NPR News

Pages

Song Travels
2:13 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Catherine Russell On 'Song Travels'

Catherine Russell.
Stefan Falke Courtesy of the artist.

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 2:18 pm

As a child, singer Catherine Russell bounced on the knee of Louis Armstrong. Her father, Luis Russell, held the position of musical director for Armstrong, and her mother, Carline Ray, was trained at Juilliard and the Manhattan School of Music. It was only natural that Russell would choose a musical path for her own life.

Read more
Asia
1:36 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

From Police Chief To Political Office, Jobs Are For Sale In China

The 12th National People's Congress holds the election for its new president at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:15 pm

China's new president, Xi Jinping, who was formally elected Thursday, is already engaged in his own anti-corruption campaign, threatening to go after the key players — the tigers as well as the flies.

Confronting the issue is a matter of political self-interest and survival for China's new leaders. The problem is how to root out corrupt officials when so many are quite literally invested in the system.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Record $614 Million In Penalties Levied As Insider Trading Cases Are Settled

Connecticut-based hedge fund CR Intrinsic Investors "has agreed to pay more than $600 million to settle SEC charges that it participated in an insider trading scheme involving a clinical trial for an Alzheimer's drug," the Securities and Exchange Commission announced Friday.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Runway Scare: Driverless Van Crosses Path Of Passenger Jet At Toronto Airport

A van that had been left running and in gear crossed an active runway at Toronto's Pearson International Airport, seen here in a 2012 photo. The incident, which occurred late Monday, is under investigation.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Canadian officials are investigating an incident in which a driverless van traveled across the runway at Toronto's Pearson International Airport, at the same time an Air Canada flight was landing late Monday night. After the plane's pilots reportedly ignored commands to pull up, the jet "narrowly missed" the van, investigators say.

From the CBC:

Read more
The Two-Way
12:57 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

With General Assembly Approval, Maryland Poised To Repeal Death Penalty

With a vote today in the House of Delegates, Maryland's General Assembly has approved a bill that abolishes the death penalty in the state.

If signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley, which is expected, Maryland will become the 18th state to end capital punishment.

The Baltimore Sun reports:

"The 82-56 vote came after an impassioned debate. The legislation cleared the state Senate last week 27-20.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

In Response To North Korea And Iran, U.S. Will Beef Up Missile Defenses

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:19 pm

Update at 3:09 p.m. ET. 14 Additional Interceptors:

The United States will deploy 14 additional ground-based missile interceptors (GBIs) to combat the nuclear attack threats from North Korea and Iran, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said today during a press briefing.

"The United States stands firm against aggression," Hagel said.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

VIDEO: See Comet Pan-STARRS Dragging Its Tail Through Space

Comet PanSTARRS, as viewed by NASA's orbiting STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory).
NASA

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:03 pm

Comet Pan-STARRS is putting on a bit of a show for those in the Northern Hemisphere through the end of this month. We're seeing some beautiful photos, such as those taken this week by AFP/Getty's Stan Honda. He pointed his camera skyward near Magdalena, N.M.

The best viewing came earlier this week, but Forbes writes that if you're in the Northern Hemisphere you're not too late to see Pan-STARRS. It offers some tips:

Read more
All Songs Considered
12:11 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

SXSW 2013: Day Three In Photos

Ecstatic Cafe Tacvba fans at Alt.Latino's SXSW showcase at Auditorium Shores.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:02 pm

¡Viva! Alt.Latino presented a killer showcase from Auditorium Shores with Cafe Tacvba and Bajofondo on Thursday.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:31 am
Fri March 15, 2013

To Mark 10th Anniversary Of Iraq Invasion, Researchers Assess The Cost

Members of the US Army's Old Guard carry team lift the remains of U.S. Army Specialist Israel Candelaria Mejias from San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, as his body is returned on a C-17 to the U.S. from Iraq on April 7, 2009.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Nearly ten years since the United States invaded Iraq, researchers at Brown University are assessing the cost of the war.

The report, from Brown's Watson Institute for International Studies, is comprehensive, taking a look at the direct and indirect costs of war, but from the university's press release, here is bottom line:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri March 15, 2013

A Peek Into Exoplanet's Atmosphere Offers Clues To How It Was Formed

The 10-meter Keck II (right), a twin of the world's largest optical telescope, was used to study the atmosphere of HR 8799c.
Richard Wainscoat AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:06 pm

Scientists peering into the atmosphere of a giant planet 130 light years away believe their findings bolster one theory of how solar systems form.

