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Africa
8:38 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Nelson Mandela Said To Be Gravely Ill

South Africa is on watch for the fate of the 94-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate. The ailing Mandela, an international icon known for his fight to end apartheid, has been in the hospital for several days. For the latest on his condition, Renee Montagne speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

Parallels
8:23 am
Thu June 27, 2013

The Day Nelson Mandela Walked Out Of Prison

Nelson Mandela, with his wife, Winnie, walks to freedom after 27 years in prison on Feb. 11, 1990, in Cape Town.
AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 5:19 pm

One of the most remarkable days of Nelson Mandela's extraordinary life was Feb. 11, 1990, when he walked out of prison after 27 years behind bars. Greg Myre, the international editor of NPR.org, covered Mandela's release for The Associated Press and recounts that day.

The evening before his release from 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was ushered into a secret meeting with South African President F.W. de Klerk for a conversation that sounded straight from the theater of the absurd.

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Obama: NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Has More Documents

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:12 am

During a news briefing in Senegal, President Obama said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in possession of more classified documents and that the government did not know "what other documents he may try to dribble out there."

That said, the president added that he will not "be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker."

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Shots - Health News
7:24 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Test-Driving The Obamacare Software

Hit return for health coverage.
iStockphoto.com

All the outreach in the world won't count for much if the Obamacare ticket counter doesn't work.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Book News: Arthur C. Clarke's DNA Headed For A New Space Odyssey

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Top Stories: Mandela Still Critical; Obama Visits Senegal

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:35 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Mandela's Daughter: 'It Doesn't Look Good.'

-- President Obama Begins Weeklong Africa Trip.

And here are more early headlines:

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The Two-Way
5:15 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Mandela's Daughter: 'It Doesn't Look Good'

A man holds a picture as people gather to leave messages of support for former South African President Nelson Mandela outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:59 am

Nelson Mandela's condition is "very critical," his daughter Makaziwe Mandela told South African broadcaster SABC.

"I reiterate that Tata is very critical, that anything is imminent," said Makaziwe. "But I want to emphasize again that it's only God who knows when the time to go is. So we will wait with Tata. He's still giving us hope by opening his eyes, he's still reactive to touch, we will live with that hope until the final end comes."

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Globetrotting Cartoonist Heads Home In 'User's Guide'

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:25 am

It looks like a last-minute gift, like one of those tiny tomes that live near the register on the counter of your favorite bookstore, hoping to catch the attention (or at least the impulse) of shoppers in the check-out line. Given its digest-sized dimensions and jokey title, you'd be forgiven for assuming A User's Guide to Neglectful Parenting is a hastily assembled collection of cornball homilies, like those miniature books about dads, grads and golf that double as greeting cards this time of year. But don't be fooled.

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The Two-Way
4:37 am
Thu June 27, 2013

President Obama Begins Weeklong Africa Trip

President Obama reviews an honor guard on Wednesday outside the presidential palace in Dakar, Senegal.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:41 am

Arriving in Senegal on Wednesday night, President Obama kicked off a weeklong trip to Africa. NPR's Ari Shapiro, who is traveling with the president, tells our Newscast desk that Obama will emphasize democracy and security during his visit.

Ari filed this report from Dakar:

"The streets here in Dakar are full of posters proclaiming, 'Welcome Obama.'

"They show the U.S. president next to Senegal's recently elected president, Macky Sall. The posters almost make it look like the two are running mates in a campaign.

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Parallels
4:29 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Same-Sex Marriage, Around The World

In Montpellier, France, Vincent Autin (center) and Bruno Boileau, with Mayor Helene Mandroux, are married in a civil ceremony on May 29. They were the first same-sex couple to marry in France after the government voted to legalize gay marriage.
Claude Paris AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 8:52 am

Same-sex couples rejoiced in the United States on Wednesday, as the U.S. Supreme Court in a 5-4 ruling struck down as unconstitutional a federal law denying benefits to same-sex couples.

That got us wondering: Where else in the world can same-sex couples get married legally?

Here's a list of countries and the year each legalized gay marriage.

