year of 2010, when 31 people lost their lives in grain bins and other grain storage facilities.

The continued decline in incidents since 2010 is credited to drier and smaller harvests since then. The grain stored in bins in 2010 was generally harvested wet and tended to spoil and clog. Workers and farmers went into bins to unclog grain and were trapped in a "quicksand" effect common in flowing grain.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Why Being Stuck On A Tarmac With The Philly Orchestra Rocks

Artists from the Philadelphia Orchestra perform at the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, capital of China.
Luo Xiaoguang Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:28 am

There are few things as annoying as being stuck on a tarmac — in a cramped, packed plane — for long periods of time. But when you have some of the members of the Philadelphia Orchestra on your flight, it could turn magical.

No, seriously.

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Shots - Health News
11:53 am
Fri June 7, 2013

An Artist's Brush Reveals Tales Of Struggle And Survival

Alisa Hughley's brother Carey Hughley III was murdered at 21 by a person with untreated paranoid schizophrenia. Because she knew that he had chosen to be an organ donor, she was able to convince her grieving parents to approve the donations. "I was able to allay my parents' concerns," she says. "He was able to save four lives."
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:36 pm

Most health policy meetings are a dull gray snooze of business suits talking data. They seem a million miles removed from making sick people healthy. But this week in Washington, D.C., some of those meetings was enlivened by a sudden flash of color.

The back of one woman's suit jacket bore a painting, a Renoir-like portrait of a mother and child. A man's blazer showed him reborn after years of despair. Another woman's jacket portrayed a young man holding his organ donor card. A petite redhead's jacket blazed with a scarlet letter "A."

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Reports: Husband Cleared, Wife Arrested In Latest Ricin Case

There's been an arrest by federal authorities who are trying to track down the person responsible for last month mailing possibly ricin-laced letters to President Obama, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and a gun control group the mayor supports.

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The Salt
11:40 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Hold The Hot Dog: National Park Visitors Can Feast On Bison Burgers

Stefan Larsson serves up bison sloppy Joes and juniper-smoked bison tenderloin, which will be offered at the Yellowstone National Park this summer. Each park will have different menus featuring local foods.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 6:29 pm

The director of the National Park Service doesn't have anything against hot dogs or pizza being served in eateries in national parks.

"But I wanted more options, and more healthy choices," Jonathan Jarvis told me at a tasting event this week to unveil new standards for the concessionaires who operate more than 250 food and beverage operations in national parks.

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Three-Minute Fiction
11:25 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Picked Clean

iStockphoto.com

She found her brother's finger in the grass by the shed.

The grass glistened with the morning dew, but the finger did not.

She picked it up. She had seen it fall. He'd been running for the house, away from the toolshed, and he'd been holding onto the finger and onto the space where the finger had been, and despite his concentration, and in his haste, he had let go of the one to hold on tighter to the other.

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Three-Minute Fiction
11:24 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Chips

iStockphoto.com

The door slam is meant to be symbolic, I can tell, one last "take that!" in our roiling argument. But that door never did fit right in the frame, so it swings back open, revealing the heel of his departing shoe and the flick of his coat as he swings around the corner. I hear his footfalls stop, and imagine him pondering a return to slam the door, for real this time.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Poll: Americans, Chinese Harbor Mutual Suspicions

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:05 pm

As President Obama and his Chinese counterpart prepare for a weekend summit in California to discuss thorny bilateral issues, a new poll shows that ordinary Americans and Chinese increasingly eye one another with suspicion.

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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

California Nuclear Plant Slated For Permanent Shut Down

The San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station at San Onofre State Beach in a 2012 photo.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:54 am

California's San Onofre nuclear power plant will be shut down for good amid concerns as to whether it could be safely restarted after being offline since early last year because of a radiation leak.

The plant's operator, Southern California Edison, said in a statement Friday that San Onofre's twin reactors "had served the region for over 40 years" but that the 16 months of uncertainty about whether they would or wouldn't go back online "was not good for our customers, our investors or the need to plan for our region's long-term electricity needs."