The planet, orbiting the star HR 8799, is part of a solar system containing at least three other "super-Jupiters" weighing in at between five and 10 times the mass of our own Jupiter. The nearby system features a brash, young 30-million-year-old star (by contrast, our Sun is in midlife at about 4.5 billion years old).

Read more
It's All Politics
11:03 am
Fri March 15, 2013

The Bush Family Checklist

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks to the media after being named chairman of the National Constitution Center's Board of Trustees Dec. 6 in Philadelphia.
William Thomas Cain Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 3:58 am

And the Bushes just keep on coming.

In recent memory, there was George H.W. Bush, 41st president of the United States. Then there was George W. Bush, 43rd president. And now there's John Ellis "Jeb" Bush, who may want to become the 45th president.

Jeb is sending mixed signals: Tonight he is a keynote speaker at a Conservative Political Action Conference dinner, but he has asked that his name be removed from CPAC's 2016 presidential straw poll.

Does Jeb have what it takes to be the next president of the United States?

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:57 am
Fri March 15, 2013

More Patients Keep HIV At Bay Without Antiviral Drugs

An electron micrograph of HIV particles infecting a human T cell. French researchers say they've found 14 patients with so little HIV virus in their blood that the patients have gone into "long-term remission."
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 7:00 am

Just last week AIDS researchers were excited about a Mississippi toddler whose blood has remained free of HIV many months after she stopped getting antiviral drugs – what doctors call a "functional cure."

Read more
It's All Politics
10:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Four Faces Of Conservatism: Possible Directions For The GOP

iStockphoto

Is it the message or its delivery?

That's one of the questions being debated as Republicans — like all parties that have lost a national election — plot their comeback.

Some think they need to take a new tack on issues such as immigration in order to appeal to changing times and demographic changes. Others believe that the GOP's core conservative principles are still political winners, if delivered in a more convincing manner than was the case during last year's presidential race.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:43 am
Fri March 15, 2013

NHL Realignment: New Divisions Drawn To Ease Time Zone Conflicts

A chart depicts the NHL's new divisions, which will take effect when the new season begins later this year. The lineup puts 16 teams in the Eastern Conference, and 14 in the Western.
NHL

The NHL will shuffle its teams before next season, moving from three divisions in each conference to a total of four divisions in the Eastern and Western Conferences. The league's owners approved the plan Thursday; the players' association gave its OK last week.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:27 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Court Says CIA Can't Have It Both Ways On Drones

Don't deny you have documents about drones, court tells the CIA.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:56 pm

A federal appeals court has rejected an effort by the CIA to deny it has any documents about a U.S. drone program that has killed terrorists overseas, ruling that the agency is stretching the law too far and asking judges "to give their imprimatur to a fiction of deniability that no reasonable person would regard as plausible."

Read more
The Two-Way
10:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Man Who Set Fire To Navy Submarine Sentenced To 17 Years

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) enters a dry dock to begin an engineered overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.
Jim Cleveland U.S. Navy

Casey Fury, the civilian employee who set fire to the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine in Maine was sentenced to 17 years in prison, today.

Fury pleaded guilty to two counts of arson, one for the Miami fire, the other for a fire he set weeks later.

Sea Coast Online reports:

"'From the bottom of my heart, I'm truly sorry,' Fury said during his sentencing hearing. 'I can't put into words the remorse I feel. I had no intention of hurting anyone.'"

Read more
Politics
9:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CPAC Goes To Washington: Can They Rally And Rebuild?

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 7:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, you might've been following the long debate over whether this country locks up too many people for too little reason and for too long. It turns out something else interesting is happening that you might not heard about - the racial breakdown of the prison population is changing. More white people, especially more white women, are getting locked up. And we'll find out more about that in a few minutes.

Read more
Law
9:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do You Really Know Who's Behind Bars?

There's been a dramatic shift in the racial makeup of America's prison inmates, especially female inmates. To find out why, host Michel Martin talks with Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer, and author Patrice Gaines, who has worked with women in prison for more than 20 years. They say changes in drug crime enforcement, sentencing laws, and the economic downturn all played a role.

Movie Reviews
9:43 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Three New Films Examine What It Means When Girls Act Out

Ginger & Rosa (starring Alice Englert and Elle Fanning) was directed by Sally Potter, who is perhaps best known for her 1992 film Orlando.
Sally Potter

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:37 pm

In the '60s, some fervent rock groupies formed a band called the GTOs — short for "Girls Together Outrageously" — and while it didn't last, the name captures the impulse behind stories in which women chafe against the male-centric society that pulls their strings. This week you can see a girls-together-outrageously triple bill: Spring Breakers, Ginger & Rosa and Beyond the Hills.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

Read more
The Two-Way
9:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:33 am

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

Read more
Ask Me Another
8:55 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Accidental Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Now, let's welcome back to the ASK ME ANOTHER hot seat, our VIP Jad Abumrad.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jad, were you sweating it out backstage?

