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3:17 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Transcript: NPR's Interview With Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:38 am

Aghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani is in Washington, D.C., this week for his first official visit. He will go to Capitol Hill and to the White House, where he's expected to push to slow down the drawdown of American troops so that more of them will stay longer in Afghanistan.

That request will be taken seriously, in no small part because President Obama has embraced Ghani as the partner he never had in former President Hamid Karzai.

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It's All Politics
3:03 am
Mon March 23, 2015

5 Reasons Cruz Announced His Candidacy Early

Sen. Ted Cruz needs buzz, money and to be taken seriously. He hopes he can accomplish that by getting in early.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 7:48 am

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz has apparently had enough of the fig leaf most presidential candidates wear as their unofficial spring costume the year before the election actually happens.

That is a bold stroke, but entirely in keeping with the go-for-broke style the junior senator from Texas has exhibited since first challenging the Republican establishment's candidate for the Senate in 2012.

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Jurors Resume Deliberating Atlanta Public Schools Cheating Case

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Copyright 2015 WABE-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wabe.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Former NPR Audio Engineer Bill Deputy Dies At 58

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Sound is at the heart of what we do. And we've lost a colleague who personified the art of gathering it.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

BILL DEPUTY: I was hoping we could do some ambience here.

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NPR Story
2:56 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Eurozone Threatened By Divide Between Greece And Germany

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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It's All Politics
2:56 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Hillary Clinton Is Ready To 'Stand Out' As A Female Candidate

A cropped version of the original photo of Hillary Clinton on this page.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:30 pm

At the end of the grueling 2008 primary fight, Hillary Clinton gathered supporters in Washington, D.C., and delivered perhaps the most memorable line of her whole campaign.

"Although we weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it's got about 18 million cracks in it," Clinton said to roaring applause.

It's a line, one could say, that began paving the way for her seemingly inevitable 2016 campaign.

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Law
2:08 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Is A Confederate Flag License Plate Free Speech?

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 3:58 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court is tackling a question of great interest to America's auto-loving public: Whose speech is that on your specialty license plate? Specifically, when the government issues specialty tags at the behest of private groups or individuals, can it veto messages deemed offensive to others?

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It's All Politics
2:03 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Meet The Attorney Defending Confederate Flag License Plates

R. James George Jr.
Courtesy George Brothers Kincaid & Horton LLP

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:14 pm

Supreme Court advocates do not always play to type. To wit, R. James George Jr., arguing Monday for specialty license plates featuring the Confederate flag.

Not what you might expect from a man who started his legal career as a law clerk for Justice Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

When asked if he would have a license plate on his car honoring the Confederacy, George replies, "I would not generally do that."

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U.S.
1:42 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Census Bureau Tests New Online Survey In Small Towns Ahead Of 2020

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:08 am

The nation is halfway between census years. The next decennial U.S. Census is coming up in 2020. And for the first time, it'll be offered online. That means census officials have lots of work to do to make sure no one is left behind.

For several months this year, the Rev. Thurmond Tillman has been working for the Census Bureau. His main gig is at First African Baptist Church in Savannah, Ga., where's he's been a pastor for more than 30 years.

The sun isn't quite up, but Tillman is already on the road. He crisscrosses coastal Georgia and South Carolina in his black sedan.

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Goats and Soda
1:38 am
Mon March 23, 2015

As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 4:16 pm

Michelle Niescierenko is a pediatric emergency physician at Boston Children's Hospital. But for the past five months she has been in Liberia, helping the country's 21 public hospitals get back on their feet after the devastating Ebola outbreak there. She says the challenges they face are shocking.

"Almost all the hospitals that we worked with in Liberia are running on generators," she says. The trouble with generators is that they require fuel.

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Shots - Health News
1:33 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Rethinking Alcohol: Can Heavy Drinkers Learn To Cut Back?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 6:34 am

The thinking about alcohol dependence used to be black and white. There was a belief that there were two kinds of drinkers: alcoholics and everyone else.

"But that dichotomy — yes or no, you have it or you don't — is inadequate," says Dr. John Mariani, who researches substance abuse at Columbia University. He says that the thinking has evolved, and that the field of psychiatry recognizes there's a spectrum.

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It's All Politics
10:26 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Republican Thorn Ted Cruz Announces Run For President

Sen. Ted Cruz, his wife, Heidi, and their two daughters Catherine (left) and Caroline practice waving on stage at Liberty University before Cruz's Monday presidential campaign launch.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 7:13 am

The 2016 presidential campaign has its first official candidate. Republican Ted Cruz jumped into the race for the presidency, announcing his intentions in a tweet at 12:09 am EDT Monday morning.

