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2:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Dominican Republican, Puerto Rico Face Off In World Baseball Championship

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. It is the first all Caribbean final. Tonight, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico are facing off in the World Baseball Classic in San Francisco. And for more on the big game and Major League Baseball's quest to make the sport more international, we're joined now by NPR's Tom Goldman, who is in San Francisco covering the event. Hi, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

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Middle East
2:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Syrian Rebels Describe Fight As Revolution For Justice, Not A Civil War

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The world must acknowledge that Syria is going through a revolution for justice and freedom, not a fight between two teams. That message today from the new interim prime minister of the opposition Syrian National Coalition. 50-year-old Ghassan Hitto will now attempt to form an interim government as violence continues across the country. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul.

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Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
2:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Gun Metaphors Deeply Embedded In English Language

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In January, when Vice President Biden concluded a week of meetings at the White House over how to curb gun violence, listen to the words he chose to describe the complexity.

VICE PRESIDENT JOSEPH BIDEN: We know that it is - there is no silver bullet.

BLOCK: And as for when he'd make his proposal?

BIDEN: I'm shooting for Tuesday. I hope I get it done by then.

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Around the Nation
2:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

U.S. Gets Low Marks On Infrastructure From Engineers' Group

The 63-year-old Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge in Washington, D.C., has been labeled structurally deficient — as is 1 in 9 bridges in America.
Rod Lamkey Jr. The Washington Times/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

The condition of the nation's roads, bridges and other kinds of infrastructure has actually improved over the past few years, but only slightly, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Four years ago, the group gave the nation's infrastructure a grade of D. Now, in their 2013 Report Card for America's Infrastructure, the engineers say it's up to a D-plus.

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Religion
2:58 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Moorish Science Spin-Off Group Bucks Federal And State Laws

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

An intriguing story now that we read about today in The Washington Post: 28-year-old Lamont Butler lived briefly this winter in a mansion in Bethesda, Maryland. The house with 12 bedrooms and 6 kitchens was up for sale. Butler didn't own it. He simply walked in and lived there. But Butler says he wasn't breaking and entering. He claims the mansion was his because he's a Moorish American national, a sovereign citizen not subject to federal and state laws. He says he goes by the free national name Lamont Maurice El.

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Around the Nation
2:46 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

With Headline Bus Tour, 'New York Post' Takes Manhattan

The New York Post is notorious for topping its stories of scandal and gossip with brazen and pun-laden headlines.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 10:06 am

One of the joys of living in New York City is laughing at the giant screaming headlines in the New York Post. When the former secretary of state knocked back a beer on one of her trips abroad: "Swillary." When the Lance Armstrong doping scandal broke: "Drug Pedaller." And when CIA director David Petraeus admitted having an affair? "Cloak And Shag Her."

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The Salt
2:46 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Cash Back on Broccoli: Health Insurers Nudge Shoppers To Be Well

A shopper at a branch of South African retailer Pick n Pay in Johannesburg. Health insurer Discovery offers rebates on health food at the chain to its members who enroll in a health promotion program.
SIPHIWE SIBEKO Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:49 pm

At $2.50 a pound, broccoli may seem too expensive. But cut the price by 25 percent, and our thinking about whether we should buy it may change.

A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine concludes that rebates on healthy food purchases lead to significant changes in what people put in their grocery carts.

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Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
2:44 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

What's Worked, And What Hasn't, In Gun-Loving Switzerland

Gun enthusiasts take part in a shooting competition at a club outside Zurich. The gun culture is deeply entrenched in Switzerland, where citizens as young as 10 learn to shoot.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 6:34 pm

Switzerland has an entrenched gun culture that is embraced by most of its 8 million citizens, some of them as young as 10 years old.

Every Swiss community has a shooting range, and depending on who is counting, the alpine country ranks third or fourth in the number of guns per capita.

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It's All Politics
2:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

How The Federal Budget Is Just Like Your Family Budget (Or Not)

Is your family budget really like the federal budget?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

The House has begun debate on its budget resolution, with a vote expected later this week. And as supporters talk about this budget, there's one comparison you hear a lot.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio: "Every family in America has to balance their budget. Washington should, too."

Rep. Scott Garrett, R-N.J.: "You know, every family in America understands the necessity of a balanced budget."

Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis.: "This is how every family tries to live in good times and in bad. Your government should do the same."

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Statue Of Liberty Will Reopen July 4th, Says Parks Service

A sea shell rests on a wall surrounding the Statue of Liberty, in New York in November. Tourists in New York will miss out for a while on one of the hallmarks of a visit to New York, seeing the Statue of Liberty up close. Though the statue itself survived Superstorm Sandy intact, the storm damaged buildings and Liberty Island's power and heating systems.
Richard Drew AP

The National Park Service is almost finished with extensive repairs at the Statue of Liberty site and they expect to reopen it to the public by July 4th.