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Around the Nation
3:46 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Expecting Parents Ask For Help Naming Their Son

A Connecticut couple couldn't decide whether to name their soon-to-be-born son Jackson or Logan. So according to the New Haven Register, they decided to take a poll of customers at Starbucks. In the end, they went with their own suggestion: Logan Jackson.

World
3:41 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Racing Pigeon Has Poor Sense Of Direction

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A pigeon that set out on what was to be a 600-mile race in Japan lost his way, and ended up landing 5,000 miles across the Pacific in Canada. When it was found on Vancouver Island, the bird was exhausted and very skinny. Now he's been adopted by a pigeon racing club there. They're considering breeding the bird, figuring his offspring will be just as resilient, though hopefully the young ones will get their sense of direction from the mother.

Middle East
2:27 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Israeli Political Leaders Disagree On 2-State Peace Solution

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:12 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Secretary of State John Kerry goes to Jerusalem today to meet with Israel's prime minister, an effort to restart Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Kerry's effort wasn't helped, though, when yesterday Israel announced permits for dozens of new homes in east Jerusalem, an area that's central to Palestinian hopes for its own state.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says he supports the idea of a Palestinian state alongside Israel. Still, as NPR's Emily Harris in Jerusalem tells us, some of Netanyahu's own government are not on board.

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Law
2:21 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Gay Military Spouses To Benefit From Supreme Court Ruling

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The Supreme Court ruling yesterday on the Defense of Marriage Act will change the lives of many people, including some in the U.S. military. Gay spouses of service members have long been denied the substantial benefits available to heterosexual couples. Yesterday's ruling that struck down DOMA means gay married couples can look forward to more equal treatment from the Pentagon, as NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

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Fine Art
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

A Paris Vacation For Nashville Millionaires' French Art

A table (Le Dejeuner), an 1892 oil painting by Edouard Vuillard, appears to show a quiet domestic scene. But Isabelle Cahn, the curator of a new show at the Musee d'Orsay, says this painting actually depicts a scandal-ridden household.
Courtesy Musee d'Orsay

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:05 am

To say that Nashvillean Spencer Hays is crazy for French art is an understatement. "French art just quickens our step, fires our spirit and touches our heart," he says.

Hays' passion began when he was in his 30s. By then he was already a millionaire; Forbes estimated his worth at $400 million in 1997, money earned from book-selling and clothing businesses. Hays had humble beginnings.

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Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Agriculture's Waning Influence In Washington Hinders Farmers

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

$99 Game Console Ouya Aims To Take Down Barriers To Fans

The Ouya game console and controller. Games are sold through something like an app store, allowing customers to sample them before buying.
Courtesy of Ouya

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:37 am

Sony and Microsoft are preparing to launch their latest gaming consoles this fall with price tags from $400 for the PlayStation 4 and $500 for the Xbox One. But this week, a $99 game console went on sale and sold out at Target and Amazon.

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Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Racial Slur Puts Paula Deen's Empire At Risk

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:15 am

The world's largest retailer Wal-Mart is joining the list of companies severing ties with southern food star Paula Deen. The Savannah, Georgia-based cook and restaurateur has been on the front burner since an admission she used a racial slur in the past.

Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:49 am

New York City became the most populous place in the United States to require businesses to give employees paid sick leave. Mayor Michael Bloomberg had previously vetoed this requirement, but has now been overruled by the City Council.

Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Delta Airlines Fined For The Way It Bumps Passengers

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Bumped.

Yesterday, we told you about Delta Airlines CEO Richard Anderson. He gave up his seat on a flight to a woman desperately trying to get to Atlanta to pick up her daughter.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Walgreens Cashes In On Department Stores' Pain

Customers check out at the new flagship Walgreens in Washington, D.C.'s Chinatown.
Brenda Salinas NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 11:21 am

At the turn of the 20th century, drugstores were little more than a pharmacist and a soda fountain. If you wanted to go shopping, you went to a department store.

Now, that trend is reversing. Department stores are suffering and drugstores are booming.

So much so that Walgreens — one of the industry's leaders — is experimenting with expanding its goods and services.

