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Africa
2:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Thousands Of Protesters Stage Opposing Rallies In Cairo

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Friday saw a very tense situation in Cairo. Anti-Morsi crowds filled Tahrir Square and pro-Morsi crowds gathered on the Sixth of October bridge. There were skirmishes between the two groups but no major clashes. There was also almost no police presence in the area, except in helicopters flying above the fray. There were also confrontations in Alexandria.

Food
2:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Americans' Dining Technique Was Long-Abandoned By French

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, a story about table etiquette from our friends at Slate.com. They ask this question. Do you cut and switch? Meaning, do you hold your fork in your left hand and cut with your right and then put down your knife so you can switch your fork to your right hand before you take a bite? Contributing writer Mark Vanhoenacker writes that while the practice has origins in France, they and other Europeans long ago abandoned it.

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Middle East
2:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Energy Crisis Cripples Pakistan's Economy

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Most people will agree that the world wants Pakistan, a nuclear-armed nation, to be stable. That's not easy in a country where the Taliban and other militants are killing and maiming people every day. But ask Pakistanis what the country's biggest problem is today and they'll likely cite a different issue. Many will tell you it is Pakistan's severe energy crisis.

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Media
2:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Recordings Capture Murdoch's Anger At 'Sun' Investigations

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Newly released audio tapes capture News Corp. chairman Rupert Murdoch expressing contempt at the investigation that has embroiled his top-selling newspaper in corruption charges in the U.K. Murdoch was recorded saying he probably panicked by cooperating so fully with Scotland Yard — and told reporters at the Sun that paying cops for information has been a practice in the British press for more than a century.

Sports
2:25 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Pittsburgh Pirates Surprise Baseball Fans With Winning Season

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Jonah Keri, baseball columnist for the website Grantland, about the Pittsburg Pirates' amazing season.

Shots - Health News
1:46 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Genes May Reveal When Aspirin Won't Reduce Heart Risk

Aspirin has been prescribed for decades as a simple way to reduce heart disease risk, but doctors still aren't sure how it works.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:18 am

People are often told to take low-dose aspirin to reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke. But that preventive remedy doesn't work for a lot of people.

Researchers say they've found genetic variations that might be used to identify people who don't respond well to aspirin. If the results prove out, there could soon be a blood test to tell who benefits from aspirin, and who needs to look for other treatments to reduce cardiovascular risk.

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

40 Years Of Disco Duds Prove A Teacher Can Be Awesome, Too

Dale Irby in 1973 (left) when his streak began, and in 2012, when the last of his 40 wonderful school photos was taken.
Courtesy of Dale Irby and The Dallas Morning News

One word came to mind this week when we saw the stories about Texas physical education teacher Dale Irby and how he had worn the same "groovy shirt and sweater vest" for every school photo in the past 40 years:

Awesome.

Before we explore his awesomeness, though, here's some background.

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The Picture Show
1:24 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Oooh! Aaah! Faces In The Fireworks

Emanuyani Yamni (left) and her sister Kaiar, both of Rochester, N.Y., enjoy the fireworks display over the reflecting pool from the Lincoln Memorial on the Fourth of July.
Heather Rousseau NPR

We assigned our trusty interns to document the feeling of watching fireworks on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. They focused on the crowd's reactions while basking in the warm glow of the display. The images capture the gasps and sheer amazement from spectators of all ages.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Planet Money
1:05 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

How To Spend $442 On A 15-Minute Cab Ride

Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:37 am

Say you're in Midtown Manhattan at rush hour. You need to go a mile uptown, and you can't find a cab. A pedicab, a taxi-bicycle hybrid (like the one in the picture) may not be a bad option.