The damage was caused by Hurricane Sandy. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said in a statement that the hurricane damaged docks, the energy infrastructure on Ellis Island and crippled the security screening system.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

WATCH: After 'Fascist' Accusations, Ukrainian Parliament Brawls

Ukrainian opposition and majority lawmakers fight around the rostrum during the session of parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, on Tuesday.
Sergei Chuzavkov AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:49 pm

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It's All Politics
1:59 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Assault Weapons Ban Is Gun Debate's First Casualty

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., has been told that her assault weapons ban will not be included in the Democratic gun bill to be introduced on the Senate floor in the coming weeks.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:48 pm

The prospects of an assault weapons ban emerging as part of any post-Newtown gun control law looks highly unlikely after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid opted not to include it in a Democratic proposal to be offered on the Senate floor in coming weeks.

"My understanding is it will not be [part of the base bill]" to be introduced on the Senate floor, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said after meeting with Reid on Monday, according to Politico. "The leader has decided not to do it."

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Middle East
1:44 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

'We Survived Iraq': An Iraqi Makes A New Home In North Carolina

Ali Hamdani was a doctor in Iraq before becoming a translator for NPR. He now lives in North Carolina.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Ten years after the Iraq War began, NPR is catching up with people we encountered during the conflict. Back in 2008, NPR's armored car was targeted with a so-called sticky bomb in Baghdad. Ali Hamdani, an Iraqi who worked for NPR as a translator and producer, narrowly escaped. Shortly afterward, he left Iraq for the Unites States as a refugee.

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Supreme Court OKs Discounted Resale Of 'Gray Market' Goods

People stand in line outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:51 pm

The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that U.S. companies that make and sell products abroad cannot prevent those items from being resold in the U.S.

The 6-3 decision — likely worth billions, even trillions of dollars — could have repercussions that extend from U.S. trade policy to local yard sales.

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Middle East
12:53 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Israelis, Palestinians Spar Over Controversial Settlement

A Jewish settler looks at the West Bank settlement of Maaleh Adumim from the E-1 area on the eastern outskirts of Jerusalem on Dec. 5. The Israelis are planning a controversial housing project in E-1.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:19 am

In practical terms, a project known as E-1 would provide 3,000 or so new housing units for Israelis in an area between east Jerusalem — which the Palestinians hope will someday be their capital — and the large Israeli settlement of Maaleh Adumim.

But numbers can be deceiving: Palestinians are renewing their objections to the growing number of Israeli settlements, and many fear E-1 could tip the balance in a way that makes an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement impossible.

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Author Interviews
12:11 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Veterans Face Red Tape Accessing Disability, Other Benefits

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 3:05 pm

Ten years ago, the United States invaded Iraq and began what the Bush administration said would be a short war.

But it wasn't until December 2011 that the United States officially ended its military mission there.

In addition to the tens of thousands of Iraqis who died, the war cost the lives of nearly 4,500 American service members, and wounded more than 32,200 men and women in America's military. Many of the wounded vets have faced — or are still facing — long waits for their disability and other benefits to begin.

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NPR Story
12:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

The Art Of Negotiating Intractable Conflicts

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:18 am

The tensions between Israelis and Palestinians are one of many long-standing conflicts often described as intractable. Conflict negotiation experts employ various strategies to tackle big problems, ranging from divorce and property management to ethnic, religious and international conflict.

Europe
12:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

The Ripple Effects Of Cyprus' Financial Crisis

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:42 pm

Cyprus lawmakers rejected a $13 billion bailout package that included controversial taxes on bank deposits. The proposed tax would have helped to pay for the bailout of crumbling banks. NPR's Marilyn Geewax explains how the events in Cyprus could affect the global economy and what may happen next.

Remembrances
12:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

A Ballet Memorial To A Son Killed At War

Dancer Josh Burnham plays the role of Colin Wolfe in the Manassas Ballet Theatre production Colin.
Melanie Beus Photography

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 11:32 am

Colin Wolfe was killed in Iraq in August 2006. A roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Anbar province just a few weeks after he arrived. He was one of almost 4,500 U.S. service members killed in Iraq between 2003 and 2012. Nearly seven years later, on the heels of the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, his mother paid tribute to her son with a ballet.

"You're taking something which is horrible ... and turning it into something which is beautiful and life-affirming," Amy Wolfe tells NPR's Lynn Neary. "That's the way art is."

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Malala, Pakistani Teen Shot For Demanding An Education, Heads To School In U.K.

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, attends her first day of school on Tuesday just weeks after being released from the hospital.
Malala Press Office AP

Some terrific news today: Malala Yousafzai's story has come full circle. If you remember, the Pakistani teenager was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman because she was in favor of girls receiving an education.

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Hey Punxsutawney Phil, What Happened To That Early Spring?

The sign says one thing. The snow pile says another. In Boston on Tuesday, a woman walked between a store sign heralding the start of spring and a snow pile still lingering from this winter's storms.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

"An early spring for you and me."

So said Punxsutawney Phil back on Groundhog Day (Feb. 2.) — which, if our math is right was, 6+ weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Flush With Oil, Abu Dhabi Opens World's Largest Solar Plant

Rows of parabolic mirrors at the Shams 1 plant in Abu Dhabi.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:34 pm

Abu Dhabi, the most oil-rich of the United Arab Emirates, is now home to the world's single-largest concentrated solar power plant.

