NPR News

Pages

Business
10:29 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Maybe 'Muddling Through' Isn't That Bad For The Economy

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:15 pm

When the global financial system started to collapse five years ago, leaders from the Treasury Department, Congress and the Federal Reserve jumped up and started running.

Like men on a burning wooden bridge, they raced along, making crazy-fast decisions. They seized Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, bailed out big banks, saved automakers, slashed interest rates and funded a massive infrastructure-building project to stimulate growth.

But that was then.

Read more
Code Switch
10:21 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Back To School, Back To Being The 'Only' One

What's your favorite, most poignant, uproarious story of being the odd person out?
Cristian Baitg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 1:41 pm

In August, we asked folks to share stories from moments when they've been the odd person out, the only one of their kind. We wanted to hear the uproariously funny and poignant stories that stuck in people's memories. And many of the memories that were shared came from the classroom. Below, you'll find some of our favorites — enjoy.

Rebecca Eng from Edinburgh:

Read more
Politics
10:09 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Rand Paul On Syria: 'I Think There's Evil On Both Sides'

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is a member of the Foreign Relations Committee.
U.S. Senate Photographic Studio Rand Paul

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 3:21 pm

Kentucky Republican Rand Paul is a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and one of Congress' leading skeptics of U.S. military strategy, including possible strikes on Syria. On Tuesday, he offered a detailed response to President Obama's speech about the Syrian crisis. Paul joins Michel Martin of Tell Me More to talk about his opposition to military action, and what the U.S. should do.

Read more
Books
10:09 am
Wed September 11, 2013

'Buck' Tells Of Wild Childhood In 'Killadelphia'

Author MK Asante
Lee Steffen Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 1:39 pm

Writer, hip-hop artist and filmmaker MK Asante's new memoir is called Buck. It's about growing up in North Philadelphia in the 1990s. Asante describes his adolescence as, "Me, unsupervised, with my brother gone, my dad gone, my mom gone, and me just on the block in the neighborhood, roaming the streets of Philly - just lost."

Buck captures Asante's transformation from a drug dealer and delinquent to a poet and professor.

Read more
Around the Nation
10:09 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Do Americans Feel A Responsibility To Act In Syria?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Parallels
10:06 am
Wed September 11, 2013

On Anniversary Of Benghazi Attack, Libya Still Struggles

People gather at the site of a car bombing in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday — one year to the date after an attack on the U.S. consulate in the city killed the ambassador and three other Americans.
Mohammed el-Shaiky AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 11:33 am

The deadly attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, which took place a year ago Wednesday, symbolized the violence, chaos and struggles that have defined Libya since the ousting of dictator Moammar Gadhafi two years ago.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:04 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Men Convicted In India Gang Rape To Be Sentenced Friday

During a demonstration Wednesday, Indian activists hold posters of the four men convicted in the New Delhi gang rape case that shocked the country.
Narinder Nanu AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:45 pm

The four men convicted of the New Delhi gang rape that took the life of a 23-year-old woman last December will learn their fate on Friday.

The court considered Wednesday whether they should get capital punishment or life in prison.

In sentencing arguments that stretched to three hours, public prosecutor Dayan Krishnan called on the court to impose the death penalty for what he called a "diabolical" crime.

Read more
It's All Politics
9:53 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Problem: The Path Forward In Syria Is No Clearer

President Obama walks out of a meeting with the Senate Democratic Caucus at the Capitol on Tuesday.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:08 pm

With the highly anticipated Syria speech behind him, the path ahead for President Obama's effort to get congressional authorization of military strikes in Syria is no easier than before. In fact, post-speech, it seems more obstacle-strewn and steeper than ever.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:38 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Series Reveals Underground Market For 'Re-Homing' Adoptees

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:40 pm

In an exhaustive, 18-month investigation, Reuters has detailed a practice in the U.S. of "private re-homing" of unwanted foreign adoptees and allegations of sexual and physical abuse at the hands of guardians.

In the five-part series "The Child Exchange: Inside America's underground market for adopted children," Reuters tracked down several adopted children who it says had been passed from one guardian to another through contacts made on groups on Yahoo and Facebook specializing in such re-homing.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:21 am
Wed September 11, 2013

If Verizon Sells A Record $49B In Bonds, Are Good Times Ahead?