"I'm running for president and I hope to earn your support!" the firebrand Texas senator tweeted simply with an embedded video.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Starbucks Will Stop Putting The Words 'Race Together' On Cups

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle. Starbucks baristas will no longer write "Race Together" on customers' cups starting Sunday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 10:08 pm

The most visible part of Starbucks' campaign to get customers talking about race — putting the slogan "Race Together" on coffee cups — has come to an end.

In a memo sent to all Starbucks employees Sunday, CEO Howard Schultz wrote: "This phase of the effort — writing 'Race Together' (or placing stickers) on cups, which was always just the catalyst for a much broader and longer term conversation — will be completed as originally planned today, March 22."

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Environment
4:15 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

In California's Fourth Year Of Drought, New Regulations and $1 Billion In Relief

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 8:49 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Ashraf Ghani: U.S. Critical To Afghanistan's Future

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at the Blair House in Washington, D.C. Ghani will be meeting with President Obama this week.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani tells NPR that most people in his country want a continued U.S. troop presence and that his government is determined to make sure that the self-declared Islamic State does not gain a foothold.

Ghani, on an official visit to the United States, spoke in a wide-ranging interview with Morning Edition host Renee Montagne to be broadcast on Monday.

He says the perception that Afghans are eager for U.S. troops to leave the country is simply untrue. "They see the United States as critical to their future," he says.

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U.S.
3:55 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

In New York, Support Grows For Keeping Teens Out Of Adult Prisons

In December, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio met with youth offenders at alternative housing on Rikers Island. A new state proposal would spare teens younger than 18 from serving time in adult prisons.
Susan Watts ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 4:15 pm

When Charles Nuñez was 17 years old, he was arrested in New York for carrying a handgun that he says he was trying to sell in Harlem. As state law requires, he was prosecuted as an adult and sent to Rikers Island, New York City's notorious prison, where he says he was quickly targeted by older men who wanted to steal his boots and his commissary money.

"One night, when we were locking in to go to sleep, some dude just hit me while I was walking toward my cell," Nuñez says. "He basically ... knocked me out, because I, like, blacked out."

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SXSW Music Festival
3:37 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

From Kate Tempest To Torres, Female Artists Shone At SXSW

The crowd was all smiles during NPR Music's showcase at this year's South By Southwest music festival. We can't send you back in time to hear the shows, but you can listen to some of Bob Boilen's favorite performers from the festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 6:16 pm

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U.S.
3:24 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

A Visit To A Marine Base As Marines Test Whether Women Can Serve In Ground Combat

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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U.S.
3:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Understanding Skid Row's Tensions After A Fatal Police Shooting

Many of LA's Skid Row residents live in makeshift tents.
Kelly McEvers

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 9:15 am

Skid Row, in downtown Los Angeles, has long been known for its high concentration of homeless, drug- or alcohol-addicted and mentally ill residents. They live on the streets, in boxes and tents or in subsidized one-room apartments.

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Author Interviews
3:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'13 Men,' No Clear Answers: Digging Into An Indian Gang Rape Case

In 13 Men journalist Sonia Faleiro chronicles the real-life case of "Baby" — a 20-year-old woman from the tribal village of Subalpur in West Bengal, India. Baby falls in love with a Muslim outsider and, she tells police, is gang-raped as punishment. Villagers maintain that Baby's story was fabricated.
Picasa Sonia Faleiro

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:26 am

Last year, a 20-year-old woman left the Indian capital city of New Delhi and returned to the rural village where she grew up so she could take care of her sick mother.

The woman's name isn't public, but Sonia Faleiro — a journalist who's been investigating her case — calls her "Baby." She says Baby was known as a high-profile figure in her modest village.

"She became a somebody," Faleiro tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "A landowner. An employed young woman. She had money to spend. And she refused to accept that she needed to be like everyone else."

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Parallels
2:37 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Founding Father Of Modern Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, Dies At 91

The crowd cheers as Singapore's former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew (center) arrives at the Marina Bay Floating Platform for the annual National Day Parade celebrations in Singapore on Aug. 9, 2012.
Calvin Wong Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 6:03 am

Lee Kuan Yew, the founding father of modern Singapore and one of Asia's most influential politicians, has died at age 91, according to the Singapore Prime Minister's office.

During more than a half-century as Singapore's leader, he helped turn the city-state from a sleepy British colony into an affluent and efficient trading enclave, which enjoys the world's third-highest per capita GDP.