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The Salt
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Coffee Futures: The Highs And Lows Of A Cup Of Joe

Want to invest in coffee futures? One roaster says when it comes to the price of coffee, it "is like a roller coaster."
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:49 am

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color.
Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 7:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

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Environment
2:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

This Climate Fix Might Be Decades Ahead Of Its Time

Global Thermostat's pilot plant in Menlo Park, Calif., pulls carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. The next challenge is to find uses for the captured gas.
Courtesy of Global Thermostat

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 1:35 pm

Every year, people add 30 billion tons of carbon dioxide to the air, mostly by burning fossil fuels. That's contributing to climate change. A few scientists have been dreaming about ways to pull some of that CO2 out of the air, but face stiff skepticism and major hurdles. This is the story of one scientist who's pressing ahead.

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The Two-Way
10:03 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

As People Head Into Space, PayPal Says It Will Follow Them

No Free Doughnuts, Even In Space: PayPal is announcing a project with SETI, aiming to solve issues around taking regular people — and commerce — into space. Here, an artist's rendering of a space hotel, from the Space Tourism Society.
John Spencer Space Tourism Society

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:48 am

Many people know how to buy things in cyberspace. But what about doing business in outer space? That's the question PayPal says it wants to answer. Citing the looming era of space tourism, the company is creating the PayPal Galactic project along with the SETI Institute, "to help make universal space payments a reality."

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Monkey See
6:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Telemundo's 'La Voz' Hands Latino Kids The Mic

Paola Guanche debuted with Adele's "Turning Tables."
Courtesy Telemundo

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:34 am

NBC's singing competition The Voice dominated the ratings game this spring and last fall. Now, the Spanish kids' version has become the top-rated show for NBC's sister network, Telemundo. The show, taped before an audience in Miami, features Latino children from the U.S. competing for a scholarship and a recording contract.

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Parallels
6:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Amid Construction Boom, Migrants Flow Into Brazil

Construction is underway on the Itaquerao stadium in Sao Paulo, shown here June 12. The stadium will be the venue for the opening ceremony and game of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, and many migrants are among the laborers working on the project.
Sebastiao Moreira EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:34 am

Brazil is in the midst of a building boom as it constructs stadiums across the country in preparation for the World Cup it will host next year. In Sao Paulo, hundreds of workers are building a massive arena that will take many more months to complete.

But not all of the workers are Brazilian.

Marie Eveline Melous, 26, arrived from Haiti just a few months ago because life was so difficult, especially after the huge earthquake in 2010. "It's hard to find work. I came to Brazil to help my situation," she says.

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Science
6:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

New Bugs In Florida Stymie Researchers, Threaten Crops

The psyllid, discovered eight years ago in Florida citrus groves, has been problematic for researchers and farmers alike.
University of California, Davis AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:34 am

With its pleasant climate, Florida has become home to more exotic and invasive species of plants and animals than any other state in the continental U.S. Some invasive species have been brought in deliberately, such as the Burmese python or the Cuban brown snail. But the majority of species are imported inadvertently as cargo.

Amanda Hodges, who heads the biosecurity research lab at the University of Florida, says that until recently, scientists saw about a dozen new bugs arrive in Florida each year.

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Humans
3:12 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Pitch-Perfect: Why Our Shoulders Are Key To Throwing

Harry Kaplan practices pitching during Home Run Baseball Camp at Friendship Recreation Center in June. Kaplan's arm is stretched long and toward the ground as his hips are faced away from the catcher. A chimp, in contrast, could never throw a fastball.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 3:01 pm

The ability to throw a baseball or any object with speed and precision is unique to us humans. And that ability depends on certain features of our anatomy that arose in our ancestors over 2 million years ago, according to a study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.

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Health
2:50 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

'The Lyme Wars' That Tiny Ticks Have Wrought

In the current New Yorker, Michael Specter explores the conflict among some people who suffer from Lyme disease, and the doctors who study it.
aanton iStockphoto.com

Until 1977, Lyme disease was almost unknown. But in the decades since a Yale rheumatologist first described an unusual cluster of arthritis cases in Lyme, Conn., the disease has become the most commonly reported tick-borne illness in the country. Acute symptoms of Lyme disease commonly include a bull's-eye rash followed by flu-like symptoms.

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