Riding through the middle of Manhattan on the back of a bike, dodging buses and cabs, feels like the Wild West of transportation options. The pricing feels that way too: Unlike buses or cabs, pedicabs don't charge a set fee. It's whatever the rider and the driver agree to. And, like in the Wild West, innocents often get fleeced.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
12:36 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

NIH Director Francis Collins Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat July 6, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Francis Collins is a pretty good scientist. He unraveled the human genome, among other parlor tricks and now he's the head of the National Institutes of Health. We started our visit with him by asking him what the heck that is.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
12:36 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Smithsonian's Wayne Clough Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat July 6, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
12:36 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Astrophysicist Adam Riess Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat July 6, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Winning a Nobel Prize, that's not cool. You know what's cool? Winning a MacArthur Grant and then winning a Nobel Prize.

CARL KASELL: Astrophysicist Adam Reiss did just that, winning the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. And he joined us that very week, along with P.J. O'Rourke, Paula Poundstone and Luke Burbank.

SAGAL: I started by asking him if he could explain what his award was for.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Djokovic And Murray Win, Advance To Wimbledon Final

Serbia's Novak Djokovic (left) embraces Argentina's Juan Martin Del Potro after their match on day 11 of the 2013 Championships at Wimbledon.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:32 pm

Novak Djokovic, the top seed in the Wimbledon men's draw, advanced to Sunday's singles final in a record-setting 4 hours, 43 minutes. The longest semifinal in tournament history, his five-set match fell only five minutes shy of the time set in a marathon 2008 five-set final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

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NPR Story
12:24 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Ron Carter On Piano Jazz

Ron Carter first appeared on the national scene as a member of Miles Davis' second great quintet, which coalesced around the recording of Davis' album Seven Steps to Heaven.

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The Two-Way
11:39 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Florida Family, Historic Yacht Presumed Lost Off New Zealand

This undated photo provided by the St. Andrews Historic Seaport and Commercial Marina in Panama City, Fla., shows American David Dyche, skipper of the 70-foot (21-meter) vessel Nina.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:55 am

The search for six Americans and one British man lost in the seas between New Zealand and Australia was called off Friday after extensive aerial searches failed to turn up any sign of the 85-year-old wooden sailing boat they were traveling on.

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Science
11:35 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Benjamin Franklin's Intellectual Revolution

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Up next, you know, this week was Independence Day, and to celebrate, we're going to be looking at the life of Benjamin Franklin. We know him for his role in the American Revolution, but we're going to look at the great intellectual revolution he brought to America. Maybe you didn't know about that. Well, you can find out more about it in the new book, "The Society for Useful Knowledge: How Benjamin Franklin and Friends Brought the Enlightenment to America."

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Environment
11:35 am
Fri July 5, 2013

With Rising Temperatures, Infrastructure Falters

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Exactly a year ago this week, a video on YouTube went viral. It was called "Heat Buckles Highway, SUV Goes Airborne." A road in Wisconsin buckled so badly from the heat that it sent cars flying. Well, this year, the buckling continues. But if you're in certain parts of the country, you don't need me to tell you that. It's hot, and I'm not going to use that but-it's-a-dry-heat line, either.

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Song Travels
10:43 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Mark O'Connor On 'Song Travels'

Mark O'Connor.
Jim McGuire Courtesy of the artist

Violinist Mark O'Connor is one of the most versatile fiddlers in music today: He seems equally at home playing bluegrass, country, jazz and classical. With its roots in Texas fiddling, O'Connor's music has shaped an entirely American school of string playing. His approach to teaching violin is considered a rival to the Suzuki method.

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Business
10:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

June Jobs Report Exceeds Expectations, But Concerns Remain

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the jobs report.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Middle East
10:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Shootings Reported At Demonstrations In Egypt

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

This is a week when Egypt is divided on what democracy means. In what amounted to a second uprising, millions of Egyptians poured into the streets to demand that their democratically elected president step down. When he balked, the army ousted Mohamed Morsi, which led his supporters to say it is a dark day for democracy there. Today, thousands of Morsi supporters are out protesting that military coup, in demonstrations that have reportedly turned violent.

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U.S.
10:21 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Understanding Migrants Through The Things They Carried

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, preachers serve as spiritual guides for their flocks, but what happens when a preacher loses his own faith? We'll talk with one man who knows what that's like in just a few minutes. But first, anthropologists and archaeologists, of course, study the way that groups live throughout history.