JAD ABUMRAD: Some of this stuff is abusively hard.

EISENBERG: Abusively hard. I don't think it's not...

ABUMRAD: No, no, it's fine. It's all good quizzical fun.

EISENBERG: Good quizzical fun.

ABUMRAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: You're ready.

ABUMRAD: I'm ready.

Read more
Movie Interviews
8:35 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Paul Thomas Anderson, The Man Behind 'The Master'

most twisted father-son tales ever told."" href="/post/paul-thomas-anderson-man-behind-master-0" class="noexit lightbox">
Navy veteran Freddie (Phoenix) falls under the influence of cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) in Anderson's film, which critic Ella Taylor describes as "one of the most twisted father-son tales ever told."
Phil Bray The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 9:52 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 2, 2012.

For Paul Thomas Anderson, moviemaking is not just an art; it's also about time management.

"At its best, a film set is when everybody knows what's going on and everybody's working together," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "At its worst, [it's] when something's been lost in communication and an actor's not sure how many shots are left or what's going on, and the makeup department's confused."

Read more
NPR Story
8:31 am
Fri March 15, 2013

He Blinded Me With Science

Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab." href="/post/he-blinded-me-science" class="noexit lightbox">
"I feel sort of like a vampire would feel. I want to suck the blood of science and dispose of the corpse." - Jad Abumrad, this week's V.I.P. (that's Very Important Puzzler) and host of the public radio show Radiolab.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:12 am

Science takes center stage this week as we play games about scientific discoveries both intentional and accidental. We'll get brainy with our Very Important Puzzler, Jad Abumrad, host of WNYC's Radiolab, as he talks about his quest to become a science vampire. Plus, we roll the dice on clues about our favorite board games and find out the premises of fake TV show adaptations, from Finding Emo to Oy! Story.

All Songs Considered
8:28 am
Fri March 15, 2013

SXSW 2013: Day Three Highlights

The Flaming Lips on stage at the Belmont in Austin, Texas. The band played its 2002 album, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots.
Jordan Naylor Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 11:30 am

  • Hear The SXSW Day 3 Late Night Dispatch

The span of South by Southwest is so huge that sometimes the festival can be about the bands you miss as much as the ones you see. After the hectic Thursday on the streets, bars and venues of Austin, Texas, the All Songs Considered crew regrouped to recount the long walks, long lines, tough decisions, missed opportunities and happy accidents of day three.

Read more
'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
8:22 am
Fri March 15, 2013

It's All Politics, Mar. 14, 2013

Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

The white smoke has appeared and that can mean only one thing: the new edition of the It's All Politics podcast with NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving is ready. It also means that there's no budget deal in Congress, that the annual Conservative Political Action Conference is underway and that Carl Levin has decided that 36 years in the Senate is enough.

Shots - Health News
8:14 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Power Shift Under Way As Middle Class Expands In Developing World

Brookings Institution

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 7:00 am

"The meek shall inherit the earth" — that seems to be the latest message from the United Nations Development Program.

Their 2013 Human Development Report chronicles the recent, rapid expansion of the middle class in the developing world. It also predicts that over the next two decades growth in the so-called "Global South" will dramatically shift economic and political power away from Europe and North America.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
8:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is The Human Hand Our Best Technology?

"Only the hand can tell where it's tender, where the patient winces." — Abraham Verghese
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:58 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Abraham Verghese's TEDTalk

Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are data points, and calls for a return to the traditional physical exam.

About Abraham Verghese

Read more
The Two-Way
8:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

New Pope Praises Benedict, Asks Cardinals To Evangelize

Pope Francis as he visits the papal residence at the Vatican on Thursday.
Vatican AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:43 am

Pope Francis, in his first audience with the cardinals since becoming head of the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics, praised his predecessor, Benedict XVI, and urged the evangelization of the church's message.

Francis said of Benedict, who served as pontiff for eight years before his historic resignation last month, that he "lit a flame in the depths of our hearts that will continue to burn because it is fueled by his prayers."

Read more
TED Radio Hour
8:01 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Are Droids Taking Our Jobs?

Andrew McAfee speaking at TEDxBoston.
Sheryl Lanzel TED

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:57 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Andrew McAfee's TEDTalk

Robots and algorithms can now build cars, write articles, and translate texts — all work that once required a human. So what will we humans do for work? Andrew McAfee looks at recent labor data to say: We ain't seen nothing yet.

About Andrew McAfee

Read more

Pages