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9:16 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Key Takeaways From Pakistan's Report On Osama Bin Laden

Children walk past the house of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 8, 2011. A new Pakistani report says the "extent of incompetence" in failing to detect bin Laden despite the size of the house was "to put it mildly ... astounding, if not unbelievable."
Anjum Naveed AP

We've waded through the 336-page Pakistani report on the circumstances surrounding the killing of Osama bin Laden to find the most interesting bits. As we noted yesterday, it was obtained and published by Al Jazeera.

First of all, it starts more like a novel than a government-commissioned report:

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The Two-Way
8:39 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Reports: Obama Considers Pulling All Troops From Afghanistan

U.S. troops at an April re-enlistment ceremony in Jalalabad, Afghanistan.
Manjunath Kiran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:50 am

President Obama is considering the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014, leaving no small residual force in that nation, according to reports from The New York Times and CNN.

Here's how the Times begins its report:

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The Two-Way
8:12 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Residents Heading Home In Blasted Quebec Town

A view from above showing some of the destruction in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, after Saturday's train derailment, explosions and the fires that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:35 pm

"A majority of the 2,000 people forced out of their Lac-Mégantic, Que., homes following the massive rail tank-car explosions Saturday morning are being allowed to return home today," CBC News reported Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
7:27 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Crash Investigators Turn To Asiana Pilot Who Was At Controls

NTSB investigators at the scene of the Asiana Flight 214 crash in San Francisco.
UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:36 am

  • NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman talks with NPR's Renee Montagne about the crash of Asiana Flight 214

As they try to find out why Asiana Flight 214 crashed Saturday at San Francisco International Airport, federal investigators plan to soon question the pilot who was at the Boeing 777's controls, National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Washington Monument Now Glows At Night

Monday night when the lights came on, visitors came to see a glowing Washington Monument.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:57 am

  • NPR's Trina Williams on the lighting of the Washington Monument

The Two-Way team enjoyed a new view on the way to work in the predawn hours Tuesday morning:

The Washington Monument was all aglow.

As NPR's Trina Williams tells us, 488 lights are giving the monument some sparkle each night. The lights have been installed on scaffolding that surrounds the monument and were switched on at dusk Monday.

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Around the Nation
6:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

NTSB Investigators To Talk More To Cockpit Crew

For the latest developments in the investigation into the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, Renee Montagne talks to the head of the National Transportation Safety Board Deborah Hersman. Of the four pilots, investigators have only talked to two so far. More interviews will be conducted Tuesday.

The Record
6:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Music Festival Grows In The Rainforest

Palsandae, a South Korean troupe, whose wild, very loud music is at times not far removed from the ecstatic free-playing of Sun Ra's Arkestra or the Art Ensemble of Chicago.
Leslie Liew Courtesy of the photographer

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:27 am

The international summer festival circuit is full of contenders, celebrating cultures and subcultures while hustling for global vacation dollars. For musicians, festivals mean exposure, a paycheck and a rolling party of peers. For communities, they're a revenue engine and self-promotion platform. For music-hungry fans, they're vacation anchors, or vacations unto themselves.

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Europe
5:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

Around the Nation
5:23 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The Family That Spits Together, Stays Together

The 40th Annual International Cherry Pit Spitting Championship was just held in Michigan. Matt Krause won when a pit flew nearly 42 feet. His brother Brian has won nine times, and his dad has won the title 15 times.

The Two-Way
5:15 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Book News: Barnes & Noble's CEO Quits

  • Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. resigned Monday following several grim earnings reports and the company's recent announcement that it would stop manufacturing its own Nook tablets. A new chief executive wasn't named, but Michael P. Huseby has been named president of Barnes & Noble and chief executive of the Nook division.
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The Two-Way
5:13 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Egypt's Interim Leader May Tap Emergency Law Used By Mubarak

Egypt's military and the nation's interim leaders say the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was not a coup, but rather a response to public demand. Morsi's supporters believe otherwise. If it was judged to be a coup, the U.S. might have to cut off aid to Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:15 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo

With the news still echoing across Egypt that more than 50 people were killed during a protest over the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, the country's interim leader issued a decree late Monday that gives himself sweeping powers until new elections are held.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
5:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Best Of The Summer: 6 Books The Critics Adore

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:30 pm

There is no one definition of a summer book. It can be a 1,000-page biography, a critically acclaimed literary novel, a memoir everyone is talking about — or it might be your favorite guilty pleasure: romance, crime, science fiction. Whatever you choose, it should be able to sweep you away to another world, because there is nothing like getting totally lost in a book on summer day. Here are a few books that swept away some of our favorite critics.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What's Eating Her? A Writer Meditates On Food And Loneliness

iStockphoto.com

These days, it's often noted that food has displaced art, sport and even sex as the literary mind's propulsive muse. The single cookie that launched poor Proust on his interior odyssey feels shockingly modest compared with the vast smorgasbord today's writers seem almost compelled to revel in.

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Author Interviews
4:44 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Comedian Aisha Tyler Talks About Flipping Off Failure

Tyler says as a kid she stood out because of her height, her glasses, and her vegetarian lunches.
Aisha Tyler

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:50 am

Comedian and actor Aisha Tyler brews beer, plays video games, tells dirty jokes, drinks fancy booze and ... writes books.

She has a new one out this week: Self-inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humilation. We sat down in the NPR studios over a mug of 18-year-old scotch to talk about her most embarrassing moments on the road to success. (No, really, we did. Listen to us toast.)