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The Salt
10:47 am
Fri June 7, 2013

On National Doughnut Day, Free Food And Feel-Good History

The cover of the Salvation Army's War Cry magazine from 1918 commemorates the "Doughnut Girl."
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:43 am

We here at The Salt tend to look at themed food holidays with a heavy dose of skepticism. Most of these days sound more like marketing schemes than true reasons for a national day of remembrance.

So we were pleasantly surprised to learn that there is a bona fide historical reason to chow down on a deep-fried pastry today to mark National Doughnut Day.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Night Stalker' Richard Ramirez Dies In Prison

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:38 am

Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the Night Stalker, has died of natural causes in California, the AP reports, citing corrections officials.

KRON-TV reports that Ramirez was on death row in California's San Quentin prison. The station adds:

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Nobody Is Listening To Your Telephone Calls,' Obama Says

President Obama on Thursday in Mooresville, N.C.
Davis Turner EPA /LANDOV

In his most extensive comments so far on the revelations this week about the electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting, President Obama told the American people Friday that "nobody is listening to your telephone calls."

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'I Didn't Want To Be Pope,' Francis Tells Group Of Children

Pope Francis speaks with Jesuit school students Friday at the Vatican.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Speaking to a huge group of children Friday at the Vatican, Pope Francis pushed aside a set of prepared remarks to talk directly to them and answer some of their questions.

One of his frank responses to a girl named Teresa was this: "Anyone who wants to be Pope doesn't care much for themselves, God doesn't bless them. I didn't want to be Pope," reports Reuters.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Flooding Threatens Hungary As Central Europe Reels From Rain

An aerial view of the flooded Danube River in Deggendorf, Germany, on Friday.
Armin Weigel AP

Surging rivers in central Europe are threatening more people downstream, following heavy rains this week and a very sodden spring. After inundating Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland and Slovakia, the next area of danger appears to be Hungary.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban warned Friday that "it is now certain that we must face the largest-ever flood on the Danube, so we must be prepared for the worst," The Associated Press reported.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

As Tropical Storm Andrea Heads North, East Coast Is Drenched

A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours.
National Weather Service

The Eastern Seaboard is getting drenched this morning, as Tropical Storm Andrea moves north along the coast.

Check out this rainfall map put out by the Weather Prediction Center:

It shows that in the next 24 hours, a wide swath of the Mid-Atlantic will get hammered with about 3 inches of rain and New York may see close to 4 inches.

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Arts & Life
9:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Photo Staff Firings Won't Shake Pulitzer Winner's Focus

The Chicago Sun-Times made a surprise announcement last week: it fired its entire photography staff. Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist John White worked there for more than forty years. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about what this news means for him personally and the future of photojournalism.

Barbershop
9:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Is It A Surprise That The Government Is Monitoring Your Calls?

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Middle East
9:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Opposition Spokesman Won't Commit To Syria Peace Talks

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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BackTalk
9:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Senator Clarifies Alleged Ties To White Nationalist Group

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now it's time for Backtalk, that's the time when we hear from you. Editor Ahmad Omar is with us today. What is going on?

AHMAD OMAR: Celeste, we have a little clarification. In our political chat last week, we talked about a staff shakeup for South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley. The co-chair of her reelection committee resigned over connections to the Council of Conservative Citizens. The Southern poverty Law Center calls that a white nationalist group.

HEADLEE: The CCC.

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Economy
9:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Are There Jobs Out There For Recent Grads?

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we speak with a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who just lost his job after 44 years at the Chicago Sun-Times. But first, speaking of jobs, the latest figures are out from the Department of Labor. The U.S. economy added 175,000 jobs last month. That's the good news. The bad news is the unemployment rate rose to 7.6 percent. How does that math work? We're going to talk about that.

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NPR Story
9:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Strengthening Buildings In Tornado Alley

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Powerful storms this spring: tornadoes like the ones in Oklahoma have caused damage estimated in the billions of dollars and dozens of deaths. But does the destruction have to be so devastating? What are the engineering challenges to designing and building stronger, more tornado-resistant structures and providing better protection for the people who live there?