But he was also criticized for running a one-party, authoritarian regime under which critics were muzzled and political rivals hounded.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Top Beijing Scientist: China Faces 'Huge Impact' From Climate Change

Smoke billows from chimneys of a steel plant on a hazy day in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, earlier this month.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:06 pm

China's top weather scientist has made a rare official acknowledgement: climate change, he says, could have a "huge impact" on the country's crop yields and infrastructure.

Zheng Guogang, the head of China's meteorological administration, tells Xinhua news agency that China is already experiencing temperature increases that outpace those in other parts of the world.

As a result, China — the world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases — faces a possible "ecological degradation," he says.

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Parallels
10:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Parisians Sing The Praises Of 'Singin In The Rain'

An actor performs during a March 9 rehearsal of Singin' in the Rain on the stage of the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris. American musicals were rarely performed in France in the past, but have been a huge hit in recent years.
Jacques Demarthon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 5:43 am

Once again, Parisians are ecstatic over the latest American musical production playing at the city's Chatelet Theatre.

"Singin' in the Rain is a little corner of paradise," the French newspaper Le Figaro wrote of the show, which is playing through March 26 to sold-out audiences.

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Goats and Soda
9:08 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Keeping Women Out Of The Workforce Is Economic Nonsense

A mine-lift operator in Yenakievo, Ukraine.
Misha Friedman

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:48 am

Gender equality is "humanity's biggest project," Lakshmi Puri told the United Nations this past week. Puri, the deputy executive director of U.N. Women, wants to achieve "Planet 50-50" by 2030.

When it comes to the workplace, equal employment opportunities aren't just a benefit to women. Several new studies point out that discriminatory practices that keep women out of the workforce are not only unjust, but economically nonsensical as well.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun March 22, 2015

ISIS Issues 'Wanted' List Of 100 U.S. Military Personnel

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 8:10 am

The self-declared Islamic State has posted names, photos and what it says are addresses of 100 U.S. military personnel, calling on its supporters to "deal" with them.

The extremist group's so-called "hacking division," says the individuals have been part of efforts to defeat ISIS in Syria, Iraq and Yemen.

It says it has decided to release the information about the U.S. servicemen and servicewomen so "brothers in America can deal with you."

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Parallels
7:53 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Qatar Digital Library Preserves The Music Of A Vanishing Past

Ṣawt musicians during a performance in Kuwait in May 2014.
Rolf Killius Qatar Digital Library

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 11:30 am

The songs our grandparents sang can tell us who we are. Here in the U.S., the Lomax family became famous in the 1930s, when they recorded America's folk music.

In other countries that are changing fast, people are also trying to hold onto their heritage. The tiny, super-rich state of Qatar takes pride in its modernity, with its gleaming skyscrapers and lucrative gas fields. But it is also investing in a huge history project.

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Arts & Life
7:19 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Decades Before YouTube, Video Pioneers Captured Turbulent Era

From left, Videofreex David Cort, Bart Friedman and Parry Teasdale filmed kids' programs and daily goings-on in 1973 at their Maple Tree Farm in Lanesville, N.Y.
John Dominis Courtesy of Videofreex

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 10:02 am

Back in the pre-digital era — when telephones were used for talking, not photographing and filming, and before YouTube came along to broadcast everyone's videos — capturing and disseminating moving images was expensive, time consuming and decidedly non-portable.

But that changed in 1967, when Sony introduced the world's first portable video tape recorder. Before long, enthusiasts formed "media collectives" that captured the social and cultural upheaval of the era. Fueled by a mix of the tunes, the tokes and the times, video became part of the revolution it was documenting.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Shiite Rebels In Yemen Reportedly Seize Parts Of Southern City

Anti-Houthi protesters carry an injured fellow protester during clashes with Houthi fighters in Yemen's southwestern city of Taiz on Sunday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:09 pm

Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

Houthi rebels who have already seized most of Yemen's capital, Sanaa, have now captured parts of one of the country's largest cities, a day after the U.S. withdrew about 100 U.S. military personnel from another city besieged by rival al-Qaida fighters.

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Sun March 22, 2015

Ted Cruz Set To Announce Presidential Bid

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz speaks with area business leaders during a Politics and Eggs breakfast, on March 16 in Manchester, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 5:10 pm

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz will announce Monday he is running for the Republican nomination for president, a close aide of the lawmaker confirmed to NPR following a report first published by The Houston Chronicle.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun March 22, 2015

What's Last Comes First

NPR

Originally published on Sun March 22, 2015 7:19 am

On-air challenge: You'll be given some words. For each one, name another word that can follow the first to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase. The last and first letters, respectively, of the first word must be the first and second letters, respectively, of the second. For example, given "tennis," you would say "stadium" or "stroke."

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