For those of you wondering who Aisha Tyler is, here's a quick breakdown (to be read quickly):

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Business
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Companies Cash In On Royal Baby Watch

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:18 am

Britain's latest royal may arrive this weekend. Advertising Age reports Harrod's, the venerable British department store, is selling royal baby china. Others getting in on the action: Krispy Kreme is offering doughnuts with pink or blue filling, which color you get is a surprise — just like the baby's gender.

Business
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Alcoa Kicks Off Earnings Season

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:56 am

Over the next few weeks, thousands of U.S. based publicly traded corporations will be reporting their quarterly results. Within days though, judgments will start to be made on whether the economy is holding up well enough to justify stock prices that are approaching a new peak. Alcoa says it lost more money than expected during the second quarter of this year because of restructuring costs.

Business
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Resigns

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:01 am

Lynch's exit comes just two weeks after the bookseller announced it was shelving its goal of becoming a player in the tablet business. Lynch has a tech background, and as CEO focused his attention on the Nook digital business. But the quarter that just ended showed huge losses for the digital devices.

Middle East
3:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Monday's Bloodshed Hardens Political Divisions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:50 am

Egypt's interim president, who was installed by a military coup last week, issued a plan calling for parliamentary elections next year and giving himself sweeping powers in the meantime. His move came hours after the deadliest clash yet between security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

NPR Story
2:58 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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NPR Story
2:58 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Privacy Board To Scrutinize Surveillance Programs

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Just after Edward Snowden first leaked secrets about government surveillance, he gave an interview to two journalists while he was hiding out in Hong Kong. Yesterday, The Guardian newspaper released more of that interview with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras.

GREENE: In that video, Snowden discusses why he exposed the surveillance programs.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

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NPR Story
2:58 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Navigating The Skills To Successfully Land A Jet

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And to help us understand more about what that cockpit crew may have been facing, we reached David Esser. He's an airline transport pilot and a professor of Aeronautical Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Good morning.

DAVID ESSER: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Now even if as we just heard, accidents like this are a result of a chain of events, it's clear in this case that something did go wrong during the landing. Describe for us the difficulty of landing an aircraft like this.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
1:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 6:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Games & Humor
1:43 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Zombie Horror Game, Inspired By ... A Nature Documentary?

In The Last of Us, a fungus called Cordyceps that commonly infects insects has jumped over to humans, creating a fungal zombie apocalypse.
Naughty Dog

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:20 am

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game and it features — no big surprise — zombie-like creatures. But these are not the same old zombies that have dominated movie and TV screens in the past few years.

Neil Druckmann, creative director for The Last of Us, says he wanted a fresh new way to wipe out humanity — and he found it in a BBC documentary series called Planet Earth, which depicts the scary effects of the Cordyceps fungus.

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U.S.
1:42 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Employers Face Changes After Same-Sex-Marriage Ruling

The Supreme Court's decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act will bring changes to retirement plans, health care and other benefits.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:45 am

There are an estimated 225,000 Americans in legally recognized same-sex marriages. The Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act means they are now eligible for the same federal benefits as straight couples.

Many of those benefits touch the workplace, and employers are beginning to think about the changes they will have to make.

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The Salt
1:40 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Why There Are Too Few Cooks For New York City's Elite Kitchens

A view inside the kitchen at chef Peter Hoffman's farm-to-table restaurant, Back Forty West, in New York's Soho neighborhood.
Simon Doggett Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:10 pm

New York City has long been considered the nation's epicenter for all things culinary. The borough of Manhattan had more than 6,000 restaurants at last count. And the city has the most three-star Michelin-starred restaurants in the country — closing in on Paris.

But lately, some cooks have begun to go elsewhere to make names for themselves.

Among the reasons for the culinary exodus: Chefs' obsession with local ingredients is making smaller communities a lot more appealing.

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The Salt
1:39 am
Tue July 9, 2013

As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

Crop consultant Dan Steiner inspects a field of corn near Norfolk, Neb.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Across the Midwestern corn belt, a familiar battle has resumed, hidden in the soil. On one side are tiny, white larvae of the corn rootworm. On the other side are farmers and the insect-killing arsenal of modern agriculture.

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Monkey See
1:38 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Pedal Power To Horsepower: Toys Point Toward Future Of Cars

Mark Takahashi is now one of the "car people" at Edmunds.com — but at the age of 2, the future automotive editor, like his co-worker Mike MaGrath, was more of a toy-car person.
Courtesy Mark Takahashi

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:46 am

Morning Edition has reported that the Toyota Camry is the best-selling car in the U.S., and the Ford Focus is the world's best-seller.

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Shots - Health News
1:37 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Treating The 'Body And Soul' In A Russian TB Prison

An inmate practices for the yearly talent show in the prison's concert hall. Such cultural activities are part of the hospital's treatment, which combines correction with education, medical and psychological therapy.
Konstantin Salomatin/for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:41 am

Igor Davydenko is rail-thin with dark circles under his eyes. He has a haunted look, reinforced by black prison overalls with reflective tape on the shoulders and cuffs.

Davydenko could be labeled as a loser in many ways. The 31-year-old is a drug addict, serving time for robbery and assault. He's serving his third stretch in a Siberian prison.

But Davydenko is about to become a winner in at least one way. If all goes well, he will soon be declared cured of one of the deadliest forms of tuberculosis.

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The Two-Way
12:52 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Video: 3 Kidnapped Cleveland Women Say 'Thank You'

Amanda Berry shown in YouTube video.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:32 am

For the first time, the three women held captive in Cleveland for more than a decade have broken their public silence by releasing a thank you video on YouTube. It was posted at midnight.

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