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The Two-Way
9:21 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Koreas Agree To Talks But Can't Decide What Kind Or Where

Tents at the Korean armistice conference in June 1951. Pyongyang stalled the talks by arguing over such minutiae as the height of chair legs.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:50 am

The two Koreas have agreed in principle to talks aimed at mending their almost nonexistent relations, but they are stalled on the question of where to meet.

South Korea has suggested that high-level talks take place in its capital, Seoul, but North Korea has countered that only lower-level negotiations should take place and they should be held in its border city of Kaesong.

The rival Koreas have not met face to face for such negotiations since February 2011.

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Economy
9:19 am
Fri June 7, 2013

No Big Waves In The Labor Pool

Shoppers walk along Broadway in New York City. Retailers added 28,000 in May amid signs of strength in consumer spending.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:44 am

June is a nice month for treading water — if you happen to be in a swimming pool.

But if you are in the labor pool and trying to make your way toward a job, a stronger current in the right direction would be appreciated.

Unfortunately, the jobs report released Friday by the Labor Department showed that the economy continues to drift along at a languid pace.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Shhh! World's Powerful People Are Meeting In Secret Again

What goes on up the road is only for those in the know to know: Police stood guard Thursday near the Grove Hotel in Watford, England, where "The Bilderberg" group is meeting this year.
Nick Ansell PA Photos /Landov

There's "no detailed agenda, no resolutions are proposed, no votes are taken, and no policy statements are issued."

And as The Associated Press says, "what happens at Bilderberg, stays at Bilderberg."

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
8:25 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Clare Fischer On Piano Jazz

Clare Fischer.
Courtesy of the artist

Keyboardist, composer, arranger and bandleader Clare Fischer was known for his versatile and deft touch with everything from classical to jazz to Latin and Brazilian music. He began his career after earning his Master's degree in composition from Michigan State University, where he worked as a pianist and conductor for the vocal group The Hi-Lo's. After working with The Hi-Lo's for five years, he went on to work with Dizzy Gillespie and Donald Byrd.

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TED Radio Hour
8:07 am
Fri June 7, 2013

What Are The Clues To A Good Story?

Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 8:28 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning. Earlier this episode, Stanton shared a story that does exactly that.

About Andrew Stanton

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Ask Me Another
8:06 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Lizz Winstead: The Dictionary From A To Lizz

Lizz Winstead. Her latest book of funny essays is Lizz Free Or Die.
Mindy Tucker

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 10:01 am

Lizz Winstead has an impressive resume. She's a veteran stand-up comic, co-created both The Daily Show and Air America Radio, and is the author of the book Lizz Free or Die. But Winstead is also a bonafide word nerd and game fanatic. Which means she was right at home on the Ask Me Another stage.

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TED Radio Hour
8:06 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Framing The Story

"I think stories are necessary, just as necessary as food and love. It's how we make meaning of our lives." — Chimamanda Adichie
TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 7:29 am

Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
7:17 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Oops! France's François Hollande Confuses China And Japan

French President François Hollande is welcomed by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prior to their meeting at Abe's official residence in Tokyo.
Toru Tamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 2:32 pm

It is as embarrassing a diplomatic gaffe as you can make: French President François Hollande was in the same room as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, this morning, when he offered the "Chinese people" condolences for the 10 citizens it lost during the Algerian hostage crisis in January.

The Guardian reports:

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Interviews
7:16 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'The Life That Follows' Disarming IEDs In Iraq

Brian Castner served as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1999 to 2007, deploying to Iraq to command bomb disposal units in Balad and Kirkuk in 2005 and 2006.
Joey Campagna Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:30 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 8, 2012.

Brian Castner arguably had one of the most nerve-wracking jobs in the U.S. military. He commanded two Explosive Ordnance Disposal units in Iraq, where his team disabled roadside IEDs, investigated the aftermath of roadside car bombings and searched door to door to uncover bomb-makers at their homes.

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