The 100-megawatt Shams 1 plant cost an estimated $750 million and is expected to provide electricity to 20,000 homes, according to the BBC.

Why, you might ask?

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The Salt
11:20 am
Tue March 19, 2013

How Master Chefs Keep France's Brightest Culinary Flames Alive

Serge Devesa, executive chef at New York's InterContinental Barclay Hotel, prepares bouillabaisse, a specialty from his hometown of Marseille, France. Devesa was just named a master chef by the Maître Cuisiniers de France.
Courtesy of InterContinental Barclay

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:08 pm

On the television show MasterChef, amateur chefs compete for a title and go on to open their own restaurants, or ink TV deals. That's the Hollywood version of the master chef, anyway.

But to earn the title in France, chefs must be inducted into the prestigious — and very exclusive — society called Maître Cuisiniers de France. It's more than 60-years-old, and it's one of the highest honors in the country.

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Music Reviews
11:17 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Justin Timberlake Returns To Music With Enthusiasm And 'Experience'

The 20/20 Experience is Justin Timberlake's first album since 2006.
Tom Monro RCA

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 8:03 am

The orchestral swirls, the transition to a soul-man groove, the falsetto croon — there you have some of the key elements to Justin Timberlake's album The 20/20 Experience. The title implies a certain clarity of vision, even as any given song presents the singer as a starry-eyed romantic, bedazzled by a woman upon whom he cannot heap enough compliments, come-ons and seductive playfulness.

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U.S.
11:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

An 'Absolute Will To Forget': Iraq Casts Shorter Shadow Than Vietnam

A soldier in the last American military convoy to depart Iraq, from the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, waves after crossing over the border into Kuwait on Dec. 18, 2011.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:30 pm

Sometimes the whole country wants to forget.

Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq. The last U.S. troops didn't leave that country until the end of 2011.

But Iraq, which dominated much of the nation's political discourse over the past decade, already seems largely forgotten.

"The Iraq War casts a shadow, but not a very large one," says Richard Kohn, a military historian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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Shots - Health News
10:39 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Sorting Out The Mammogram Debate: Who Should Get Screened When?

A woman gets a mammogram in Putanges, France.
Mychele Daniau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:21 pm

Mammography outcomes from nearly a million U.S. women suggest which ones under 50 would stand the greatest chance of benefiting from regular screening: those with very dense breasts.

That's been a bone of contention ever since a federal task force declared nearly four years ago that women younger than 50 shouldn't routinely get the test.

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It's All Politics
10:38 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Rand Paul Reaffirms Support For Path To Citizenship

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks Tuesday to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:02 pm

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky doubled down Tuesday on a previous call for a path to citizenship, telling a major Hispanic business group that his message to the nation's illegal immigrants is: "If you wish to live and work in America, then we will find a place for you."

Conservatives, he told the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, must "become part of the solution" to immigration, including dealing with the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants now living in the U.S. In his Washington speech, Paul said:

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Tue March 19, 2013

House Across From Westboro Baptist Is Painted With Gay Pride Rainbow Colors

Planting Peace is painting the house across from the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka with the colors of the gay pride rainbow.
Courtesy of Carol Hartsell Huffington Post

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:41 pm

Aaron Jackson took inspiration from a 9-year-old kid who stood up to Westboro Baptist Church protesters.

As Mark wrote last year, Josef Miles stood in front of protesters carrying signs that read "God Hates [Gays]" with his own sign that read "God Hates No One."

Today, Jackson is following through on a project that started about six months ago when he decided to buy a house across the street from the infamous church in Topeka, Kan.

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Books
10:12 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Hemon's 'The Book Of My Lives': Finding Beauty In Sarajevo's Scars

Aleksandar Hemon is also the author of Nowhere Man.
Velibor Bozovic Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:47 pm

The war in Bosnia left Sarajevo ruined by siege scars. Aleksandar Hemon describes in his new memoir how "the streets were fractured by mortar-shell marks — lines radiating from a little crater at the point of impact." But he notes that those holes were later "filled out with red paint" and that "the people of Sarajevo now, incredibly, called [them] 'roses.' "

The same could be said about the essays that make up The Book of My Lives, Hemon's first book of nonfiction, a collection of thorned, blood-red roses that make beauty out of his broken past.

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Has The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Been Downgraded?

With President Clinton presiding, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed an interim peace accord at the White House in 1993. Twenty years later, President Obama is heading to the region with peace efforts in the deep freeze.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:18 am

Every American president since Harry Truman has wrestled with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, to no avail. Yet they keep trying based on the notion that the Middle East will never be calm until there's peace between these protagonists.

But as President Obama heads to Israel and the West Bank, expectations could hardly be lower. What's more, this long-standing feud, often seen as the holy grail of American diplomacy, no longer seems to hold the same urgency, according to many analysts.

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