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:22 am

The number is stunning:

"Verizon Communications could be taking on nearly $50 billion in new debt in a massive bond sale to help the telecom giant pay for its $130 billion acquisition of Verizon Wireless shares," writes USA Today.

Read more
Parallels
9:21 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Lessons From Libya On How To Destroy Chemical Weapons

President George W. Bush receives a tour of nuclear material surrendered by Libya and flown to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a U.S. facility in Oak Ridge, Tenn., in 2004.
Tim Sloan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:50 pm

When the U.S. invaded Iraq in 2003, one of the broader goals was to send a strong deterrent message to other dictators who might have weapons of mass destruction (even if Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein didn't).

Recent events in Syria show that President Bashar Assad didn't heed the warning. But Libya's Moammar Gadhafi did.

Read more
Live At The Village Vanguard
8:16 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Dave King Trio: Live At The Village Vanguard

Dave King.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:13 am

Perhaps you know Dave King as the drummer in The Bad Plus, or any number of avant-improv/indie-rock/Americana/electronic experimental bands rooted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. But somewhere in that mix is a deep fondness for the jazz tradition, and recently, he made it a point to say so with a full-length album. I've Been Ringing You investigates standards, mostly slow and medium-tempo ballads, in rough-hewn textures.

Read more
Book Reviews
7:23 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Suburban Islands Of Regret, More Than 'Nine Inches' Apart

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:36 am

Nine inches is the minimum distance required between middle school students during slow dances in the title story of Tom Perrotta's first book of short stories in 19 years. Nine miles — or make that nine light-years — is the distance between many of the narrators in these 10 stories, and the family and friends they've alienated with their stupid mistakes.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:20 am
Wed September 11, 2013

One Year After Benghazi Attack, 'Huge Gap' In Investigation

Sept. 11: The U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was aflame after coming under attack.
AFP/Getty Images

There are two sad anniversaries today. As we said earlier, the nation is pausing to mark the 12 years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Read more
Shots - Health News
6:52 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Fast Tests For Drug Resistance Bolster Malaria Fight

A Cambodian boy gets tested for malaria at a clinic along the Thai-Cambodian border in 2010. Three strains of drug-resistant malaria have emerged from this region over the past 50 years.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:15 am

Malaria researchers have developed what they consider a crucial advance: Simple and fast tests that can tell when parasites have become resistant to the front-line drug against malaria.

Taken together, these tests give humans a new tool to counter the malaria parasite's ability to outwit every drug that's ever been devised against it.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:45 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Nation Pauses To Mark Sept. 11 Attacks

A woman looks out at One World Trade Center from inside the 9/11 Empty Sky memorial at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J., on Wednesday. Americans commemorated the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks with solemn ceremonies and pledges to not forget the nearly 3,000 people killed.
Gary Hershorn Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:51 am

It was just after 8:45 a.m. ET on Sept. 11, 2001, when the first jet struck the World Trade Center in New York City and the worst terrorist attack in the nation's history began. Nearly 3,000 people died.

At that time this morning, many Americans paused for a moment of silence. President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama were among them.

Read more
This Is NPR
6:44 am
Wed September 11, 2013

You've Tracked Down Hundreds Of Accessible Playgrounds. Help Us Find More!

NPR designer Alyson Hurt's early sketch of the interface for editing accessible playgrounds.
Alyson Hurt NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 7:05 am

When NPR launched a national guide to accessible playgrounds two weeks ago, we knew it wasn't perfect.

It's not perfect because there isn't an official, comprehensive database of playgrounds with components designed for kids with special needs available to use as a source.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:15 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Book News: Richard Dawkins Under Fire For Child Abuse Remarks

Author and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins made a March 2012 visit to NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 8:57 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

First Watch: Polyphonic Spree, 'Raise Your Head'

A man calmly opens a bag of pretzels while another is mauled by a tiger in this scene from The Polyphonic Spree's "Raise Your Head" video.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:56 am

The inventor and engineer Rube Goldberg was known for designing elaborate machines that performed simple tasks, usually in a string of successive events, each one triggering the next. His work has been the inspiration for a lot of fantastic art and music videos (think of OK Go's "This Too Shall Pass," or A-Trak's "Tuna Melt").