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Religion
10:21 am
Fri July 5, 2013

From Deep In The Bible Belt, Pastor Looks For 'Hope After Faith'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's the segment on this program when we talk about issues of religion and spirituality in our lives. And today, we focus on the absence of faith.

(SOUNDBITE OF JERRY DEWITT SPEECH)

JERRY DEWITT: I realized I was standing on a rock. Yes, my friends, there was a rock and it was a rock of reason. I want you to understand that today you're changing the future. You're making life better. And there is hope after faith. Can I get a Darwin?

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Economy
10:21 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Four Years On, Economic Recovery Still Sluggish

June job numbers are out, and the unemployment rate is still 7.6%. As the U.S. enters its fifth year of recovery, guest host Celeste Headlee asks Sudeep Reddy of the Wall Street Journal where we go from here.

The Salt
9:16 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

An ancient wild barley sample recovered from Chogha Golan, Iran.
Courtesy of TISARP/Science

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 9:46 am

Archaeologists digging in the foothills of Iran's Zagros Mountains have discovered the remains of a Stone Age farming community. It turns out that people living there were growing plants like barley, peas and lentils as early as 12,000 years ago.

The findings offer a rare snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming. They also show that Iran was an important player in the origin of agriculture.

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It's All Politics
9:08 am
Fri July 5, 2013

A Lively Political Press In A State Where Everything's Bigger

Texas reporters surround state Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, on Monday.
Todd Wiseman Courtesy of Todd Wiseman

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:22 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country. We take a closer look at the local journalists covering the coming changes, in this part of the series.

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Shots - Health News
8:42 am
Fri July 5, 2013

How Sunscreen Can Burn You

Don't get near that grill with the spray-on sunscreen.
Lisa Thornberg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 12:25 pm

That sunscreen you dutifully spray throughout the day could actually get you burned.

We're not talking sunburn. We're talking people bursting into flames because they're wearing sunscreen.

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration recorded five incidents in which people were burned after their sunscreen caught on fire. One person was hurt after lighting a cigarette. Another stood near a citronella candle.

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Parallels
8:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

In Honduran Crimes, Police Are Seen As Part Of The Problem

A soldier watches over public transport users during an operation in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in April. The crime rate is soaring in Honduras, and corrupt and ineffective law enforcement is widely seen as part of the problem.
Rafael Ochoa Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 4:13 pm

In the fight against drug trafficking, Central America has become a large recipient of U.S. aid, receiving nearly half a billion dollars over the past seven years. The money is being spent on strengthening police and military forces that are outgunned by the narcotics traffickers.

The goal is to repeat the kind of success that took place over time in places like Colombia.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Fri July 5, 2013

That's 'My Son Screaming' On 911 Call, Trayvon's Mother Says

Trayvon Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, testifies Friday in Sanford, Fla.
Gary W. Green/pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:40 pm

Update at 5:50 p.m. ET. The prosecution concluded its case Friday in the trial of George Zimmerman. Afterward, the judge denied a request by the defense to acquit Zimmerman of second-degree murder. The defense had argued that the prosecution had failed to prove its case against him.

Our original post:

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All Songs Considered
8:28 am
Fri July 5, 2013

The Good Listener: Does A Confession Of Love Require A Soundtrack?

Say what you will about Jon Cusack in Say Anything..., but the man knew how to incorporate music into his romantic gesture.
Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:18 am

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the package of Omaha Steaks that sat on our front porch for the duration of a three-week vacation is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, how to incorporate music into romantic gestures.

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Movie Interviews
8:12 am
Fri July 5, 2013

'Quartet': Dustin Hoffman, Behind The Camera

Dustin Hoffman made his directorial debut with the film Quartet. He has starred in such classics as The Graduate, Kramer vs. Kramer and Tootsie.
Kerry Brown The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:03 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 16, 2013.

In December, the actor Dustin Hoffman sat in a box seat at the Kennedy Center as his old friend, Robert De Niro, saluted him at a celebration marking one of the highest accolades for an artist in the United States: a Kennedy Center Honor.

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