Read more
It's All Politics
5:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Shift On Syria: A Show Of Strength Or Fear?

President Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office ahead of Tuesday night's speech on Syria.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:00 am

One line President Obama might have borrowed for his speech to the nation Tuesday night was a famous one from John F. Kennedy's inauguration address: "Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate."

Always admired as a fine turn of phrase, what meaning does this have in our own time?

Perhaps it might have helped Obama make the turn from indicting the Syrian regime's alleged use of chemical weapons to explaining why he backed off his own earlier threat of military retaliation against Syria.

Read more
Politics
5:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Fleshes Out Russian Plan For Syria's Chemical Weapons

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Obama last night urged a strike on Syria that he is not yet ready to order and that the country seems unready to accept.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:47 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Anthony Weiner's Run Ends With A Flourish Of His Finger

Anthony Weiner on Tuesday, before the results came in and before he waved goodbye.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:55 am

Voters in New York City are waiting to see whether Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio reached the 40 percent point that would avoid an Oct. 1 runoff with challenger William Thompson.

With about 98 percent of precincts having reported the results from Tuesday's voting, our colleagues at WNYC say that de Blasio has 40.19 percent of the vote to Thompson's 26.04 percent.

If de Blasio is declared the winner, he would face Republican Joe Lhota in November.

Read more
Europe
5:14 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Authorities Discover Vodka Vending Machine

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We've told you about baguettes in France offered in vending machines and bars of gold in Abu Dhabi. Now we can report on a vending machine selling vodka in Ukraine. For a dollar, patrons could enjoy a shot in the town center of Melitopol, mixers also available - until the machine was discovered by authorities. Unlawfully produced vodka is widespread in Ukraine and the vodka vending machine - a converted coffee maker. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

In These 'Gardens,' The Tree Rings Of The Radical Left

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 3:48 pm

Mohsin Hamid's latest novel is called How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

Jonathan Lethem's latest novel, Dissident Gardens, is expansive in scale. Chronologically speaking, it begins in the 1930s with Communist Party meetings in the U.S. It passes through the rise of McCarthyism, the establishment of the New York Mets, the hippie Age of Aquarius and the AIDS crisis. It ventures briefly abroad, to such places as behind-the-Iron-Curtain East Germany and war-torn Nicaragua. It ends in the Obama era of Occupy sit-ins and a rampant TSA.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Kerry's Meeting With Russian Is Next Key Moment In Syria Crisis

Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday as he testified before the House Armed Services Committee.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:00 am

Now that President Obama has made his case to the nation for holding Syrian President Bashar Assad responsible for a chemical weapons attack last month near Damascus, the next key moment in the quickly evolving crisis appears to be Thursday's meeting in Geneva between Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:43 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Cave Explorers Find Wallet Lost 17 Years Ago

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Seventeen years ago, Joseph Sweet and a friend went into a cave in Watertown, New York and got lost inside. They grew so desperate for light that Mr. Sweet made little torches out of the only fuel he had, taking dollar bills from his wallet and setting them on fire. On top of everything else, he lost the wallet. He was finally rescued. And now, 17 years later, different cave explorers found the wallet, still with ID, and returned it.

Author Interviews
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Hitting Terrorists Where It Hurts: Their Wallet

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Since Sept. 11, one of the most effective ways the United States has found to weaken terrorist groups has been to go after their finances. Renee Montagne talks to former Treasury official Juan Zarate, who's new book is: Treasury's War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare.

Business
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

World's Largest Ferris Wheel Will Be In Las Vegas

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Las Vegas is adding an eye-catching tourist attraction, in the form of a huge wheel that can take more than 1,000 people on a ride 550 feet into the sky over the city's famed Strip. The main construction of the wheel, called the High Roller, is nearly finished; it is expected to open in early 2014.

Business
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Price Of New iPhone May Be Too Expensive For China Market

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

In a sign of China's growing importance as a market for Apple, the company will be rolling out its new iPhones simultaneously in the U.S. and China for the first time later this month. There are a few signs, however, that the new models will not find the sort of frenzied demand as before.

Pages